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Sprite Color Codes

PDLJMPR Web Magazine

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Tadah!!! Here they are!!!
These table was kindly supplied, courtesy of Frans Diepeveen.
Neither Frans nor I want to be responsible for their correctness.......
So use these codes at your own risk!!!

MK 1: 1958-1960

Exterior Color BMC Code ICI Code Interior Hood Remarks
Speedwell Blue BU.1 3131 Blue Black 1958 Only
Pale Primrose Yellow YL.12 3297 Black Black 1958 Only
Dark Green GN.12 0152/5107 Green Black 1958 Only
Cherry Red RD.4 3102 Red Black 1958 Only
Old English White WT.3 2379/2122 Red Black
Old English White WT.3 2379/2122 Black Black 1959 On
Leaf Green GN.14 3242 Green Black 1959 On
Iris Blue BU.12 3243 Blue Black 1959 On
Nevada Beige BG.4 3305 Red Black 1959 On


MK II: 1961-1962

Exterior Color BMC Code ICI Code Interior Hood Remarks
Signal Red RD.2 3742 Black Black 1961
Speedwell Blue BU.1 3131 Blue Blue 1961
Old English White WT.3 2379/2122 Black Grey
Old English White WT.3 2379/2122 Red Grey 1961
Highway Yellow YL.9 3480 Black Black
Deep Pink RD.18 3481 Black Black
Black BK.1 122 Cherry Red Grey late 1961
Signal Red RD.2 3742 Red Black 1962
Old English White WT.3 2379/2122 Red Grey 1962
Black BK.1 122 Red Grey 1962
Iris Blue BU.12 3243 Blue Blue 1962



MK II: 1963-1964

Exterior Color BMC Code ICI Code Interior Hood Remarks
Signal Red RD.2 3742 Red Red
Signal Red RD.2 3742 Black Red
Iris Blue BU.12 3243 Blue Dark Blue
Old English White WT.3 2379/2122 Hazelnut Hazelnut
Old English White WT.3 2379/2122 Black Black
Old English White WT.3 2379/2122 Red Grey
Fiesta Yellow YL.11 3484 Black Black
Dove Grey GY.26 3346 Red Grey
Black BK.1 122 Red Black
Black BK.1 122 Hazelnut Hazelnut
British Racing Green GN.29 8120 Black Black



MK III: 03/1964-10/1966

Exterior Color BMC Code ICI Code Interior Hood Remarks
Tartan Red RD.9 3770 Red Red
Tartan Red RD.9 3770 Black Red
Riviera Blue BU.44 4022 Light Blue Light Blue
British Racing Green GN.29 8120 Black Black
Old English White WT.3 2379/2122 Black Black
Old English White WT.3 2379/2122 Red Grey
Dove Grey GY.26 3346 Red Grey
Black BK.1 122 Red Black
Fiesta Yellow YL.11 3484 Black Black 1964-1965
Palle Primrose Yellow YL.11 3297 Black Black 1966



MK IV: 10/1966-1968

Exterior Color BMC Code ICI Code Interior Hood Remarks
Tartan Red RD.9 3770 Red Black
Basilica Blue BU.11 3169 Black Black
British Racing Green GN.29 8120 Black Black
Old English White WT.3 2379/2122 Black Black
Old English White WT.3 2379/2122 Red Black
Black BK.1 122 Red Black
Black BK.1 122 Black Black
Pale Primrose Yellow YL.12 3297 Black Black



MK IV: 1969

Exterior Color BMC Code ICI Code Interior Hood Remarks
Snowberry White WT.4 3012 Black Black
British Racing Green GN.29 8120 Black Black
Tartan Red RD.9 3770 Black Black
Mineral Blue BU.9 3130 Black Black
Black BK.1 122 Black Black
Pale Primrose Yellow YL.12 3297 Black Black



MK IV: 1970

Exterior Color BMC Code ICI Code Interior Hood Remarks
Glacier White BLVC.58 4309 Black Black
Blue Royale BU.38 5186 Black Black
Flame Red RD.14 3000 Black Black
Pale Primrose Yellow YL.12 3297 Black Black
Bronze Yellow BLVC.15 9785 Black Black
British Racing Green GN.29 8120 Black Black
Black BK.1 122 Black Black



MK IV: 1971

Exterior Color BMC Code ICI Code Interior Hood Remarks
Glacier White BLVC.59 4309 Black Black
Bronze Yellow BLVC.15 9785 Black Black
Flame Red RD.14 3000 Black Black
Midnight Blue BLVC.12 7963 Black Black
Blaze (orange) BLVC.16 7864 Black Black
Bedouin (biege) BLVC.4 7855 Black Black
Teal Blue BLVC.18 7918 Black Black
Racing Green BLVC.25 7985 Black Black
Color BMC ICI
Healey Blue BU2 2697/2301m
Metallic Golden Beige BG19 3006m/2496m
Aluminum (painted wire wheels) AL1


A trip to a long established glass and paint shop results-- a re-acquaintance with a high school classmate (HA! Small World!). Dan spent at least a hour and a half educating me about paint systems and researching these colors. (A paint system is all of the elements, from one manufacturer, going into a paint job. i.e.- metal prep. prod., primer, primer-surfacer, filler, paint, reducer, polisher, etc.) Now to the paint angst. In the U.S. the players in the paint business are: DUPONT and PPG. These are the folks we look to, to provide the correct recipe in their paint to match the color that was put on at the factory. But our cars are old cars, and so we are talking about old technology paint systems-- acrylic laquer and thinner, or, acrylic enamel and reducer. These are the two paint types that you are apt to find cross-referenced recipes by the manufacturer. Otherwise, with the newer paint systems, you are forced to match a sample of the color you want against a book of color samples. Color matching against samples is problematic in a few ways. First you have to have a sample. [Sounds simple, but the only sample I had of Healey Blue is on an area of the underside of the front shroud, not something you want to tote around to paint stores. Also, is your sample faded by age or sunlight??] Second, you have to match it. [Also sounds simple, but here too are a couple of caveats. First, don't try to match colors in the store's florescent lighting, do it outside in the natural sunlight. Artificial light isn't color balanced, have your photographer friends explain this principle to you. Florescents emphasize blue, incandescents emphasize yellow light.] Also, compare three colors at a time. Your sample, your best target choice, and a contrasting color to help your eyes set the match. Try it you'll see what I mean. Comparing blue/blue may show a very close match to the eye with the target looking ever so slightly lighter in color, yet, when, say, a contrasting green is brought into proximity, the target shows to be a yellow blue instead. Acrylic laquer is probably used most by us 'paint in your garage' types because of its properties. It dries to the touch very quickly, so it's much less susceptible to trapping dust, dust is obviously an issue unless you have a paint booth with filtered air circulation. Also, imperfections found after spraying, can be sanded out and spot resprayed without much bother. Laquers dry to a semi-gloss so the paint job isn't complete until the finish has been polished by sanding with a very fine grit sanding medium to bring out the final gloss luster. This attribute is a minus when it comes to painting doorjams, frames, and wheel-wells, you can't very well finish these off by sanding. Also, laquer paint isn't particularly durable, it chips easier, and will fade its color over time, in other words, it's a high maintenance finish, requiring waxing and polishing to keep it up. Most importantly, its probably unavailable, as it is quickly being regulated out of circulation. Laquers fall into a catagory of High VOC substances [VOC - Volatile Organic Compound] that are being regulated out of existance for your health and mine. (That's why it dries so quickly, alot of quick evaporating solvent in its composition). Dan found Duponts cross references as follows: DUPONT 8179 Healey Blue BU 2 DUPONT 8178 Metalic Golden Beige BG 19 No listing for AL 1. He had a well worn color chip sample book dating back to the late '60's, but it didn't have either color entry so I had him make be up a quart of each for a test spray to see how they would look, and as a sample to match to other paint systems if I chose a different route. After the paints were mixed and home I took alook at the M. Golden Beige and it reminded me of the common brown metalic of the Triumph Spitfires and I wasn't too interested in it. The Healey Blue impressed me as being on the dark side and sure enough after I sprayed a sample out, it was a couple of shades darker to my eye and not what I wanted or imagined either. Acrylic Enamel is the other old technology paint. It dries to a more durable gloss, but it dries slooowly, so dust and insects are an issue. The DUPONT colors above were only available in the laquer paint scheme. When talking of new paint systems, the prevalent one seems to be the Color-Coat/Clear-Coat systems of both DUPONT and PPG where a couple of color coats are applied over the primer, and after a flash-off period the clear gloss coat is sprayed. But this system isn't designed for us 'paint in the garage types'. For one, they're a catalyst based system were you mix in a reagent like epoxy, and you have x amount of time to get the spray done and clean up your equipment before it sets up. If you have a problem during spraying, you quickly have a cascading set of problems. They're really designed for a professional spray booth with a clean enviornment, filtered air supply, with the person spraying covered head to toe with protection from skin exposure and wearing a supplied air mask. scary. These paints are isocyanate based. [Heck even the hardener I got to put into Acrylic Enamel for another project is isocyanate based.] This stuff can absorb thru your skin into your system, not good. All the paint masks with the canister filters I've researched that were rated for paint and organic solvent protection excluded isocyanate compounds emphatically. Where does this leave us? In a quandry I'm afraid. Why bother trying ourselves? To control the process and quality. Besides, now that the car is dismantled down as far as I can go I can't tow it to the body shop. In Summary: "Oh, Oh, My work in progress is unresolved!"