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Windows 98 Help Page Two

Modem Help

Some times modems can be fickle with Win95/98, especially internal modems.

If windows did not detect you modem, try installing it yourself from Control Panel and double clicking on Modems. This starts the Modem installation wizard which will guide you through the rest of the install. Also some computers will need to have Comm 2 turned off in the bios if you are installing an internal modem. I haven't found any pattern to this and have had to set the internal modem jumpers from auto set to manual settings to get Windows to find it. This will not be a problem for externals.

If your modem will not dial or connect, try the following;

  1. Verify the size and dates of the files Comm.drv and Serial.vxd in the System folder against the original versions from the Win 98 CD.
  2. Confirm the following lines in system.ini;

    [boot]

    Comm.drv=Comm.drv

    [386enh]

    device=*vcd

  3. Go to Device Manager from System in Control Panel and select the Comm ports. Change or make sure that the correct drivers are loaded in the Properties area. Run     Add New Hardware   wizard in control panel and install the Windows 98 drivers. NOTE Windows 98 installs the Serial.vxd driver in the registry not in system.ini.
  4. Now verify your modem configuration by going to Control Panel and double clicking on Modems. Verify the manufacturer and model. If it is not correct, highlight the installed modem and click on remove.

    Run  the Install New Modem wizard to detect your modem. If  it detects the incorrect modem chose to chose from the list available. If your modem is not on the list you can select the Generic Modem driver and set the baud for your modem or use Have Disk and install from the manufacturer's support disk. Make sure to remove any extra modems entries to eliminate conflicts.

  5. Verify that the correct port is selected for your modem. Comm 3 will not work if you have a mouse connected to Comm 1, they will conflict because Comm 1 and Comm 3 use the same resources. Normal/most used port is Comm 2 for modems.
  6. Verify the serial port I/O address and IRQ are correct. Go to Device Manager and click on the port you've chosen and then click on Properties. Click Resources and make sure it is set to your modem manufacture's recommended settings. Now check for any conflicting devices in Device Manager, you may have to change the configuration if your modem conflicts with something else. Also Microsoft has reported that some display adapters have conflicts with Comm 4 ports.
  7. To check the baud rate of the modem, go to Control Panel and double click Modems. Select the modem and then Properties and then click General. Set the baud rate to you modem's rate. You can play around with this setting to optimize throughput.  

USR/3COM modems;

Installing a new or upgraded V.90 3COM/USR 56K FAX INT (EXT) Modem
Especially the latest released upgrades for modem models 840-04,
839-05, 1786-00, 1787-00...These procedures will give you a clean
system so that the modem will be installed correctly with the new
.inf file released 6-8-98 which includes new installation information
for the above mentioned modems and also all other 33.6K and 56K FAX
(non-voice) modems...This procedure may also be used with Voice Modems
but the two files to download are mdm3comv.inf and 3comwave.inf...I
don't have a Voice modem to test it on, but I don't see any reason
why it shouldn't work for them too...  

1. Download the new "Windows driver", mdm3com.inf 48.9KB from 3COM's
   upgrade site, http://www.3com.com/56k/usr/upgrade/muw.html for
   the four models mentioned above, to a floppy...You will find it
   as an embedded link in the following note on that page...

     NOTE: If you are upgrading an 840-04,
           839-05, 1786-00 or 1787-00 model, you also
           need to download this [Windows driver] to
           enhance the performance of your modem in the
           Windows operating system. If you are using
           Netscape, hold down the shift key while clicking
           on this link.     

   Also this file includes information for previously upgraded FAX
   modems too..PLEASE NOTE,  http://www.usr.com/home/online/
   DOES NOT contain information for those four models released on
   6-8-98, even though it has the same filename, mdm3com.inf, as
   the one from the MUW page, it only has 48.2KB..Note; the 4-17-98
   file date listed is incorrect also...Both files have two x2
   speed connect messages missing (34,666 and 38,666), but that
   should not be a problem for most people...

2. NOTE: The \inf folder may be a hidden folder on your system...
   In order to find these files you must set Windows Explorer to
   view hidden files...In Windows Explorer, click VIEW/OPTIONS and
   on the VIEW TAB, Hidden Files, Select  Show All Files...This
   was passed along to me... In Win98, go to SETTINGS/Folder
   Options/View Tab and under Hidden Files, select SHOW All Files. 
   Click START/FIND/FILES OR FOLDERS, enter 3co*.inf in the search
   window and start the search...When a list of files comes up in
   the window, click on EDIT, SELECT ALL which will highlight all
   those files that the search found, then click on FILE, DELETE to
   send all those files to the Recycle Bin...Do the same thing for
   searches for these files  mdmus*.inf, mdm3c*.inf, and usr*.inf...
   Your search may not turn up all of the above files, but they
   may be on your system from earlier modem installations for x2...
  

3. Double click on Recycle Bin to open it up, then click on FILE,
   EMPTY RECYCLE BIN to clear all those old files off your system...

4. Click START/SETTINGS/CONTROL PANEL and double click on MODEMS...
   Highlight the "U.S. Robotics"  modem(s) and click on [REMOVE] to
   remove them from your system...

5. Now then it's time to start the re-install with the new Driver
   file, mdm3com.inf on the floppy...If your modem is installed by
   Plug n Pray, the following should take place upon rebooting...
   If your modem is installed as a legacy device, where the COM
   Port and IRQ are selected by jumper straps, you will need to
   use "ADD NEW HARDWARE" in Control Panel to start the install
   after you reboot...

6. Either way you install your modem, it will, or should bring you
   to the "Update Device Driver Wizard" where it is stated that
   it will complete the installation of "Standard Modem"...This is
   good, since it shows that your system is clean of any 3COM driver
   that will work with your modem...But, you do NOT want to install
   a "Standard Modem"...

7. This is where you insert the floppy with the new mdm3com.inf
   file on it...Then click [NEXT], the wizard will find the driver
   on the floppy, then display it as "U.S. Robotics 56K FAX INT" or
   EXT whichever type you are installing...Then click [FINISH]...

8. Go to Control Panel and double click Modems to check for the
   modem that you just installed...Click the Diagnostics Tab, then
   highlight the COM port that your modem is on, then click on
   [MORE INFO] and if all is well, in a few seconds you should see
   the results of the tests displayed in the window...If all is OK
   to this point, CONGRATULATIONS, you have won this battle, but
   the war isn't over yet...

9. During the installation from floppy, a strange thing takes place
   concerning the mdm3com.inf file...That file is copied to the HD
   and placed in the C:\Windows\Inf\Other folder and renamed to
   3com corp.mdm3com.inf ...This did not happen on the earlier
   version of mdm3com.inf...Several attempts to install the modem
   from the HD with the new mdm3com.inf file in C:\windows\inf  and
   C:\windows\inf\other folders, failed...It will only install from
   the floppy successfully...The modem file name on the floppy
   remained as mdm3com.inf...

10.Check your DUN configuration settings for port speed of 115,200
   8,N,1 and use Hardware (RTS/CTS) flow control, and Error Control,
   Compress Data, also put a check in "Record a Log File" and remove
   anything you have in the "Extra Settings" window...[OK] back out
   of it so the changes will take effect...I have heard that in
   Win98, this logging function is automatic, and you can select,
   APPEND if you want the log to accumulate after each connection..

11.Now you are ready to try out the freshly installed modem, but
   before you dial out, go to C:\windows and delete the file named
   ModemLog.txt, from that folder...A new one will be generated with
   current data in it, when you have the "Record a log file" checked
   in your DUN configuration...Not required in Win98, see step 10...
   Now dialup to your PoP, log in, check your mail, etc. then
   disconnect...

12.Time to check out what happened during that last session...Go to
   C:\windows and open ModemLog.txt in Notepad, and you should get
   a display that looks like the one pasted below of my last connect..
   In Win98, the log file will be in C:\windows with a file name of
   <modem name.log>, ex. U.S. Robotics 56K FAX EXT PnP.log and it
   can also be read with Quick View in the DUN window...
 
      
06-18-1998 18:53:32.61 - U.S. Robotics 56K FAX INT in use.
06-18-1998 18:53:32.64 - Modem type: U.S. Robotics 56K FAX INT
06-18-1998 18:53:32.64 - Modem inf path: 3COMCO~1.INF
06-18-1998 18:53:32.64 - Modem inf section: ModemPCMin
06-18-1998 18:53:32.86 - 115200,N,8,1
06-18-1998 18:53:33.01 - 115200,N,8,1
06-18-1998 18:53:33.01 - Initializing modem.
06-18-1998 18:53:33.01 - Send: AT<cr>
06-18-1998 18:53:33.01 - Recv: AT<cr>
06-18-1998 18:53:33.15 - Recv: <cr><lf>OK<cr><lf>
06-18-1998 18:53:33.15 - Interpreted response: Ok
06-18-1998 18:53:33.15 - Send: AT&F1E0Q0V1&C1&D2S0=0<cr>
06-18-1998 18:53:33.15 - Recv: AT&F1E0Q0V1&C1&D2S0=0<cr>
06-18-1998 18:53:33.27 - Recv: <cr><lf>OK<cr><lf>
06-18-1998 18:53:33.27 - Interpreted response: Ok
06-18-1998 18:53:33.27 - Send: ATS7=60S19=0L0M1&M4&K1&H1&R2&I0B0X4<cr>
06-18-1998 18:53:33.40 - Recv: <cr><lf>OK<cr><lf>
06-18-1998 18:53:33.40 - Interpreted response: Ok
06-18-1998 18:53:33.40 - Send: ATM0<cr>
06-18-1998 18:53:33.53 - Recv: <cr><lf>OK<cr><lf>
06-18-1998 18:53:33.53 - Interpreted response: Ok
06-18-1998 18:53:33.53 - Dialing.
06-18-1998 18:53:33.53 - Send: ATDT;<cr>
06-18-1998 18:53:35.13 - Recv: <cr><lf>OK<cr><lf>
06-18-1998 18:53:35.13 - Interpreted response: Ok
06-18-1998 18:53:35.13 - Dialing.
06-18-1998 18:53:35.13 - Send: ATDT#######<cr>
06-18-1998 18:53:52.24 - Recv: <cr><lf>CONNECT
50666/ARQ/V90/LAPM/V42BIS<cr><lf>
06-18-1998 18:53:52.24 - Interpreted response: Connect
06-18-1998 18:53:52.24 - Connection established at 50666bps.
06-18-1998 18:53:52.24 - Error-control on.
06-18-1998 18:53:52.24 - Data compression on.
06-18-1998 18:53:52.26 - 115200,N,8,1
06-18-1998 18:55:27.16 - Hanging up the modem.
06-18-1998 18:55:27.16 - Hardware hang-up by lowering DTR.
06-18-1998 18:55:27.27 - Recv: <cr><lf>NO CARRIER<cr><lf>
06-18-1998 18:55:27.27 - Interpreted response: No Carrier
06-18-1998 18:55:27.27 - Send: ATH<cr>
06-18-1998 18:55:27.39 - Recv: <cr><lf>OK<cr><lf>
06-18-1998 18:55:27.39 - Interpreted response: Ok
06-18-1998 18:55:27.48 - Session Statistics:
06-18-1998 18:55:27.48 -                 Reads : 132337 bytes
06-18-1998 18:55:27.48 -                 Writes: 11421 bytes
06-18-1998 18:55:27.48 - U.S. Robotics 56K FAX INT closed.




13.As you can see, that is a record of everything that took place
   during your last call, and the modem responses to each init string
   and AT commands that are issued to it...Notice the Modem inf path:
   3COMCO~1.INF...That is the DOS presentation for the file named
   "3Com Corp.mdm3com.inf", as written to the C:\windows\inf\other
   folder when the modem was installed from the floppy that has the
   new mdm3com.inf file on it...The filename on the floppy has not
   changed...

14.What this is saying in the Modem inf path, is that if your
   report says MDM3COM.INF, then your modem is not installed with
   the latest release of that file...The earlier releases of that
   file is still good, for all other models of USR FAX
   modems, except those released for V.90 upgrades on 6-8-98 ...
   Those models are the 840-04, 839-05, 1786-00, and 1787-00...
  

15.Another great little diagnostic utility that will check out the
   Registry for proper modem installation is a file named mdu.exe...
   You can download it free from http://modemhelp.com/download.html
   Below is a portion of the information retrieved from my Registry
   search on modems using mdu.exe...Information displayed will be
   slightly different on different systems, Win95 or Win98, and INT
   or EXT modem being installed, but should generally be as below...



System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Class\Modem\0003
   CallerIDOutSide=O
   CallerIDPrivate=P
   VariableTerminator=<cr><lf>
   ConfigDialog=modemui.dll
   DevLoader=*vcomm
   EnumPropPages=modemui.dll,EnumPropPages
   FriendlyDriver=unimodem.vxd
   InactivityFormat=minutes
   Reset=AT&F1<cr>
   InfPath=3COMCO~1.INF
   InfSection=ModemPCMin
   DriverDate= 6-17-1998
   DriverDesc=U.S. Robotics 56K FAX INT
   AttachedTo=COM3
   Manufacturer=3Com Corp.
   Model=U.S. Robotics 56K FAX INT
   LoggingPath=C:\WINDOWS\ModemLog.txt
   UserInit=M0

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Shortcuts for Win98

Explorer Shortcuts
General folder / Windows Explorer shortcuts for a "Selected Object"

F2    Rename
F3    Find
CTRL+X, C, or V    Cut, Copy, or Paste
SHIFT+DELETE    Delete immediately without putting the file in Recycle Bin
ALT+ENTER    Properties
ALT+double-click    Properties
CTRL+right-click    Put alternative verbs on the context menu (Open With)
SHIFT+double-click    Explore the object if it has an Explore command
CTRL+drag a file to a folder    Copy a file
CTRL+SHIFT+drag a file to the desktop or a folder    Create a shortcut
CTRL+ESC,ESC,TAB,SHIFT+F10    Open taskbar properties

General control over folders/Windows Explorer

F4 (Explorer)    Displays the combo box
F5    Refresh
F6    Switches between panes in Windows Explorer
CTRL+G(Windows Explorer)    Goto
CTRL+Z    Undo
CTRL+A    Select all
BACKSPACE    Goes to the parent folder
SHIFT+    Closes this folder and all its parent folders

In Windows Explorer

Num*    Expands everything under selection
Num-    Expands selection
Num+ or Right arrow    Collapses selection
Right arrow    Expands current selection if it's collapsed; otherwise goes to the first child.
Left arrow    Collapses current selection if it's expanded; otherwise goes to the parent

In Properties

CTRL+TAB or CTRL+SHIFT+TAB    Switches between Properties tabs

In Open/Save Common Dialog Boxes
F4    Drop down the location list
F5    Refresh the view
Backspace    Go to parent folder if focus is on view window

General Keyboard-Only Commands

F1    Help
F10    Goes to menu mode
SHIFT+F10    Context menu for selected item
CTRL+ESC    Brings up Start menu
CTRL+ESC, ESC    Focus on the Start button
SHIFT+F10    Context menu
ALT+TAB    Switch to the running program
SHIFT while inserting CD    Bypasses auto-run
Alt+M when focus is on taskbar    Minimizes all windows

Accessibility Shortcuts

Tap SHIFT 5 times    Toggles StickyKeys on/off
Hold down Right SHIFT for 8 seconds    Toggles FilterKeys on/off
Hold down NumLock for 5 seconds    Toggles ToggleKeys on/off
Left ALT+LEFT+SHIFT +NumLock    Toggles MouseKeys on/off
Left ALT+LEFT+SHIFT +PrintScreen    Toggles HighContrast on/off

MS Natural Keyboard

Win+R    Run dialog
Win+M    Minimize All
Shift-Win+M    Undo Minimize All
Win+F1    Windows Help
Win+E    Explorer
Win+F    Find Files or Folders
CTRL+Win+F    Find Computer
Win+Tab    Cycle through taskbar buttons
Win+Break    PSS Hotkey... (System properties)

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System Tools

Version Conflict Manager Tool

This describes the Version Conflict Manager tool included in Windows 98. You can use the Version Conflict Manager tool to troubleshoot problems that may occur after you install a program.

NOTE: The Windows 98 Help topic "Version Conflict Manager" describes the Version Conflict Manager tool incorrectly.

During the installation of a new program (including Windows 98), files on your hard disk may be detected and replaced with older versions. If a newer version of a file is detected by Windows 98 Setup, a version conflict occurs. Prior to Windows 98, most installation programs (including Windows 95) prompt you to either keep the existing file or overwrite the file with the older file. When you install Windows 98, this prompt does not appear and newer files replaced by Windows 98 Setup are automatically backed up to your hard disk for compatibility purposes.

For example, if you upgrade a Windows 95-based computer that uses a newer version of the Commdlg.dll file to Windows 98, the newer Commdlg.dll file is backed up and the older Commdlg.dll file is copied to your computer.

The Version Conflict Manager tool lists all the backup files, the dates they were backed up, the version number of the backed up files, and the version number of the file currently in use. When you use the Version Conflict Manager tool to restore a backed up file, the file that is currently in use by Windows 98 is backed up, and the backup file is restored.

To start the Version Conflict Manager tool and restore a backed up file, use the following steps:

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click System Information.
  2. On the Tools menu, click Version Conflict Manager.
  3. Click the file that you want to restore, and then click Restore Selected Files.

Signature Verification Tool

Windows 98 includes a tool called Microsoft Signature Verification Tool. You can use this tool to view files to determine if they are signed or unsigned files. This article describes the Signature Verification tool.

The Signature Verification tool finds signed and unsigned files on your computer. A signed file is a file that has been given a digital signature by a certifying authority. The digital signature indicates that the file is an unaltered copy of the original file. With the Signature Verification tool, you can:

  1. Search for signed files in a specific location.
  2. Search for unsigned files in a specific location.
  3. View the certificates of the signed files to make sure the files have not been tampered with.
How to Search for Signed or Unsigned Files

To search for signed or unsigned files, use the following steps:

  1. Click Start, Point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click System Information.
  2. On the Tools menu, click Signature Verification Tool.
  3. In the Look For box, click Signed Files or Not Signed Files.

If you are looking for a specific file, type the name of the file you want to find in the Named box, and then click Find Now. If you are not looking for a specific file and you want to view all signed or unsigned files, click Find Now.

How to View a Certificate of a Signed File

To view a signed file's certificate, use the following steps:

  1. Click Start, Point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click System Information.
  2. On the Tools menu, click Signature Verification Tool.
  3. In the Look For box, click Signed Files.
  4. If you are looking for a specific file, type the name of the file you want to find in the Named box, and then click Find Now. If you are not looking for a specific file and you want to view all signed files, click Find Now.

  5. Click the signed file name, and then click Details.

System File Checker Tool (Sfc.exe)

System File Checker checks for damaged or replaced system files, and then prompts you to replace any files that do not match the original Windows 98 files.

To start System File Checker, use the following steps:

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, click System Information, and then click System File Checker on the Tools menu.
  2. Click one of the following options:

- Scan For Altered Files

- Extract One File From Installation Disk

NOTE: If you click Extract One File From Installation Disk, you can specify the file you want to extract.

Click Settings, choose the configuration you want to use in System File Checker Settings, click OK, and then click Start.

For more information about how to use the Microsoft System Information tool in Windows 98, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: ARTICLE-ID: Q184075 TITLE : Description of Microsoft System Information (Msinfo32.exe) Tool

Automatic Skip Driver Agent (Asd.exe) Tool

Automatic Skip Driver Agent identifies devices that can cause Windows 98 to stop responding (hang) when you start your computer, and then disables them so that they are bypassed when you next restart your computer.

To start Automatic Skip Driver;

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, click System Information
  2. Then click Automatic Skip Driver Agent on the Tools menu.

For more information about how to use the Microsoft System Information tool in Windows 98, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: ARTICLE-ID : Q184075   TITLE : Description of Microsoft System Information (Msinfo32.exe) Tool

All devices or operations that have failed to start are listed by Automatic Skip Driver Agent. You can use Automatic Skip Driver Agent to enable any device it has previously disabled, and Windows 98 then tries to use the device when you next restart your computer. If this device or operation does not start correctly, your computer stops responding.

If you then restart your computer for a third time, Automatic Skip Driver Agent prevents the device or operation from running, and when your computer starts, click Details to identify the device or operation that does not start correctly and then display a suggested course of action.

If Automatic Skip Driver Agent is unable to locate any errors, you may receive a message stating so, and you can then click OK to quit Automatic Skip Driver Agent.

NOTE: Devices disabled by Automatic Skip Driver Agent to allow Windows to start are recorded in the Asd.log file.

Disk Defragmenter Tool

When a program is installed on your computer, the program's files may be broken up over multiple locations on your hard disk. This is called fragmentation. If fragmentation occurs on your hard disk, the performance of programs on your computer is slower. The Disk Defragmenter tool optimizes the performance of your computer by reorganizing the files on your hard disk into contiguous blocks. When the Disk Defragmenter tool completes the defragmentation of files on your hard disk, the performance of your programs is faster because the files are arranged closer together.

NOTE: You can use other programs while you are running the Disk Defragmenter tool. However, your computer will operate slower than normal.

To start the Disk Defragmenter tool, use the following steps:

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Disk Defragmenter.
  2. Click the drive you want to defragment, click OK, and then click Yes.

Maintenance Wizard (Tuneup.exe) Tool

The Maintenance wizard is a tool you can use to schedule maintenance programs so that they run automatically. To start Maintenance wizard, click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Windows Tune-Up. The following maintenance programs can be scheduled to run automatically by Maintenance wizard:

ScanDisk
Disk Space Manager
Disk Defragmenter

You can modify the start time to any particular time you want these programs to start. To alter these times, run the wizard, and then follow the instructions on the screen.

Disk Cleanup Tool

When you use the Disk Cleanup tool, you can free hard disk space on your computer by:

Deleting temporary Internet files.
Deleting downloaded program files.
Emptying the Recycle Bin.
Deleting files from your temporary folder.
Deleting files created by other Windows 98 tools.
Removing optional Windows 98 components that you do not use.
Removing installed programs that you do not use.
Converting your hard disk drive to the FAT32 file system.

To free hard disk space on your computer, use any of the following methods:

  1. Delete Stored Files

You can remove files stored on your hard disk that you do not use. To do so, follow these steps:

Double-click My Computer, right-click the hard disk on which you want to free space, click Properties, and then click Disk Cleanup on the General tab.
On the Disk Cleanup tab, click to select the check boxes of the files that you want to remove, click OK, click Yes, and then click OK.
Remove Windows Components

You can free more hard disk space by removing optional components that you do not use. To do so, use the following steps.

  1. Double-click My Computer, right-click the hard disk on which you want to free space, click Properties, and then click Disk Cleanup on the General tab.
  2. On the More Options tab, click Clean Up under Windows Components.

If a component's check box is shaded, only some of the components are installed. If you want to see what is included in the component, click to select the component, and then click Details. If you want to remove components, click to clear the check boxes of the components that you do not want to use, click OK, click OK, and then click OK.

Remove Installed Programs

You can free hard disk space by removing programs that you do not use. To do so, use the following steps:
  1. Double-click My Computer, right-click the hard disk on which you want to free space, click Properties, and then click Disk Cleanup on the General tab.
  2. On the More Options tab, click Clean Up under Installed Programs.
  3. On the Install/Uninstall tab, click the program that you want to remove, and then click Add/Remove. Follow the instructions on your screen to remove the program.

Repeat step 3 to remove additional programs, click OK, click OK, and then click OK.

Convert Hard Disk to FAT32 File System

See Fat32 and Large Disk Support above.

ScanDisk Tool (Scandskw.exe)

When you use the ScanDisk disk-checking and repair tool, you can check the integrity of your media (which includes hard disks and floppy disks), and repair most problems that may occur.

Windows 98 starts ScanDisk automatically when the operating system is shut down improperly or your disk contains a critical error. When ScanDisk starts automatically, any files damaged on your disk after improper shutdown are automatically corrected and unused disk space is recovered.

When you use ScanDisk, the following configuration settings are available:

Type of Test

Standard: Use this option to check files and folders for errors.

Thorough: Use this option to perform the Standard test and also scan your disk for physical errors. ScanDisk may take a long time to check your disk for errors depending on the size of your disk. If you use the Thorough option, the following ScanDisk configuration settings are available when you click Options:

Areas of the Disk to Scan:

If you want use ScanDisk to check your entire disk for physical damage, including both its system and data areas, click System and Data Areas. If you want ScanDisk to check only the system area on your disk, click System Area Only. Errors in the system area of your disk may indicate that your disk needs to be replaced. ScanDisk usually cannot repair errors in the system area. If you want ScanDisk to check only the data area of your disk, click Data Area Only.

Additional Surface Scan Features:

If you do not want ScanDisk to verify that sectors can be read from and written to on your disk, click the Do Not Perform Write-Testing check box to select it. If you do not want ScanDisk to repair hidden and system files on your disk, click the "Do not repair bad sectors in hidden and system files" check box to select it.

ScanDisk Advanced Options

When you click Advanced, the following configuration settings are available: 

Display Summary: You can use ScanDisk to display a summary each time ScanDisk finishes checking your disk. The summary provides information about the disk and displays whether ScanDisk detected or repaired any errors. If you want to display the summary each time ScanDisk finishes checking your disk, click Always. If you do not want ScanDisk to display the summary after checking your disk, click Never. If you want to display the summary only when ScanDisk locates errors, click Only If Errors Found.

Log File: You can use ScanDisk to store a history of ScanDisk events in a log file named Scandisk.log. If you want to replace the Scandisk.log file each time ScanDisk is used, click Replace Log. If you want to save information in the Scandisk.log file each time ScanDisk is used, click Append To Log. The Scandisk.log file is stored in the root folder of your hard disk. You can view the Scandisk.log file with any text editor (such as Notepad). If you do not want ScanDisk to create a log file, click No Log.

Cross-linked Files: You can use ScanDisk to locate cross-linked files. A cross-link occurs when two or more files use the same cluster (area of a disk) at the same time. If you want ScanDisk to remove any cross- linked files it locates on your disk, click Delete. If you want ScanDisk to make separate copies of the cross-linked files in separate locations on your disk, click Make Copies. If you do not want ScanDisk to detect cross-linked files on your disk, click Ignore.

Lost File Fragments: You can use ScanDisk to detect file fragments that are not in use by programs. File fragments are parts of files on your disk that were lost by a program. If you want ScanDisk to remove file fragments to recover space on your disk, click Free. If you want Scandisk to save file fragments, click Convert To Files. When you save file fragments to your disk, the file fragments are converted to file names such as File0000.chk and are stored in the root folder of your disk. You can use any text editor (such as Notepad) to view the saved file. This file may or may not contain any useful information.

Check Files For: You can use features included with ScanDisk to verify file names, file dates and times, and locate duplicate files on your disk. If you want to locate files on your disk that may contain invalid names, click the Invalid File Names check box to select it. If you want to locate files that may have invalid dates and times, click the Invalid Dates And Times check box to select it. If you want to locate duplicate files on your disk, click the Duplicate Names check box to select it.

Additional ScanDisk Features: You can use additional ScanDisk configuration settings to scan a compressed volume for errors before checking the disk, or locate MS-DOS-mode name-length errors that may have occurred with long file names. Errors on a compressed drive are often caused by errors on its host drive. If you want ScanDisk to scan the host drive before scanning the disk, click the Check Host Drive First check box to select it. If you want ScanDisk to report MS-DOS- mode name-length errors, click the "Report MS-DOS mode name length errors" check box to select it.

Automatically Fix Errors

If you want ScanDisk to repair most errors automatically without any prompts, click the Automatically Fix Errors check box to select it.

How to Run ScanDisk

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click ScanDisk.
  2. Select the options and features you want to use, and then click Start.

System Configuration Utility Advanced Troubleshooting Settings

To start the System Configuration Utility and view the advanced troubleshooting settings, use the following steps:

  1. Click Start, and then click Run.
  2. In the Open box, type "msconfig" (without quotation marks), and then click OK.
  3. Click Advanced.

Advanced Troubleshooting Settings

Disable System ROM Breakpoint:

This setting specifies whether Windows 98 should use Read Only Memory (ROM) address space between F000:0000 and 1 megabyte (MB) for a break point. Windows normally searches this address space to find a special instruction that is used as a system break point. If this address space contains something other than permanently available ROM, you should disable this setting. This sets "SystemROMBreakPoint=0" in the System.ini file. This is equivalent to starting Windows with the command-line switch "/d:s".

Disable Virtual HD IRQ:

This setting prevents Windows 98 from terminating interrupts from the hard disk controller and bypassing the ROM routine that processes these interrupts. Some hard disk drives may require this setting to be enabled for interrupts to be processed correctly. If this setting is enabled, the ROM routine handles the interrupts, which can slow system performance. This sets "VirtualHDIRQ=0" in the System.ini file. This is equivalent to starting Windows with the command-line switch "/d:v".

EMM Exclude A000-FFFF:

This setting prevents Windows from trying to scan for unused memory address space. This also disables the Random Access Memory (RAM) and ROM search instructions for the memory address space. This scanning can interfere with some devices that use the same memory addresses. This sets "EMMExclude=a000-ffff" in the System.ini file. This is equivalent to starting Windows with the command-line switch "/d:x".

Force Compatibility Mode Disk Access:

This setting prevents all 32-bit disk drivers from being loaded except the floppy driver. You may want to enable this setting if your computer does not start due to disk peripheral input/output (I/O) problems. If you enable this setting, all I/O uses real-mode drivers or the basic input/output system (BIOS). Also, all disk drives that are functional in protected mode only, no longer function. This is equivalent to starting Windows with the command-line switch "/d:f".

VGA 640 x 480 x 16:

This setting causes Windows 98 to use the standard VGA display adapter driver. This disables the existing "display.drv=" line of the System.ini file, and adds the "display.drv=vga.drv" line to the [boot] section of the System.ini file.

Use SCSI Double-Buffering:

Some Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) drives may require that this setting be enabled. Windows 98 should detect whether or not this setting is needed, so you should only enable this setting if there is a disk access problem. This adds the line "Doublebuffer=2" to the Msdos.sys file. This setting is unavailable if a Doublebuffer line already exists in the Msdos.sys file.

Disable Scandisk After Bad Shutdown:

This setting adds the line "Autoscan=0" to the Msdos.sys file. This can be useful when you troubleshoot shutdown issues, as it decreases startup time after a bad shutdown.

Limit Memory to <x> MB:

This setting limits memory usage on your computer to the first <x> MB, where <x> is a number of megabytes. This setting adds the "MaxPhysPage=<nnn>" line to the System.ini file, where <nnn> is a hexidecimal value of the amount of memory to be used. If this setting is too low (16 MB or lower), it may prevent Windows 98 from starting normally.

Disable Fast Shutdown:

This setting disables Windows 98 shutdown performance enhancements. This can be useful to troubleshoot problems shutting down Windows 98.

Disable UDF File System:

This setting disables support for the Universal Disk Format (UDF) file system for all removable media. This setting can be used to troubleshoot problems with proprietary DVD players that may be incompatible with UDF.

Enable Pentium F0 (Lock CmpXchg):

This setting provides a method to work around an erratum in the Intel P5 series of processors (Pentium and Pentium MMX). The processor stops responding (hangs) if a particular illegal instruction sequence is issued. This issue should not occur with a normal program, it would have to be generated maliciously. If this setting is enabled, Windows 98 enables a protection routine to avoid hanging. This setting can interfere with some kernel mode applications (such as debuggers), so it should not be used while debugging programs.

NOTE: Norton Utilities 3.0 SpeedDisk and UnErase Wizard tools lock the computer if used with this setting enabled. If you have Norton Utilities, Microsoft recommends that you do not use this setting, or disable Norton Utilities from startup.

For additional information about file system troubleshooting settings, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: ARTICLE-ID: Q165503  TITLE : Description of the File System Troubleshooting Options

For additional information about troubleshooting memory issues, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: ARTICLE-ID: Q134503  TITLE : Parity Error Messages May Indicate Bad Memory

For additional information about the Msdos.sys file, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: ARTICLE-ID: Q118579  TITLE : Contents of the Windows Msdos.sys File.

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VCache Settings

With Windows 98 it's not necessary to set Vcache to limit ram "space" for applications. Win98 is a lot more aggressive in the way it handles ram and virtual memory. They seem to have figured it out. However if you want to set it, it will normally be set for 25% of system ram with a swap file(virtual memory) at two and one half times you ram. Play around with it until your system works like you want it.

To have Windows 98 manage your virtual memory settings;

  1. Click Start, click Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click System.
  2. In the System Properties dialog box, click the Performance tab, and then click Virtual Memory.
  3. Click Let Windows manage my virtual memory settings (recommended), and then click OK.
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Copyright 1996-98 Richard Mask
Last revised: November 26, 2000.F