Abandoned & Little-Known Airfields:

Eastern Oklahoma

© 2002, © 2014 by Paul Freeman. Revised 4/18/14.

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Garland Airport / Garland-Clevenger Airport / Tulsa Commercial (1st location) / Mayo Airport / Brown Airport (revised 6/10/13)

Hatbox Field (revised 4/12/14) - Jensen Airport (revised 4/18/14) - Nash Municipal Airport (revised 5/19/12)

Sequoyah Park Airport (revised 5/19/12) - Tulsa Commercial (2nd location) / Cherokee Airpark (revised 1/20/10)

Tulsa North Airport / Downtown Airpark (revised 5/19/12) - Wilcox Airport / Collier Airport (added 3/11/14)

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Wilcox Airport / Collier Airport, Tulsa, OK

36.16 North / 95.85 West (East of Downtown Tulsa, OK)

Wilcox Airport, as depicted on a 1934 Airway Map (courtesy of Carl Gregory).



According to Carl Gregory, this small general aviation airport had its genesis on 3/30/29,

when “Homer Frank Wilcox incorporated H.F. Wilcox Aeronautics, Inc.

The other 2 persons on the incorporation papers were R. Berry & W. A. Collier (according to the Oklahoma Corporation Commission).

[On] 5/25/29 H. F. Wilcox leased the land at the southwest corner of Admiral & Garnett Road from R. L. Davis

to establish an airfield at that location (NE/4 Section 6 T19N R14E) (according to the Tulsa County Clerk records Book 842 Page 383).”



Carl Gregory reported, “[Circa] 1930 a chamber brochure on aviation in Tulsa showed the landing field & described the flying school (Collier had moved from Ponca City).

[On] 5/14/30 H.F. Wilcox re-incorporated in Delaware rather than Oklahoma (according to the OK Corporation Commission & Delaware Corporation Commission).”



Carl Gregory reported, “[On] 11/18/31 William Collier incorporated the Collier School of Aeronautics

(the other 2 officers were C Lynch & James Lynch).”



The 1934 Commerce Department Airway Bulletin (courtesy of Carl Gregory)

described Wilcox Airport as a commercial field located 8 miles east of the center of the city on Federal Drive,

adjacent to the Lake Side Country Club.

The field was said to consist of a rectangular 2,616' x 1,980' sod property with a hangar in the northwest corner.



The earliest depiction which has been located of Wilcox Airport

was on a 1934 Airway Map (courtesy of Carl Gregory).

It depicted Wilcox as a commercial/municipal airport.



According to Carl Gregory, on “3/3/39 Wilcox purchased the land in Section 11 of T20N R15E (according to the County Clerks office).”



An undated photo of a Collier CA-1 Ambassador biplane at Wilcox Airport (courtesy of Carl Gregory).

According to Carl Gregory, “The Collier Ambassador, the CA-1 Ambassador, and the Collier T-21-1 were all constructed by Collier at [Wilcox Airport].

Collier also operated under the name Collier Aircraft Sales.”



An April 1941 plan (courtesy of Carl Gregory) depicting expansion at Tulsa Airport also showed the proximity of “Collier Airport”, depicted as a square property outline to the southeast.



According to Carl Gregory, on “By 1942 the field in Tulsa [Wilcox Airport] was closed & H. F. Wilcox had moved the field to Verdigris.”



A 1944 Sectional Chart (courtesy of Carl Gregory) no longer depicted Wilcox Airport.



The last photo which has been located of Wilcox Airport was a 6/13/53 USGS aerial view.

The field had a single grass north/south runway, with a segmented circle on the northwest side & 1 hangar on the southeast side.



The last depiction which has been located of Wilcox Airport was on the 1955 USGS topo map.

It depicted a single unpaved north/south runway, labeled simply as “Landing Field”, with 1 small building on the southeast side.



The 1968 USGS topo map depicted residential streets covering the site of Wilcox Airport.



A 1995 UGGS aerial view depicted no trace of Wilcox Airport.



An 8/9/12 aerial view showed no trace remaining of Wilcox Airport.



Thanks to Carl Gregory for pointing out this airfield.



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Nash Municipal Airport, Hugo, OK

34.02 North / 95.49 West (Northeast of Dallas, TX)

Nash Airport, as depicted on the February 1959 Little Rock Sectional Chart (courtesy of David Brooks).

 

Nash Municipal Airport was evidently established at some point between 1950-59,

as it was not yet listed among active airfields in the 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock)

nor depicted on the 1950 USGS topo map.

The earliest depiction of Nash Municipal Airport which has been located

was on the February 1959 Little Rock Sectional Chart (courtesy of David Brooks).

The Aerodromes table on the chart described Nash as having a 2,300' turf runway.



Damon Nash reported, “Nash Field is named after [his grandfather] Homer Nash &/or his brothers Gene & Ray.

I flew as a tadpole out of there in the 1950s with Gran (Homer). He was the fire chief.”



Nash’s runway was still described as turf on the 1963 Sectional Chart (according to David Brooks).



The runway at Nash was evidently paved at some point between 1963-65,

as the 1965 Sectional Chart (according to David Brooks) described Nash as having a 2,900' asphalt runway.



The 1971 USGS topo map depicted Nash Airport as having a single paved north/south runway.



The 1971 Flight Guide (courtesy of David Brooks)

depicted Nash Municipal Airport as having a single 2,960' paved Runway 17/35.

Four small buildings were located along the southwest side of the runway.



The 1974-75 OK Airport Directory (courtesy of David Brooks)

depicted Nash Municipal as having a single 2,960' asphalt Runway 18/36.

The field was said to offer storage, tiedowns, and fuel.

The airport's “proponent” was listed as Hugo Aviation.



The 1977 DFW Sectional Chart (courtesy of David Brooks)

depicted Nash as having a single 2,900' paved runway.



Nash Municipal Airport was still depicted on the 1981 USGS topo map.



The last chart depiction which has been located of Nash as an active airfield

was on the 1985 DFW Sectional Chart (according to David Brooks).



In 1985, the new Stan Stamper Municipal Airport was opened on the northwest side of Hugo,

presumably replacing Nash Municipal Airport

(although the reason for this is not obvious, as Stamper's runway is only 500' longer than Nash's runway).



Nash Municipal Airport was evidently abandoned at some point between 1985-91,

as it was depicted as an abandoned airfield on the 1991 DFW Sectional Chart (courtesy of David Brooks).



The location of the 3 airports around Hugo,

as annotated by David Brooks on the 1995 USGS aerial picture.



As seen in the 1995 USGS aerial photo, the majority of the former runway at the former Nash Municipal Airport was still intact,

although a building has been built over the very south end of the strip.

It appeared as if all of the former airport buildings had been removed.



A 4/15/08 aerial view looking northwest at the former Nash Municipal Airport,

showing that the majority of the runway had been reused as a street.



The site of Nash Municipal Airport is located northeast of the intersection of East Kirk Street & 16th Street.

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Sequoyah Park Airport (7F4), Wagoner, OK

35.91 North / 95.24 West (Southeast of Tulsa, OK)

Sequoyah Park Airport, as depicted on the February 1959 Little Rock Sectional Chart (courtesy of David Brooks).

 

This little airport within the bounds of the Sequoyah State Park was apparently established at some point between 1957-59,

as it was not yet depicted on the 1957 World Aeronautical Chart (according to David Brooks).

The earliest depiction of Sequoyah Park Airport which has been located

was on the February 1959 Little Rock Sectional Chart (courtesy of David Brooks).

It depicted the field as having a 2,500' hard-surface runway.



The January 1965 Little Rock Sectional Chart (according to Chris Kennedy)

still depicted Sequoyah Park Airport as having a 2,500' hard-surface runway.



The runway at Sequoyah Park had been slightly lengthened at some point between 1965-66,

as the 1966 AOPA Airport Directory (according to David Brooks)

described the field as having a single 3,000' asphalt Runway 17/35.

It was described as being unattended and had tie-downs, but no hangar.

The airport was operated by the Sequoyah State Park.



The 1970 AOPA Airport Directory (according to David Brooks)

described Sequoyah Park Airport in the same fashion.



A 1972 USGS aerial photo depicted Sequoyah Park Airport as having a single north/south runway.



The 1974 USGS topo map depicted a single north/south “Landing Strip”.



The 1974-75 OK Airport Directory (courtesy of David Brooks)

depicted Sequoyah Park Airport as having a single 3,000' asphalt Runway 17/35

(although it also said “Airport to be expanded”).

The airport's “proponent” was listed as Rex Presley.



The January 1995 DFW Sectional Chart (courtesy of David Brooks)

depicted Sequoyah Park Airport as having a single 3,300' paved runway.



In the 1995 USGS aerial photo, Sequoyah Park Airport was evidently still open – as one single-engine aircraft was parked on the ramp.



Sequoya Park Airport was apparently closed (for reasons unknown) at some point between 1995-2001,

as it was reported closed as of June 2001,

and it was no longer depicted at all on the 2003 Sectional Chart (according to David Brooks).



A 4/15/08 aerial view looking southeast at the former Sequoyah Park Airport ,

showing the runway & ramp to remain completely intact.



The site of Sequoyah Park Airport is located west of the intersection of P50 & P52.

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Jensen Airport, South Coffeyville, OK

36.99 North / 95.63 West (North of Tulsa, OK)

Jensen Airport, as depicted on the October 1941 Tulsa Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

 

Jensen Airport was apparently established at some point between 1938-41,

as it was not yet listed in the Airport Directory Company's 1938 Airports Directory (according to Chris Kennedy).

The earliest reference to Jensen Airport which has been located

was on the October 1941 Tulsa Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy),

which depicted Jensen as a commercial or municipal airport.



The earliest photo which has been located of Jensen was a 10/15/43 aerial view looking north

from the 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock).

It depicted “Jensen Commercial Airport” as having 3 grass runways, with several hangars on the northeast side.



The April 1944 US Army/Navy Directory of Airfields (courtesy of Ken Mercer)

described Jensen as having a 3,400' unpaved runway.



The 1945 AAF Airfield Directory (courtesy of Scott Murdock) described “Jensen Commercial Airport”

as a 283 acre irregularly-shaped property having 3 sod runways, the longest being the 3,150' north/south strip.

The field was said to have 2 metal 152' x 32' hangars, and to be owned & operated by private interests.



The 1946 Kansas River World Aeronautical Chart (courtesy of John Price)

depicted Jensen as a commercial/municipal airport.



According to Chris Decker, “Jensen Airport was originally where Funk Aircraft was located [circa 1950s].

Funk aircraft moved to Coffeyville after a fire destroyed the manufacturing facilities.”



Jensen Airport apparently gained a paved runway at some point between 1945-63,

as the 1963 OK Airport Directory (courtesy of Chris Kennedy)

described Jensen as having a single 3,100' asphalt Runway 17/35.

The aerial photo also appeared to have indicated the possible presence of former grass runways

oriented northeast/southwest & northwest/southeast, as well.

A single hangar was depicted on the northeast corner of the field.

No aircraft were visible parked on the field.

The operator was listed as Roy Richardson.



The 1965 Tulsa Sectional Aeronautical Chart depicted Jensen as having a 3,100' unpaved runway.



The 1972 USGS topo map depicted the “Jensen Landing Field” as having a single north/south runway.



The 1976 AOPA Airport Directory (courtesy of Chris Kennedy)

described Jensen as having a single 3,100' blacktop Runway 17/35.

The field was said to offer hangars & tiedowns, but was unattended.

 

Jensen Airport was apparently closed (for reasons unknown) at some point within the next 4 years,

as it was not listed in the 1980 Flight Guide (according to Chris Kennedy).



The 1980 USGS topo map depicted the “Jensen Landing Field” as having a single north/south runway.



The 1981 USGS topo map depicted a single north/south “Landing Strip”.



In the 1995 USGS aerial photo, the former runway & hangar still remained in quite good condition.



A 2002 aerial photo showed the Jensen Airport site remained in the same condition.



A 2003 aerial photo showed that the runway pavement had been removed at some point between 2002-2003.



A 2005 photo by Chris Decker of the large former hangar at Jensen Airport, marked with “Jencast” on its roof.

Chris reported, “The large hangar on the north end of the field in still there,

there are also the 2 smaller hangars to the south of the large hangar.”



A 2005 photo by Chris Decker of the site of Jensen Airport.

Chris reported, “There is no asphalt [remaining], however the former runway is clearly visible and planted in row crops.”



A 4/15/08 aerial view looking southeast showed the hangar remained intact, and the runway outline was still recognizable, although the pavement had been removed.



The site of Jensen Airport is located southwest of the intersection of Interstate Street & Osage Street.

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Tulsa North Airport / Downtown Airpark (5F2, OK12), Tulsa, OK

36.2 North / 96 West (North of Downtown Tulsa, OK)

"Tulsa North" Airport, as depicted on the 1945 Tulsa Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

 

This small general aviation field was originally known as Tulsa North Airport.

It was apparently built at some point between 1944-45,

as it was not listed among active airfields in the 1944 US Army/Navy Directory of Airfields (courtesy of Ken Mercer)

nor depicted yet on the September 1944 Tulsa Sectional Chart (courtesy of Dallam Oliver-Lee).

The earliest reference to the field which has been located

was on the 1945 Tulsa Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

 

The 1949 Wichita Sectional Chart (according to Chris Kennedy)

described Tulsa North Airport as having a 2,500' unpaved runway.

 

The Aerodromes table on the 1950 Wichita Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy)

described "Tulsa North" as having a total of 4 unpaved runways, with the longest being 2,400'.

 

An explanation for this came from Mike Sheehan, who recalled, “About 1953-55 there were drag races at Tulsa North.

The runway was asphalt & the dragsters tore up one end of the runway.

The drag races were moved to Browns or another airport.”



The runway length had decreased by the time of the 1955 Tulsa Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy),

which described the longest runway at Tulsa North as being a 2,100' unpaved strip.



The 1956 USGS topo map depicted Tulsa North Airport as having a single paved northeast/southwest runway,

with 4 rows of hangars along the southeast side.



An undated (circa late 1950s?) advertisement for “Al Kobel's New Tulsa North” Airport,

with an aerial view looking north showing a single paved runway & several rows of hangars.



By the time of the 1960 Jeppesen Airway Manual (courtesy of Chris Kennedy),

the runway configuration at Tulsa North had been upgraded to a single 3,000' asphalt Runway 1/19,

with a parallel taxiway on the east side.

Several rows of T-hangars were depicted on the southeast side of the field.

 

The 1962 AOPA Airport Directory described Tulsa North as having a single 3,000' asphalt Runway 3/21,

and listed the operator as A.E. Kobel.



At some point between 1962-63 it was renamed Downtown Airpark,

as that is how it was listed in the 1963 OK Airport Directory (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

It described the field as having a single 3,000 asphalt Runway 3/21.

At least 5 rows of T-hangars were depicted on the southeast side of the field,

and about a dozen aircraft were visible on the field in the aerial photo.

The operator was listed as Ray McCurdy.

 

Allied Helicopter Service formed a flight school in 1966 at Tulsa (apparently at the Downtown Airpark),

forming Allied Helicopter International, utilizing the Bell 47 helicopter for training.

 

The 1982 AOPA Airport Directory (courtesy of Ed Drury)

described Downtown Airpark as having a 3,000' asphalt Runway 2/20 & a 1,800' turf Runway 9/27.

The operators were listed as Tulsa Downtown Airpark Inc., G & S Aviation, and Allied Helicopter Inc.



The 1983 USGS topo map depicted the “Downtown Airpark”

as having a single northeast/southeast runway, taxiways, and several hangars.



A winter 1994 photo by Rudolph Fahlhaber of a Allied Helicopter Bell 47 at Tulsa Downtown Airpark.



In the 1995 USGS aerial photo, the facilities at Downtown Airpark appeared to be quite well developed,

as 4 large hangars had been added on the ramp on the east side of the runway at some point between 1963-95,

in addition to the large number of T-hangars on the southeast side.

However, the airport did not appear very well used,

as a total of only 5 aircraft were visible parked outside.



Downtown Airpark, as depicted on a 1998 Sectional Chart.

 

Downtown Airpark was still listed (for the last time) as an active airfield in the 2000 AOPA Airport Directory.

The crosswind grass runway had been closed,

as the sole runway was listed as the 2,965' asphalt Runway 2/20.

The operator was listed as Allied Helicopter Inc.

 

Downtown Airpark apparently closed within the next year (for reasons unknown),

as it was not listed among active airfields in the 2001 AOPA Airport Directory.

 

The Tulsa Technology Center had a hangar at Downtown Airpark,

but this was moved to the R. L. Jones (Riverside) Airport (according to Kristopher Crook).

 

A 2004 photo by Kristopher Crook, looking north at the former Downtown Airpark,

with the runway visible at left.

The large hangar at right is part of the former Tulsa Technology Center campus.

 

A 2004 photo by Kristopher Crook of the Allied Helicopter Service hangar

and abandoned T-hangars, viewed from just off 36th Street North.

 

A 2004 photo by Kristopher Crook of the former Tulsa Technology Center hangar

and the Tulsa Police Department air operations building - note the police cars in from & the windsock in back.

 

As of 2004, the former Downtown Airpark is still listed with the FAA as a private heliport,

named Allied Heliport (OK12),

with a total of 8 helicopters listed as being based at the field.

It is owned by Allied Helicopter Service Inc.,

which apparently continues to operate flight training, tour flights, pipeline patrol, power line patrol,

news gathering, photo flights, air taxi, and charter flights,

using Bell 47 & 206 helicopters.



An April 30, 2005 aerial view by Danny Fritsche looking south at the former Tulsa Downtown Airpark.



A circa 2006 aerial view looking east at the large hangars on the northeast side of Downtown Airpark.

What a shame to see such extensive (and relatively recent-construction) aviation infrastructure going complete unused.

According to David Wilson, the buildings are (from left to right):

welding, airframe hangar, airframe classrooms, lunch room, powerplant classrooms, powerplant hangar.



A circa 2006 aerial view looking west at the hangars (& remains of hangars) on the southeast side of Downtown Airpark.

Note the single Bell 47 helicopter visible at the bottom, parked in between the hangars marked “Allied Helicopter Service”,

the sole aviation operator remaining at the field.



According to “Tulsa's Forgotten Airports”, the Downtown Airpark property

was owned by Tulsa Technology Center until 2006 when it was sold to an investor group.

In an ironic & historic turn, the 100 acre property - which was within the original allotment of Osage Chief Peter Bigheart -

was purchased by The Osage Nation in 2008.”



The site of Downtown Airpark is located northeast of the intersection of North Osage Drive & East 36th Street North.

 

Thanks to Chris Kennedy for pointing out this airfield.

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Garland Airport / Garland-Clevenger Airport /

Tulsa Commercial Airport (1st location) /

Mayo Airport / Brown Airport, Tulsa, OK

36.09 North / 95.9 West (South of Downtown Tulsa, OK)

An undated advertisement for the Garland Airport (courtesy of Carl Gregory).



According to Carl Gregory, an article in the 10/30/29 issue of The Tulsa Spirit

described how Robert F.F. "Bob" Garland's new airport had opened earlier that year.

This was the original airport on the northwest corner of 51st & Sheridan Road.



An October 10, 1929 letter (courtesy of Carl Gregory) described the “Garland School of Aeronautics”.

The firm was a dealer for Bellanca, Stearman, Consolidated, and Fleet.



An undated photo of a building labeled “Garland Aircraft” (courtesy of Carl Gregory).



The field later became Garland-Clevenger Airport.



According to an article in an October 1931 issue of the Tulsa World

the Garland airport merged with McIntyre Airport Company.

The outlay for the merger was $350,000.



At some point the airport was then renamed as Tulsa Commercial Airport.



The earliest depiction of the Tulsa Commercial Airport at this location which has been located

was on the 1934 Airway Map, which depicted "Tulsa Com" as a commercial or municipal airport.

 

At some point between 1934-37, the Tulsa Commercial Airport had relocated a few miles to the southwest,

as the Airport Directory Company's 1937 Airports Directory (courtesy of Bob Rambo)

described Tulsa Commercial Airport as being located 5.5 miles southeast of Tulsa,

which is consistent with the field's 2nd location.



The Airfield Directory Company's 1939 Airfield Directory (courtesy of Carl Gregory) had an aerial view looking northeast,

showing “Tulsa Commercial” to consist of a 160 acre sod field, measuring 2,640' per side,

with 2 hangars on the south side.

The field was said to be located 5.5 miles southeast of Tulsa.



By the time of the October 1941 Tulsa Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy),

the Tulsa Commercial Airport was depicted in its new location to the southwest,

and nothing was depicted at the airfield's original location.

 

At some point between 1941-44, a new airfield was apparently reopened at this location,

as the April 1944 US Army/Navy Directory of Airfields (courtesy of Ken Mercer)

described a "Mayo" Airport at this location, with a 2,600' unpaved runway.



"Mayo" was depicted as an auxiliary airfield at this location

on the September 1944 Tulsa Sectional Chart (courtesy of Dallam Oliver-Lee).



"Mayo" was depicted as an auxiliary airfield at this location

on the March 1945 Tulsa Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



According to “Tulsa's Forgotten Airports”,

after serving as a bank president & an oil executive”, Walter Brown “acquired the Mayo airfield & facilities in 1946.

He constructed several hangars on the 160 acre airport & operated Browns Flying Service.”



"Brown" was depicted as a commercial or municipal airport on the September 1946 Tulsa Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



According to “Tulsa's Forgotten Airports”,

Walter Brown leased Brown Airport “until 1949. After he retired, it was still called Brown Airport.”



A 1951 photo by Art Brown of the control tower & a hangar at Brown Airport (courtesy of Robert Brown).



Bill Buck recalled, "At the time I was flying there (1951-56) George Mace operated Brown Airport

but Gleason-Romans also had an operation there on the West end of the field.

I used to rent planes from George & used instructors based at his operation.

When I went to take my flight exam the FAA inspector would not ride in the plane I had rented from George

but made me rent a plane from Gleason-Romans.

The inspector didn't trust George or any plane that he would rent.

George also had a habit of renting planes he didn't own out to people without the knowledge of the owner...

I found out about that because I was one of the people renting them."



A 4/16/54 USGS aerial view depicted Brown Airport as having 4 runways

and several buildings along the southwest side of the field.



Brown Airport was depicted on the June 1954 Tulsa USAF Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy)

as having a 3,100' unpaved runway.



Brown Airport was still depicted on the 1955 Tulsa Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).



A 1957 aerial view of Brown Airport, showing 4 hangars,

the control tower, and over 40 light aircraft (courtesy of Carl Gregory).



Brown Airport was depicted in the 1960 Jeppesen Airway Manual (courtesy of Chris Kennedy)

as having 3 active runways (with the longest being the 2,800' Runway 13/31)

in addition to a fourth, abandoned, runway.

Several buildings were depicted along the southwest side of the field.



A 1961 photo of Brown Airport, showing 2 of the hangars,

one of which is marked “Tulsa School of Aeronautics” (courtesy of Carl Gregory).



According to Kristopher Crook, "There used to be a drive-in across the street that pilots used as a means of finding the airport."

 

Brown Airport was described in the 1962 AOPA Airport Directory as having 3 sod runways,

with the longest being the 2,800' Runway 18/36.

The field was said to offer fuel, major repairs, hangars, tiedowns, and charter.

The operator was listed as the Tulsa Airport Company, Inc.

 

Brown Airport was evidently closed (for reasons unknown) at some point between 1962-64,

as it was no longer depicted on the April 1964 Tulsa Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

 

According to Kristopher Crook, "A series of videotapes was produced by the Tulsa Historical Society,

and a couple of them featured home-movie & TV footage of Brown.

The video stated that Brown was closed in the early 1960's to make way for housing."

 

As seen in the 1999 USGS aerial photo, the site of the former Tulsa Commercial / Mayo / Brown Airport has been densely redeveloped,

and there did not appear to be any remnants of the former airfield still extant.

 

Kristopher Crook reported in 2004, "My girlfriend used to live in that neighborhood

and I searched for any trace of the airport & have not found a thing.

Unlike [Tulsa] Commercial #2, nothing remains of Brown Airport today."

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Tulsa Commercial Airport (2nd location) / Cherokee Airpark, Tulsa, OK

36.08 North / 95.93 West (South of Downtown Tulsa, OK)

Tulsa Commercial Airport, as depicted in its 2nd location, on the October 1941 Tulsa Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

 

The original location of Tulsa Commercial Airport was west-northwest of Alsuma.

At some point between 1934-37, the airfield was apparently relocated (for reasons unknown) a few miles to the southwest.

 

The Airport Directory Company's 1937 Airports Directory (courtesy of Bob Rambo)

described Tulsa Commercial Airport as being located 5.5 miles southeast of Tulsa,

which evidently referred to the field's 2nd location.

The field was described as having a 2,640' square sod landing area,

with hangars which had "Commercial Airport" & "Tulsa" painted on the roof.

 

The earliest depiction of Tulsa Commercial Airport at 2nd location which has been located

was on the October 1941 Tulsa Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

 

The April 1944 US Army/Navy Directory of Airfields (courtesy of Ken Mercer)

described Tulsa Commercial Airport as having a 2,900' unpaved runway,

and indicated that Army flight operations were conducted from the field.



"Commercial" was depicted as an commercial/municipal airport

on the September 1944 Tulsa Sectional Chart (courtesy of Dallam Oliver-Lee).



Tulsa Commercial Airport apparently gained paved runways at some point between 1944-50,

as this 1950 aerial photo (courtesy of Michael Kersten) depicted the airport as having 2 paved runways (north/south & northwest/southeast),

along with what appeared to be a thinner paved runway running northeast/southwest.

Four hangars sat on the south side of the airfield.

 

The 1950 Wichita Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy) depicted Tulsa Commercial Airport as having a 3,000' paved runway.



A 1950 aerial view looking northwest at Tulsa Commercial Airport (courtesy of Carl Gregory).



A circa 1950s aerial view of Tulsa Commercial Airport, showing an unidentified single-engine plane overflying the field,

along with dozens of light aircraft on the field, and 3 hangars (courtesy of Carl Gregory).



At some point between 1950-54, the field was apparently renamed "Cherokee Airpark",

as that it how it was depicted on the June 1954 Tulsa USAF Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

The field was described as having 3 runways,

with the longest being a 3,004' concrete strip.

 

Unfortunately, Cherokee Airpark was a victim of suburban development,

and it evidently closed at some point in 1954.

By the time of the December 1954 Tulsa Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy),

Cherokee Airpark was no longer depicted at all.

 

Matthew Price recalled, "A few years ago, I learned that my neighborhood was once an airport.

Being a private pilot, it piqued my interest.

The neighborhood formerly known as Tulsa Commercial Airpark is now called Holiday Hills.

The neighborhood was started in the late 1950s.

My house sits on what used to be the narrow runway approximately 150' NE of the NW/SE runway on what is now 58th Place.

The original construction date of my house is 1957."



Dennis Allen recalled, “We moved to the Holiday Hills subdivision in January 1958.

I lived next door to the former restaurant & office.

This building was converted to a home by Jack Sigler for his family.

I remember wondering about the bricked up extra doors, large kitchen

and my mother pointed out how they had two bathrooms side by side (men & women).

I remember the leftover hangars & some out-buildings from the airport when our house was being built.

I can even remember that some of the streets had runway markings.

The north/south and crosswind runways were used as residential streets.”



Kristopher Crook provided this annotated version of the 1995 USGS aerial photo, and observed,

"The main [north/south] runway of Commercial is still there,

being used as a stretch of Urbana Avenue,

as well as the old restaurant/office which is now a private home."

 

A 1999 aerial photo of the site of Tulsa Commercial Airport (courtesy of Michael Kersten).

 

Michael Kersten observed, "Urbana Street is a portion of the former north/south runway.

In addition, East 58th Place is atop the former northwest/southeast runway

(it is especially evident as you drive through the neighborhood -

the developers apparently did not want the added expense of breaking up the runway, so they left it as is.

The portion of the street that is former runway is considerably wider than the street to the northwest or southeast."



A February 2007 photo by Dennis Allen of the former Tulsa Commercial Airport restaurant/office building, now a house.



Dennis Allen reported in 2007, “I recently visited my Mother,

who lives in the area near the former airport.

The original concrete from the crosswind runway is still in place.

The north/south runway (Urbana Avenue) has been repaved a few times over the years.

While visiting my mother I took pictures of what is left of the 2 runways.”



Dennis continued, “The main North/South runway (35/17) , now Urbana Avenue,

was intact & included some airport markings on the concrete.

The crosswind runway, now 58th Place, was largely left intact,

but the southeast end was chopped off & redirected east to connect to Urbana.

The Northwest end of the crosswind runway (58th Place) was also modified to make it curve into Quebec Ave.”



A February 2007 photo by Dennis Allen looking southeast at the former Tulsa Commercial Airport crosswind runway.

Dennis noted, “You can see the expansion joints mark the original direction of the southeast end of the crosswind runway.”



A February 2007 photo by Dennis Allen looking north along the former Tulsa Commercial Airport Runway 35.



The site of Tulsa Commercial Airport is located at the intersection of Urbana Avenue & East 61st Street South.

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Hatbox Field (HAX), Muskogee, OK

35.74 North / 95.4 West (Southeast of Tulsa, OK)

Hatbox Field was depicted on the 1929 Rand-McNally "Standard Indexed Map with Air Trails of OK" (courtesy of Chris Kennedy)

as a public airport with a radio station ("RS").



Hatbox Field was Muskogee's original municipal airport.

The date of construction of the field has not been determined.



According to Terry Hall, “The airport is a very historic airport.

The people that I talked with [at Hatbox Airport] said (and they had photos to back it up)

that this was one of the airports that the Douglas aircraft of the Army's [1924] Around the World Flight stopped.

The airport was in existence before then as I believe it was a stop on the Army's mail route.”



The earliest depiction of Hatbox which has been located

was on the 1929 Rand-McNally "Standard Indexed Map with Air Trails of OK" (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

It described Hatbox Field as a municipal airport (but operated by Air Corps),

measuring 2,900' x 2,000', and having a beacon light.



A drawing of Hatbox Field from a 1929 brochure promoting the field (courtesy of Tom Hietzman).



Plans for Hatbox Field from a 1929 brochure promoting the field (courtesy of Tom Hietzman)

showed a total of 4 planned runways, of which only 2 were built.



According to Terry Hall, the hangar closest to the runway intersection “dates to the early 1930s.

I believe Charles Lindbergh was on hand for the dedication.”



The Spartan Aviation School opened at the field in 1940.

They used the 2 large arch-roofed hangars at Hatbox.

Spartan provided primary flight training to cadets as an Army Air Forces contract flying school until 1944.



An undated (circa 1940s?) postcard showing an aerial view from looking southeast at Hatbox Field,

showing the Muskogee Division of the Spartan School of Aeronautics.



Hatbox Field was depicted on the March 1944 Little Rock Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy)

as a commercial or municipal airport (which would be appropriate if only contract military training was being conducted there).

 

Following the end of its military use, Hatbox was reused as a purely civil airfield.



The 1948 USGS topo map depicted Hatbox Field as having 2 paved runways,

with several buildings & a radio tower on the northeast side of the field.

 

An aerial view looking southwest at the flightline of Hatbox Field

from the 1950 OK Airport Directory (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

Large numbers of aircraft were visible parked on the field.

The large hangar had "Stevenson Aviation Service" painted on the roof.

The directory described Hatbox as having 2 asphalt runways:

the 3,880' northwest/southeast & 2,800' north/south strips.

The field was said to offer repairs, fuel, and hangars.

The manager was listed as Arthur Johnson.

 

Bill Buck recalled, "Jimmy Stevenson operated Hatbox & then Nathan Sams took it over from Jimmy.

During the summers & sometimes in the winter I worked for Jimmy as a lineboy & mechanics helper.

Nathan had his operations on the West side of the field near the north/south runway

and Jimmy had his on the East side after the swap.

They started out in the reverse positions on the field.

I think the swap in management must have occurred about 1954-55 or so."

 

The 1960 Jeppesen Airway Manual (courtesy of Chris Kennedy)

depicted Hatbox Field as having 2 paved runways: a 3,800' Runway 11/29 & a 2,800' Runway 17/35,

along with a ramp on the northeast side having several hangars.

 

Hatbox was described in the 1962 AOPA Airport Directory

as having 2 paved runways, and the operator was listed as the City of Muskogee.

 

The 1963 OK Airport Directory (courtesy of Chris Kennedy) described "Hatbox Downtown" Airport

as having 2 asphalt runways: 3,800' Runway 11/29 & 2,800' Runway 17/35.

Three hangars were depicted northeast of the runway intersection.

The airfield did not appear very busy, with only a few aircraft visible on the field in the aerial photo.

The operator was listed as Nathan Sams.



The 1965 Little Rock Sectional Chart (courtesy of John Price) depicted Hatbox as having a 3,800 paved runway.



Hatbox Field was depicted on the 1978 DFW Sectional Chart (courtesy of Ray Brindle)

as having 2 paved runways, with the longest being 3,800'.

 

According to Captain Don Foster (CAP),

the city of Muskogee decided to close the field to the public following a two-fatality crash of a 152 in 1998.

Limited aviation use was allowed for a time by a private firm which refurbished military surplus King Airs.

 

The 1995 USGS aerial view of Hatbox Field, taken only 5 years before the field's closure.



Terry Hall recalled, “I first encountered the airport in 1996 when I flew my Cherokee there for avionics work.

The approach from the north to the north/south runway was a descent down a hill that the VA hospital sits upon.

Quite a ride, especially when the runway in front of you is very short.”



Hatbox was completely closed in 2000, and the King Airs were moved to nearby Muskogee.

At the time of its closure the airfield consisted of 2 paved runways (the longest, 11/29, was 3,800' long), a ramp, and 3 hangars.

The city considers the field to be part of the nearby sports complex,

and the WW2-era hangar now houses a skateboard course for local youth.



Recent view of closed Runway 29 at Hatbox Field.



  

A circa 1930s former military hangar at Hatbox Field

(used until 2000 to store military surplus King Airs).

Terry Hall observed, “The hangar has tremendous character on the inside with laminated wooden beams used instead of steel.”



Other WW2-vintage former military hangars at Hatbox Field, currently used for industrial purposes.



A 2001 Army Corps of Engineers diagram of the WW2-era boundaries of Hatbox Field & its Pistol Range.



A circa 2007 photo looking southeast at the 1930s-era former military hangar at Hatbox Field, with “Sams Flying Service” still perceptible above the door.

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