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  George Stallings

Full Name: George Tweedy Stallings
Height: 73" Weight: 187 lbs.
Born: November 17, 1867 in Augusta, GA
Died: May 13, 1929 in Haddock, GA
Major League Career: 1890-1897
Managerial Debut: 1897


 
Year TM/L G W L PCT M/Y W-EXP A-E Standing
1897 PHI-N 134 55 77 0.417   47.9 7.1 10
1898 PHI-N 46 19 27 0.413   73.8 -54.8 6
1901 DET-A 136 74 61 0.548   44.9 29.1 3
1909 NY-A 153 74 77 0.490   74.8 -0.8 5
1910 NY-A 142 78 59 0.569   86.2 -8.2 2
1913 BOS-N 154 69 82 0.457   88.8 -19.8 5
1914 BOS-N 158 94 59 0.614   88.8 5.2 1 WS Winner
1915 BOS-N 157 83 69 0.546   88.8 -5.8 2
1916 BOS-N 158 89 63 0.586   72.2 16.8 3
1917 BOS-N 158 72 81 0.471   17.3 54.7 6
1918 BOS-N 124 53 71 0.427   58.9 -5.9 7
1919 BOS-N 140 57 82 0.410   62.9 -5.9 6
1920 BOS-N 153 62 90 0.408   66.6 -4.6 7
Totals 13 1813 879 898 0.495   871.9 7.1  
 


Stallings managed one of the most memorable pennant-winning teams of all time. His 1914 Miracle Braves were last on the Fourth of July before charging to the pennant, then swept the favored A's in the World Series. Stallings signed his first contract as a player with Harry Wright and the Phillies in 1887 but played in only seven ML games. He was the Tigers' first manager, but Stallings first attracted attention as a manager in 1910 when he brought the Yankees (then called Highlanders) to second place. He described his 1914 Braves team as "one .300 hitter, the worst outfield that ever flirted with sudden death, three pitchers, and a good working combination around second base." A wealthy Georgia plantation owner, he was suave in the parlor but profane and sadistic on the bench. He had a sharp, sarcastic tongue and used it freely on his players. But, with his 1914 Braves 11-1/2 games back in last place, he began using a softer psychology,telling his players they couldn't lose. They roared to the pennant, the only one Stallings ever won.

Stallings was extremely superstitious; scraps of paper or peanut shells around the dugout drove him to distraction. He hated bases on balls. An apocryphal story says that on his deathbed, he was asked what had caused his bad heart. Supposedly, he groaned, "Oh, those bases on balls!" and turned to the wall.

 


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TM/L
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W-EXP

A-E

Standing
Team and League
Games managed (including ties)
Wins
Losses
Percentage of games won
Manager/Year (The latter number indicates how many managers the team employed that year, while the former indicates the chronological position of the manager [i.e. 1-2 would mean this manager was the first of two managers during that year]).
Expected Wins. Calculated for the team based on its actual runs scored and allowed. A team that allows exactly as many runs as it scores is predicted to play .500 ball.
Actual Wins Minus Expected Wins (A measure of the extent to which a team outperformed (or underperformed) its talent. (Over time this reflects good/bad managing).
Team's final standing for the season or, in the case of multiple managers, the standings at the time the manager departed.