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Victoria One Design Class

This one design class is based on the kit boat manufactured by Thunder Tiger.  While aimed at the entry level sailor, upgrades to sails and rigging have made this small boat an agile competitor with a broad base of racing enthusiasts.  Its small footprint and 4.5 pound minimum weight make it an ideal first boat or an alternate class for the seasoned skipper.

 

Class Rules

The Victoria One Design conforms to the class rules (Victoria Class Rules Revision 8.1 (February 2002)  as maintained by the AMYA with one exception.  The AMYA registration process as specified in 6.8 Identification on Sails (2002) subsection (e) has Sail numbers assigned by the individual class Secretary.  In Canada, the CRYA maintains a central registry of all classes.  Sail number assignment is not done by class secretaries but rather Sail Numbers are assigned by the CRYA Registrar and maintained in a centralized computer data base.

 

Victoria Class Rules Revision 8.1 (February 2002)

General Description

1.0 Concept

  1.1 General

  1.2 Intent and Objective (2001)

   1.3 Loopholes (2001)

2.0 Standards

    2.1 Hull and Keel

2.2 Deck and Hatch (2001)

2.2.1 Hatch Opening (2001)

2.2.2 Drain Plugs (2001)

2.3 Rudder

3.0 Displacement and Ballast

3.1 Materials

3.2 Keel Depth (2001)

4.0 Spars (2001)

5.0 Rigging

5.1 Mast Rigging

5.1.1 Fractional Rig (2001)

5.2 Mast Crane and Backstay Bracket (2002)

5.2.1 Mast Fittings

5.3 Wind Indicators

5.4 Deck Layout (2001)

5.5 Alternate Sail Controls

6.0 Sails

6.1 - Sails

6.2 - Sail Construction

6.3 - Deleted

6.4 - Attachment Points

6.5 - Battens

6.6 - Measurement

6.7 - Foot and leach curves

6.8 Identification on Sails (2002)

6.8.1 deleted (2002)

6.8.2 deleted (2002)

7.0 Radio (2001)

Appendix #1 (2001)

APPENDIX #2 Sail Measurements

APPENDIX #3 Victoria Main

APPENDIX #3 Continued Victoria Jib

Revision 8.1 (3/27/2002)

  General Description:

Length Over All (LOA): 30.7 inches
Displacement: 4.5 pounds
Sail Area: 433 inches
Mast Height: 43 inches 

1.0 Concept

The definitions, dimensions, and restrictions listed are intended to maintain the one-design concept for this class. The rules are intended to ensure that all boats are kept as close as possible with regard to hull, deck, keel, rudder, displacement, and ballast, while allowing minor variations in sails. In these rules the word "shall" means mandatory while the word "may" is permissive. 

1.1 General

The class specification is defined by these AMYA class rules, the, manufacturer's plans at the time the kit was assembled, and any applicable rules of the AMYA, in that order of precedence. All dimensions shown on the manufacturer's plans are to be adhered to unless specifically overridden by these rules.

1.2 Intent and Objective (2001)

The Thunder Tiger Victoria is designed to be easy to sail with the least amount of trouble to owners. Only changes, which have no bearing upon boat speed allowed, except those allowed by these class rules. The Intent and Objective of the International Victoria Class Association rules are: 

a) To keep each boat as equal, simple and cost free as possible by rigidly maintaining, without deviation, the one-design features of the Victoria for class racing.
b) To encourage the use of racing tactics and sailing skills only to increase boat speed. 

1.3 Loopholes (2001)

If you think you have found a loophole, read the preceding statement again. These are the basis of the rules and cover all areas not covered in the rules. Generally, if you cannot find it listed in the rules, it is not class legal. If you are in doubt, check with the Victoria Class Association (VCA) first. Approval must be in writing.

2.0 Standards

The class shall be called the "Victoria One-Design". Boats conforming to these rules must be assembled from a kit, herein referred to as "the Kit". "The Kit" is only manufactured by Thunder Tiger.

2.1 Hull and Keel

The hull and keel shall be as supplied by the Kit. The keel may be permanently attached or removable, but must be attached to the hull as indicated by the assembly instructions. If damaged or broken a replacement keel must be obtained from the manufacturer (see Appendix #1).

2.2 Deck and Hatch (2001)

The deck shall remain as supplied by the kit, but new or different sheet access holes may be added. Hatch cover material and shape are uncontrolled. A small hole is to be allowed on the deck surface for switch control.

2.2.1 Hatch Opening (2001)

The hatch opening shape is uncontrolled, but may not exceed 150 mm in length and 90 mm in width and not exceed the molded groove indicated by the kit.

2.2.2 Drain Plugs (2001)

One Drain hole for the purpose of removing water from the hull is permissible anywhere above the waterline. The hole for the drain plug may not exceed 1/2 inch in diameter.

2.3 Rudder

The rudder shall be as supplied by the Kit. If damaged or broken a new one must be obtained from the manufacturer (see Appendix #1).

3.0 Displacement and Ballast

The minimum ready-to-sail weight shall be 4.5 pounds. The ready-to-sail weight includes radio receiver, batteries, steering servo, sail control unit, sails and rigging.

3.1 Materials

Ballast shall consist of the lead keel bulb included in the kit. Additional ballast of lead may be added to the interior of the hull if desired. If a replacement bulb is required it must be provided by the manufacturer. 

3.2 Keel Depth (2001)

The keel fin with bulb attached, and the fin secured into its recessed mounting slot in the hull, cannot exceed 7 inches in depth. This measurement is to be taken from the rear of the fin when fitted into the hull, straight down to the bottom of the bulb.

4.0 Spars (2001)

The material used for the mast and booms is not controlled. Replacement spar dimensions are stated below: 

a) The cross-section of any spar shall not exceed 3/8 inches.
b) Jib club length is not controlled. When the boat is rigged for racing, no portion of the jib boom, or attachments thereto, shall project forward of the bow of the boat while the jib boom is held on the boat's center line.
c) Main boom length, including the gooseneck fitting and any attachments, is not controlled in length.
d) Mast height, when measured from deck to the top of the cap portion of the mast crane, shall not exceed 43 inches.

5.0 Rigging

Standing rigging may use commercially available or home built fittings, fairleads, turnbuckles, screw eyes, bowsies, goosenecks, etc. The type of line or wire used for shrouds, etc. is not controlled. Reinforcements may be added under the deck at the chain-plates, backstay attachment points, sheet exit guides, and jib-stay attachment point.

5.1 Mast Rigging

A permanent backstay is required. Any of a jib-stay, forestay, jib boom counter-weight, and topping lift may be added. In no instance may the jib club (and counterweight) protrude beyond the bow of the boat, when the jib, club is held on the top centerline of the deck. The use of separate control lines for the jib and main is permissible.

5.1.1 Fractional Rig (2001)

The jib forestay must be attached to, or run through a fitting attached to the mast that is that no higher than thirty seven and one-half (37 1/2) inches measured from the deck up, straight up. That the Attachment standoff fitting, if utilized, cannot exceed one-quarter (1/4) inch

5.2 Mast Crane and Backstay Bracket (2002)

The backstay crane at the top of the mast may be constructed from any material. The shape is not controlled. Overall length shall not exceed four (4) inches.

5.2.1 Mast Fittings

The use of different or replacement mast fittings is not controlled.

5.3 Wind Indicators

The use of a wind indicator or vane on the top of the mast is allowed, and shall not be included in the restriction on mast height (see 4.0).

5.4 Deck Layout (2001)

The layout of the deck may be modified as needed to accommodate alternate control systems. Alternate deck fittings to include the jib pivot, mast step, shroud plates, rudder control linkage or other fittings pertaining to the rig or sail controls are permitted and their location is not controlled. The steering columns and wheels, winches, cleats, hatch slides, and the cockpit cover need not be utilized. The mast shall be stepped on the deck. Through deck charging jack can be used.

5.5 Alternate Sail Controls

The manner in which the main and jib sheet are controlled is left to the skipper's discretion.

6.0 Sails

See APPENDIX #2: Sail Measurements, and APPENDIX #3: Sail Control Drawing

6.1 - Sails

Sails may be of single panel or multi-paneled construction. Sail materials are unrestricted.

6.2 - Sail Construction

Corner reinforcements, broad seam reinforcements, batten pockets and battens are unrestricted as to material.

6.3 - Deleted

6.4 - Attachment Points

Halyard, downhaul, and clew outhaul attachment points shall be placed within 1 inch of each sail corner.

6.5 - Battens

Battens may be fitted to the mainsail and jib, with a maximum of three on the mainsail and two on the jib. They shall be placed so as to divide the leach into equal segments. Their maximum length shall be unrestricted.

6.6 - Measurement

Sails may be measured on or off spars.

6.7 - Foot and leach curves

Foot and leach curves shall be defined by the measurement points and faired with a constant section batten connecting corners of the sail through the intervening measurement points, with no bending in the batten induced beyond the corners of the sail.

6.8 Identification on Sails (2002)

The ISAF Identification on Sails protocol is adopted with the exception that: 

a)      Class insignia is a single letter capital V, height 52 - 57mm, Times New Roman font

b)       Sail numbers are height 77 - 82mm, Arial Bold font.

c)       International letters are height 52 - 57mm, Arial Bold font.

d)       The space between marks on opposite sides of the sail shall be 50-75mm.

e)       Sail numbers are assigned by the Class Secretary who can provide templates for all identification markings. 

6.8.1 deleted (2002)

6.8.2 deleted (2002)

7.0 Radio (2001)

A maximum of two channels shall be allowed. One channel shall be used for sail control, the other for the rudder. Standing rigging shall be adjusted only by manual means. The arrangement of radio equipment and the method of fixing radio equipment to the hull is not controlled.

 

 

Copyright 2002  - 2005 Canadian Radio Yachting Association
Last modified: November 24, 2005