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Kemp Genealogy: Ancestors and Decendants of Daniel Kemp

Biography Of Kemp's Beginning With "R"

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Biography Of Kemp's Beginning with "A"
Biographies of Kemp's beginning with "B"
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Biography of Kemp's beginning with "E"
Biography of Kemps beginning with "F" & "G"
Biography Of Kemp's Beginning with "H" To "J"
Biography Of Kemp's Beginning With "M" To "P"
Biography Of Kemp's Beginning With "R"
Biography Of Kemp's Beginning With "S"
Biography Of Kemp's Beginning With "T" to "Z"
Biography Of Kemp-Welch "A" To "Z"
Kemp Migrational TimeLine
Extracts From Hitchin-Kemp's History of the Kemp and Kempe Families
Knights of The Realm In The Family Tree
Kemp's In The Revolutionary War
THE CIVIL WAR
Gissing England
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Children and Grandchildren Of Daniel Russell Kemp
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Radalphus De Campis (Ralph Kempe)
 

"He is the first known holder of the manor of Ollantigh, which he held from 1283 to 1313. He is also the earliest known ancestor of the Wye Kempes. The theory that they were descendants of John Kempe, a Flemish weaver who settled in England under royal protection in 1313, is probably not true, because they were settled at Wye before that time."

Some English/British names deciphered:

Of the approximately 100,000 British names less than half have satisfactorily had their meanings established. However, below are a few that have been 'deciphered'

Initially in the context of the English {Angles, Saxons, Frisians and Jutes} having left their German heartland in the 5th century to conquer the land later to be called England, one if not the most interesting group of names was that given to the people already living in the land the Romans had named Britannia. The inhabitants of Britannia were Celts, kinfolk to the Celts in Cornwall, Ireland, Scotland and Wales, who were largely dispossessed by the conquering English. The English called the Celts 'foreigner, stranger' and from this epithet came the names:

Kemp, Kempe, Camp: Edmund Kempe {c1100}; Ralph le Kemp {1296} = Ralph the warrior, OE cempa, 'warrior' or occasionally 'athlete, wrestler.

OE = Old English: language of the English c5th to c14th centuries

Alden,Auden, Haldane, Halden, Hallding, Holdane: Gamal filius Alden {1196}; Goduinus Halden {1066}; Roger Haldane {1255} = Roger (the) half Dane ASc Healfdene; ON Halfdanr. The other half could have been Anglo-Saxon, Danish, Flemish, Norman, Norwegian or Swedish.

Richard Kempe 1542-1600

Richard Kempe owned the Manors of Hasting in Gissing and Flordon in Norfolk, and Burnells, Dallings and Redisham in Suffolk. He added to the family estate by purchasing the Manor, afterwards known as Gissing Hall in Roydon. The Manor of Redisham is mentioned in a deed of 1311 as belonging to the Kempe family of Weston (BM Stowe Mss, 250). This is some evidence to surrport the descent of the Norfolk family from this Suffolk root. His widow, Alice Kempe, remarried, her second husband being Edmund Poley, Gent., of Badley near stowmarket, Suffolk, on 17 Sept 1601 at Gissing church. Edmund Poley died on 31 Oct 1613, aged 69, and there is an inscription to him and other Poley family members in the church in Badley. The eldest son, Richard Kempe, the elder, was also called Robert Kempe; and was described as of Gissing, Flordon and Antingham in Norfolk. He was entered as a student at Grays Inn, London, on 9 May, 1682. He married, around 1596, to Dorothy, daughter of Arthur Harris of Cricksea and Woodham Mortimer, Essex by Dorothy, daughter of Sir William Waldegrave of Smallbridge, Suffolk and sister of Sir William Harris of Cricksea. Arthur Harris was the son of William Harris of Woodham Ferrers and Alice Smythe. Alice Smythe was the daugher of Sir John Smythe of Ostenhanger, Kent; whose brother, Sir Thomas Smythe (1558-1626) helped found the Virginia Company. He owned the manors of Hasting in Gissing and Flordon, Norfolk, also Burnells, Dalling, and Redisham in Suffolk. He added to the family estate by purchasing Gissing Hall in Roydon.

Richard Kempe 1600 Of Gissing, Norfolk Co., England

Richard Kempe was born about 1600 in Of Gissing, Norfolk, England. He was christened on 9 Oct 1603 in All Saints, Norwich, Nfk, Eng. He died about 1656. Richard was employed as Secretary of State. He was employed as Governor of Virginia in Virginia, United States. He signed a will on 1 Mar 1608 in 0f, Carisbrooke, Hampshire, England.

Will: Will probated May 13, 1714, St. Ann's Parish, left all land and four negroes to son Richard Kemp; 4 negroes, cattle and looking glass to daughter Ann Taliaferro; nearly the same to daughter Rachel Gatewood; and 4 negroes to wife Elinor. He also left 600 lbs of tobacco to Eliza Minor, Joan Guttrey, Mary Nall, Catherine Talburt. Also divides monies in hands of Col. Robert Carter; Witnessed by Thomas Ramsey, Robert Biswell, Francis Abbot, Eliza Abbot.
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http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/va/schools/wmmary/notes0012.txt
Historical Notes William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, Vol. 3, No. 1. (Jul., 1894), pp. 68-74.
Historical Notes; Wm. and Mary Qrtly., Vol. 3, No. 1

KEMPE. "Richard Kempe's will (at Somerset House, England), is dated 1649, and proved 1656. His legatees are his (Page 70). wife Elizabeth, daughter Elizabeth, 'Uncle' Ralph Wormeley, brother Edward Kemp, and nephew Edmund Kemp (who, from the gift of servants or to come in, was evidently in Va.) and various friends. When the will was proved the daughter (an infant) was dead, as was the Uncle Ralph Wormeley, and the will was proved by the widow who was then Elizabeth Lunsford. You can find out a good deed about R. Kempe from Hening and Neill, R. Wormeley, who died between 1649 and 1656, was the first Ralph Wormeley (perhaps he was the wife's uncle, and she a daughter of Christopher Wormeley). From the Visitation of Suffolk it appears that Robert Kempe, Esq., of Gissing, had issue (1) Robert, (2) Edward, (3) Richard, (4) Edmund. The eldest son Robert was created a baronet in 1614, and the title is still extant". - W. G. Stanard.
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In 1639 the first brick house was built at Jamestown. It belonged to Richard Kempe* and is referred to by Governor Harvey as "the fairest that was ever known in this country for substance and importance."
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The Custis children, Washington s step-children, are buried near the north door in the churchyard. Near Thomas Ludwell "lye the bodies of Richard Kempe, Esq., his Predecessor in ye Secretary s Office and Sir Thomas Lunsford Kt." Richard Kempe was a member of the Virginia Council in 1642 at Jamestown and Secretary of the Colony for a number of years. He officiated as governor for three years while Berkeley was in England. It was under him that the first Thanksgiving Days in the Colony, of which there is any record, were celebrated, and during whose administration it was ordered, "That the eighteenth day of April be yearly celebrated by thanksgivings for our deliverance from the hands of the salvages."
Sir Thomas Lunsford married Kempe's widow.
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Richard married (1) Dame Elizabeth WORMELEY daughter of WORMELEY Henry about 1652 in Virginia. Elizabeth was born about 1615. She died about 1652 in Virginia.

They had the following children:

KEMPE Elizabeth was born in 1652 in Christ Church Parish., Max. Co..Va. She died before 1656.

Richard married (2) HOGG Ann. Ann was born about 1617 in of Hull, Yorkshire. She died before 1652 in Virginia.

Robert (A.K.A.) Richard Kempe 1567-1612

 The eldest son, Robert Kempe, was enrolled as a student of Grays Inn on 26 Feb 1614/5, It is unlikely he ever practised as a lawyer, but it seems probably that he obtained some position at the Faculty Office, as for some years a Robert Kempe issued marriage licenses. Young and wealthy as he was, he soon found favour, with the result that he was knighted by King James I on 12 November 1618 at Theobalds, Hertfordshire, and he retired from the Faculty Office the same year. From that date he became closely attached to King James, and doubtless in the company of Sir Francis Bacon, enjoyed both pleasure and profit from the association. He eventually married Jane Browne, the heiress of Sir Matthew Browne of Betchworth Castle, on or before 1626.

From this marriage Robert Kempe secured a royal Descent for their children. their eldest son, Robert Kempe, was born at Walsingham abbey on 2 Feb 1627. Lady Kempe doubtless found Gissing Hall rather quiet after the life at London and the Court, and consequently preferred living there. When a retreat to the country was necessary she preferred antingham as a home, rather than Gissing. The Antingham resident was described as their home in 1643. Sir Robert Kempe was made a Gentleman of the Privy Chamber to Charles I and a Baronet in 1641. See: Frederick Hitchin-Kemp, Daniel William Kemp and John Tabor Kemp, A General History of the Kemp and Kempe Families of Great Britain and Her Colonies. The Leadenhall Press Ltd., London, 1902; and Noel Currer-Briggs, The Search for Mr. Thomas Kirbye, Gent., Phillimore & Co. Ltd., 1986.

Richard Kempe, the Secretary of Virginia, succeeded William Claibourne in this post. He married, as his first wife, Anne Hogg of Hull, Yorkshire, born in 1617. After her death in Virginia, he married, as his second wife, Elizabeth Wormely, the daughter of Henry Wormely of Riccall in Yorkshire, born around 1616. He made a will, dated 4 January 1649/50 and proved in the PCC on 6 December 1656. His widow, Elizabeth Lunsford, alias Kempe, was his executor. He was described as of Kich Neck, Virginia, and left to Elizabeth, his wife, all his estates in Virginia and his money. He asked Sir William Berkeley, the Governor of Virginia, to see his widow and his daughter, also clled Elizabeth Kempe, returned safely to England; and to take care that her upbringing was entrusted to Richard Kempe's uncle, Ralph Wormely.

Elizabeth Kempe (nee Wormeley), his widow, remairred to Sir Thomas Lunsford, Baronet, of London and Virginia, as his third wife; and by whom she had three children, namely Daniel Lunsofrd, Richard Lunsford, and John Lunsford. Sir Thomas Lunsford was the son of Thomas Lunsford of Bexhill, Sussex. His mother was Catherine Fludd, whose brother, robert Fludd (1574-1637), was well known as a Rosicrucian and as a physician.

They were children of Sir Thomas Fludd, Knight. "Sometimes Treasurer of War to Queen Elizabeth in France and the Low Countries", and were born in Bearstead, Kent. Robert Fludd was four times Censor of the Royal College of Physicians. He lived at Fenchurch Street and died, unmarried, on 8 Sept 1637 at his house in the parish of St. Catherine, Colman Street, London. His nephew was Thomas Fludd, or Floyd, of Gore Court, Otham, Kent. another sister married Sir Nicholas Gilbourne of Charing, Kent. Herin lies the connection to John Fludd (Flood), who emigrated to Virginia in 1610 on the Swan. After the death of Sir Thomas Lunsford in 1653, Elizabeth Lunsford (nee Wormely) remarried again to Major-General Robert Smith. Robert Smith was one of three agents, along with Francis Moryson and Thomas Ludwell sent by the Assembly of Virginia in 1676 to King Charles II to attempt to help secure passage of the Royal Charter for Virginia following Bacon's rebellion.

Robert Kempe 1591-1647

The eldest son, Robert Kempe, was enrolled as a student of Grays Inn on 26 Feb 1614/5, It is unlikely he ever practised as a lawyer, but it seems probably that he obtained some position at the Faculty Office, as for some years a Robert Kempe issued marriage licenses. Young and wealthy as he was, he soon found favour, with the result that he was knighted by King James I on 12 November 1618 at Theobalds, Hertfordshire, and he retired from the Faculty Office the same year. From that date he became closely attached to King James, and doubtless in the company of Sir Francis Bacon, enjoyed both pleasure and profit from the association. He eventually married Jane Browne, the heiress of Sir Matthew Browne of Betchworth Castle, on or before 1626.
From this marriage Robert Kempe secured a royal Descent for their children. their eldest son, Robert Kempe, was born at Walsingham abbey on 2 Feb 1627. Lady Kempedoubtless found Gissing Hall rather quiet after the life at London and the Court, and consequently preferred living there. When a retreat to the country was necessary she preferred antingham as a home, rather than Gissing. The Antingham resident was described as their home in 1643. Sir Robert Kempe was made a Gentleman of the Privy Chamber to Charles I and a Baronet in 1641. See: Frederick Hitchin-Kemp, Daniel William Kemp and John Tabor Kemp, A General History of the Kemp and Kempe Families of Great Britain and Her Colonies. The Leadenhall Press Ltd., London, 1902; and Noel Currer-Briggs, The Search for Mr. Thomas Kirbye, Gent., Phillimore & Co. Ltd., 1986.

Robert Kemp (Sir) 1627-1710
Robert Kemp was born 2 Feb 1627 in Walsingham,Abbey, , Norfolk, England to Sir Robert Kemp & Jane Browne. Robert was christened on 2 Feb 1627 at Walsingham Abbey, Norfolk, England. Robert Kemp was made Baron on 20 Aug 1647 in Norfolk England. Robert first married Mary Kerridge on 15 Jul 1650 at Shelly, Suffolk, England. They had no known children. Robert secondly married Mary SOne on 25 Nov 1657 at Holborn Saint Andrew, London, England they had six known children.
Robert died on 26 Sep 1710 in Gissing,Norfolk,England and is buried there.

Sir Robert Kemp (1628-1710), of Gissing Hall, 2nd Baronet, was MP for Norfolk from 1675-8 and MP for Dunwich, Suffolk in 1679 and 1681. His father was a lukewarm royalist during the civil war, but it was thought that Kemp had inherited his mother's more Puritan sympathies. He was a Deputy Lieutenant of Norfolk and lieutenant-colonel of militia horse from 1660-76. He was returned as MP for Norfolk at a by-election in 1675 with the support of Lord Horatio Townshend and many of the county's Dissenters. He refused to serve under Townshend's successor as Lord Lieutenant, and he was stripped of his local offices. By 1683 he appears to have swayed towards the court and was restored as a Justice of the Peace by James II. Refusing to renounce the Penal Laws in 1688 he was temporarily removed from office. He accepted the Revolution in 1689 but did not stand for Parliament again.

Residence: Gissing Hall, the ancient seat of the Hastings, whose heiress carried it in marriage to the Kemp family, was a moated mansion,* but was taken down about 1700, by Sir Robert Kemp, who removed to Ubbeston, in Suffolk. He converted the uplands and the chief part of the park into a farm, for which he built a commodious house on a more elevated spot than the old hall.