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The Family Garden

Notes


Charles SIMMONS

"Charles was in Bedford Co., VA by 1757, and appears on 1782 tax lists there.
From "Laws of VA Colonial Days", Charles Simmons is on a list of those of Bedford County giving to raise a Bedford County militia, giving 8 shillings."
*Source:  Some items from a short history by Gene Simmons of Cameron, MO.
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Will of Charles Simmons of Campbell Co, Virginia
dated 6 Apr 1792
proved 4 Sep 1794

I, Charles Simmon of C, weak in body but of perfect mind and memory
First, all my just debts and funeral charges to be paid.
To my children (to wit) James Simmons, Charles Simmons, John Simmons, Joseph Simmons, George Simmons, William Simmons, Peter Simmons, Margaret Young, and Sarah Standley - 20 shillings, to be equally divided among them.

To my son Reuben Simmons - 2 negro girls, Phillis and Eastor.

To Catharine Lestern, my housekeeper - my horses, cows, hogs, and household furniture.

To my children (to wit) James Simmons, John Simmons, Joseph Simmons, George Simmons, William Simmons, Peter Simmons, Margaret Young, and Sarah Standley - the rest of my estate, such as bonds, outstanding accounts, & etc.

Executors: my son Reuben Simmons, and Vintson Glass.
Signed - Charles (X his mark) Simmons. Wit - William Jones, John Helm, Vincent Glass Jr.

At C Court of Sep 4, 1794, the will of Charles Simmons, deceased, was proved by the oath of witness John Helm. At court of Oct 2 following, the same was further proved by the oath of Vincent Glass Jr, and or Reuben Simmons, one of the executors, was granted a certificate for obtaining probate when he shall think fit.
Order of children is estimated. All children were mentioned in his will written in 1792; no mention of his wife Sarah.
*Source:  Campbell County, Virginia Wills, 1782-1800, by T. L. C. Genealogy, P.O. Box 403369, Miami Beach, Fl, repository:  Fairfax, VA Library.  This is an extract of wills, refers to actual will being on Page 264 of Campbell County Wills, 1782-1800.
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In Ida Harper Simmons' book "Ten Generations of My Simmons Family" is this version of the will.  It appears to be an interpretation of the exact document, rather than an extract which appears above.

Ida Harper Simmons, Ten Generations of My Simmons Family History, (Copyright 1996).)

Will of Charles Simmons--Transcribed by Ida Harper Simmons
In the name of God, Amen the sixth day of April in the year of -- Lord, one thousand seven hundred and ninety two. I, Charles Simmons of Campbell County being weak in body but of perfect mind and memory thanks to be given unto God therefore calling unto mind the mortality of my body and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die do make and ordain this to be my last Will and Testament that is to say principally and first of all I give and recommend my soul into the hands of God that gave it and for my body I recommend it to the earth to be buried in a Christian like and decent manner at the discretion of my Executors nothing doubting but at the general resurrection I shall receive the same again by the mighty power of God and as lacking such worldly Estate wherewith it has pleased God to bless me in this life. I give devise and dispose of the same in the following manner and form. Imprimis it is my will and I do order that in the first place all my just debts and funeral charges be paid and satisfied.

Item: I give and bequeath unto my nine children (to wit) James Simmons, Charles Simmons, John Simmons, Joseph Simmons, George Simmons, William Simmons, Peter Simmons, Margaret Young, Sarah Standley, twenty shillings to be equally divided amongest them, to them and their heirs forever.

Item: I give and bequeath unto my son Reuben Simmons two Negroe Girls (to wit) Phillis and Easton with their increase to him and --Heirs forever.

Item: I give and bequeath to Catherine Lestern my Housekeeper my horses cows hogs and household furniture to her and heirs forever.

Item: all the rest of my estate - after debts funerall charges, etc, being satisfied not already disposed of, as bonds and out standing accounts, etc, I give and bequeath to my children (to wit) James Simmons, John Simmons, Joseph Simmons, George Simmons, Williams Simmons, Peter Simmons, Margaret Young, and Sarah Standley to them and their heirs forever. I do hereby ordain Will make constitute and appoint my son Reuben Simmons and Vinston Glass, jr. my true and lawful Executors of this my Last Will and Testament, and do hereby utterly discount revoke and disallow all and every other Wills--Testaments and legacies and Executors ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last Will and Testament. In Wittness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the Day and Year first above written.
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More About Charles Simmons:

Charles was granted:
216 acres on the southside of the Appomattox River, Amelia County, 1 Aug 1745 (patents #22, 1743-45, p. 370);
and 290 acres, both sides of Rough Creek, Amelia County, 11 Jul 1761 (patents #33, 1756-61, p. 1032).

Sold the 216 acres in 1761 "of Bedford County" to James Walker, Prince Edward Deeds Book 2, p. 57; Sarah, wife, relinquishes dower;

sold 590 acres on Rough Creek (an additional 300 acres to William Spencer 13 Feb 1765, described as being "of Bedford County" (Prince Edward Deeds Book 2, p. 275). His mark was a large "C".

Campbell County, Virginia Deeds, 1790 - 1796, Book 2, Page 57a. 14 Jul 1761 from Charles Simmons of Bedford county, to James Walker of P., for 60 lbs, a certain tract of land in P, 216 acres on the south side of Appomattox River and bounded by Henry chilesk Hill. signed Charles (M his mark) Simmons. Wit - none. Recorded 14 July 1761. Sarah, the wife of the said Charles, relinquished her right of dower to the conveyed lands.

??? Children-
Is this George the one who lived on Enoch Creek, Bedford, with wife Elizabeth? Died 1798. Or is he the George described as "Jr" who lived on Linville Creek in Bedford, later Franklin, and had wife Mary. He sold land to Joseph Simmons in 1784. Died in 1843.

Charles came to Bedford in 1761 and could be the son of John of Stafford, as he signed a note for William Scott who moved to Bedford in 1763 and who died in 1794, leaving among others a daughter Sarah.

Charles bought land of Walker in the 1760's. He had a son Joseph who married widow Agatha Walker and moved to Linville Creek in Franklin County, Va which makes a nominal connection between the Campbell County Simmons family and the Simmonses on Linville Creek.

More About Charles Simmons:
Fact: 1745, Patented land (Source: Jo Ann King Simmons.)
Fact: 1785, off tax rolls (Source: Jo Ann King Simmons.)
Fact: 1794, probated Campbell (previously Bedford, VA) (Source: Jo Ann King Simmons.)
Fact: 1760, Bought land of Walker (Source: Jo Ann King Simmons.)
location: Surry Co/Prince Edward Co/Bedford Co, VA

(Source: Ida Harper Simmons, Ten Generations of My Simmons Family History, (Copyright 1996).) military: Private in the Revolutionary War (Source: Ida Harper Simmons, Ten Generations of My Simmons Family History, (Copyright 1996).)

Profession: farmer (Source: Ida Harper Simmons, Ten Generations of My Simmons Family History, (Copyright 1996).)

****************
res. of Amelia (later Prince Edward) Va. by 1745; to Bedford 1761.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Found in my father's notes, he copied this from some unknown book.

The name Simmons is definitely of English origin.  Various attempts to trace the origin of the name have been made.  According to one source, the name Simmons, Semmons, Simmens, Simmon, simens, Simmis, Simonds, Simmonds, Simmes, Simmus, Simmions, Simmins, Simmous, Simmuns, Symons, or other variations of the name, is thought to have been derived from the Saxon batismal name CYMOND.  About the year 1200, the name began to take its modern form Simmons.  

It has been said, without proof, that Moses Simmons was probably the first of the name in America.  He migrated from Leyton, Holland, where his family had gone witht he English Pilgrims.  He arrived in Plymouth, Massachussetts on the ship "Fortune" in 1621.  He settled in Duxry, near Plymouth.........A William Simmons was born in James City County, Virginia in 1648 and died and left a will in Surry County, Virginia in 1693.  (Note, others are listed, I included this one because our Charles is from Surry county and I need to research this William.)


William SIMMONS

William married first Rebecca Holt, second Elizabeth Miles.

He moved to Galena, where he was engaged in hauling mineral ore; and later he moved to Iowa where he died. This William Simmons was the father of James Simmons, who died at the residence of his son James Edmond Simmons, on section two, September 25, 1900.

William was also the father of Sarah, who married David Young.

1810 Warren Co., KY census, pg 248-males-3 under 10,2 age 16-26, one 45 &
up. Females-one 26-45, and one 45 & up.

One researcher gives his wife's name as Elizabeth Read, dau. of John Read.

Another researcher states that William was in the VA militia in 1758, giving him a birthdate by 1740 (He had to be 18.).


James SIMMONS

James married Elizabeth Hammond on 3 Jan 1789 in Lancaster, VA


John SIMMONS

John married first Elizabeth LNU, second Lucretia Jones.


Joseph SIMMONS

Joseph married Agness Walker in 1827 in Franklin Co, VA

1772, Guardian Robert Walker's children
1775, to Linville Creek, Franklin County, Virginia
1780, 380 acres - Linville Creek - Patents (Source: Franklin County, Virginia Deed Book 6, 1811-1814, p. 70.)
1782, Bedford tax list - 287 acres
1784, Bought 200 acres of land from George Simmons
1786, Franklin County tax list 187 acres
1792, sells 279 acres to Edward Beard Linville Creek
1800, Patty Simmons, Daughter Joseph m. James Angel Franklin
April 1, 1809--Joseph Simmons and wife Agothery to Samuel Beard for 60 lbs, 100 acres. Witnessed by Stephen Simmons, Skelton Taylor, Joseph Wysong
Franklin County, Virginia Deed Book 6, 1811-1814, p. 70


George SIMMONS

George married Elizabeth LNU abt 1770 in VA?

Bedford DB 7, p. 500; Bedford Co Tax Lists - 1782-1798
Bought 400 acres Enoch's Creek 1780 Bedford DB 6, p. 399; bought 192 acres Enoch's Creek 1792, DB 9, p. 53;

December 04, 1798, will probated Bedford County, Virginia

Resided Enoch's Creek

Notes for Elizabeth:
Will - "ABSTRACTS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, TENNESSEE WILLS 1808-1875",  Published by Frances Terry Ingmire, copyright 1984
Elizabeth Simmons of Franklin county. page 221
Children: son Peter; son William; no kin given Airy (Anny) Mosely wife of Thos. F. Mosley.  Executor; son Peter Simmons
Dated: 4 Feb. 1843 Signed: Elizabeth (X) Simmons (seal)
Witness: John R. Patrick; Roberson J. Turner; Cornelitis Holder Slaves: Booker; America

Codicil: datd 21 Aug. 1843 request child born to America since will was made to go to Peter. Child's name George.
Recorded: 7 Dec. 1843 Franklin County Dec. Term 1846


Charles SIMMONS

Charles married Eleanor Weeks.


Reuben SIMMONS

Reuben married Francis Glass on 23 Jul 1779 in Bedford Co, VA

Died between 8-17-1828 and 3-1-1829 in Huntsville, Alabama

Campbell County, Virginia Deed Book 3, 1790 - 1796
Page 580 1 Oct. 1795 from Reuben simmons of C and Frances, his wife, to Francis Purdue of C, for 100 lbs, about 184 acres (it being part of 276 acres patented to Daniel Read) in C on both sides of Chockarollapin branch, a west branch of Falling River, and bounded by Powell, the patent line.
Signed - Rhubin Simmons, Francis Simmons. Wit - none. Recorded 1 Oct. 1795.

Campbell County, Virginia Deed Book 1784 - 1790
Page 113, 5 April 1785 (sic) from Moses Powell and Hannah Powell of C, to Rhubin Simmonds (Simmons), for 550 lbs, one certain tract of land of about 184 acres, it being part of the land formerly patented to Daniel Read. The land is in C on both sides of Chockarollopin Branch, which is a west branch of Falling River, and is bounded by Powell, the patent line. signed _
Moses (X his mark) Powell, Joanna (sic) (X her mark) Powell. Wit - none. Deed acknowledged by Moses Powell and Joanna, his wife. Recorded 6 april 1786.

1795, sold Campbell County, Virginia land
1785, Campbell County tax list
1784, Executor of father's estate Campbell County

Marriage Notes for Reuben Simmons and Frances Glass:
"Marriage Bonds of Bedford County, Va. 1755-1800," by Dennis & Smith 1983
States -
Reuben Simmons & Francis Glass 7-23-1779, Benjamin Tanner surety. Consent of Vincent Glass, father of Francis.


Margaret SIMMONS

Margaret married Joseph Young bef 1792.


Sarah SIMMONS

Sarah married John Standley


Mary Ann RADFORD

The document listed below has her as M. A. Russell, wife of Matthew Russell of Perry County, Alabama.  This was in 1863, so she may have married twice?
*Source:  Probate Court Records, Perry County, Alabama, Book K, pp. 115-117, Probate Court, September 29th 1863, See notes for William Radford, SR for full context.


M. L. MCMAHON

M. L. McMahon was appointed the guardian of the minor children of Reuben Radford.


Susan RADFORD

Wife of M. L. McMahon of Lauderdale County, Mississippi
*Source:  Probate Court Records, Perry County, Alabama, Book K, pp. 115-117, Probate Court, September 29th 1863, See notes for William Radford, SR for full context.


Joseph STOKES

In 1863, he was absent in Army at Vicksburg.
*Source:  Probate Court Records, Perry County, Alabama, Book K, pp. 115-117, Probate Court, September 29th 1863, See notes for William Radford, SR for full context.

Speculation:  I've wondered if he was in the Union Army, because all the other males in this deed that were in the service specifically say "Confederate Army" except for Joseph.


Sapriah C. RADFORD

I have seen her listed as Sarah in some places, but the deed has her name as Sapriah, Sarah may have been a nickname?
*Source:  Probate Court Records, Perry County, Alabama, Book K, pp. 115-117, Probate Court, September 29th 1863, See notes for William Radford, SR for full context.


James GORE

The will ofJames Gore II was written 3 Apr 1783, and proved 29 Oct 1784 . In it he names: son John Ashford Gore, son Joshua Gore, son Eleazor Gore, two grandsons Michal Donden and Davis Gore, and wife Elizabeth Gore Witnesses: George Thomas, Elisha Gore, and Michael Gore. (+son James Gore)

The inventory of the estate was made 9 Dec 1784, and the appraisers were John Pratt _____ Seely, and John Colvin. At the sale of his belongings, John Taylor  bought some tools and 2 cowhides.

James and Elizabeth's wills are both on file in Chester Co.,S.C..
James dated 3 April 1783 and Elizabeths dated 5 Nov 1788. Both mention Joshua and many others as children. The rest of thefamily moved to Johnson Co., Illinois sometime before 1820. Joshua was age 68  in 1820  
Source:  Internet

PETITIONS OF FREEHOLDERS AND FREEMEN OF ALL SAINTS PARISH MSS  IN FREDERICK COUNTY FOR ITS DIVISION INTO Two Archives:  James Gore  (signed this petition)  Date of petition 1756.
*Source:  Maryland State Archives, volume 52, page 673        

From the "Chicasaw Times Past:' James Gore II and his wife, Elizabeth, moved from Maryland to Chester County, South Carolina in 1768. Their children were James, Manning, Thomas Clement, Michael, John Ashford, Joshua, Eleazor, Notley, Mary, Easter, Sarah and Elizabeth. James Gore II died in 1784, and his will was probated in Camden, Kershaw County, south Carolina on October 29, 1784.

He is on the South Carolina Roster for the American Revolution. On Mar 8, 1779, he was put in the continental Line and served until Mar 24. He was pressed by Samuel Knight, wagon master, and served until May 3, 1779.

1784, Will of James Gore (ca 1705-1784) Kershaw Co., Wills, Will book A-1, pg.241, Recd., 29 Oct 1784. Wife: Elizabeth Sons: John ASHFORD GORE, Joshua GORE, Elizar GORE, James GORE. Grandsons: Michael DOWDEN and Davis GORE. (Within the records of Camden District, now part of Kershaw County, SC, probate Records, Apt. 18, package 981) Wit: George THOMAS, Elisha GORE, Michael GORE.

WILL OF JAMES GORE, KERSHAW COUNTY, CAMDEN DISTRICT, SOUTH CAROLINA

In the Name of God Amen I James Gore of Camden District in the provence of South Carolina being weak in body but of sound mind and disposing memory do make and ordain this y last will and testaments in manne and form Following hereby revoking all other wills and testaments by me heretofore made-Imprimis my will and desire is that all my just debyts be paid by my Executors thereafter named as soon as possible after my desacise.

Then I give and devise to my son John Ashford Gore one hundred acres of land lying on Sandy Creek being part of tract given to my son in law and the lanes end of the said tract and where he now lives to him and his heirs forever.

Item I give and devise to my son John Ashford Gore one hundred and twenty five acres of land lying on both sides of Lanes Creek it being part of a two hundred acres tract which I purchest of Zachary Isbell and lyng lowest down the said creek and join in the lands of George Tanihill with his improvement on the land to him and his heirs forever.

Item I give and devise to my son Elizar Gore fifty acres of land with the plantation where on I now live after my wife decease, and likewise the remaining parts of the above tract of two hundred acres whereon I now
live to him and his heirs forever.

Item I give and devise to my grandsons Michal Dowden and Davis Gore two hundred acres of land Joyning Land Surveyed by James Sept and likewise the land of John Roden to them and their heirs forever.

Item My will and desire tis that the overplush of my personal or movebles estate above my wifes third be all equilly devied amonst all my children to them and their heirs forever.

Lastly, I do hereby nominate and appoint my beloved wife Elisabeth Gore and my son James Gore Executors of this my last will and testament and I do hereby declare this to be only to be my last will and testament sealed with my seal and signed with my own proper hand this third day of April one
thousand seven hundred and eighty three.

Signed sealed and delivered in presence of us
Test.
George Thomas
Elisha Gore
Michael Gore

Signed and sealed James Gore

George Thomas being duly sworn made oath that he was present and saw James Gore the Testator named in within instrument of writing syn seal execute and proclaim the same as his last will and testament that the same James Gore was the { } of { } mind and memory and in his perfect senses, the he the said George Thomas subscribed as a witness to the Execution of the said Will and that Elisha Gore and Michael Gore were also present at the Execution of the said Will and Subscribed as Witnesses thereto together
with the Deponent and in the presence of the Testator and each other-

Sworn to this 29th
Day of October 1785
J W Harbrit, J.P.


Elizabeth DOWDEN

WILL OF ELIZABETH (Dowden) GORE

I Elizabeth Gore of the state of SC in Chester County being weak of body but in perfect mind and memory and considering that all flesh is mortal and must yield to death do make this my last will and testament.

1st I commit my soul unto the almighty God who gave it and my body to be decantly laid in the ground at the descretion of my executors & my lawful debts to be duly paid and my estate and effcts
I bequeath and dispose of in manner and form following viz first to my well beloved son James Mannin Gore one shilling sterling &
I leave and bequeath to my well beloved son Clement Gore one shilling sterling.
I leave and bequeath to my well beloved son Mical Gore one shilling sterling.
I leave and bequeath to my well beloved son John Ashford Gore one shilling sterling.
I leave and bequeath to my well beloved son Joshua Gore one shilling sterling.
I leave and bequeath to my well beloved son Eleazar Gore all the money he owes me being about twenty seven pounds sterling money.
I leave and bequeath to Sarah Wornall, (no relationship stated), my flax spinning wheel and cotton cards and one small feather bed ant the furniture belonging to it and likewise the third part of the same
to Eleazor Gore and all the rest of my moveable estate consisting of stock and househole furniture excepting my wearing clothes.
I leave and bequeath to my beloved daughter Mary Sanders Eastwood and Elizabeth Noland to be equally divided amoung them and my wearing clothes.
I leave and bequeath to my two grand daughters Millinda Gore, Elizabeth Sanders and Sarah wornell to be equally divided between the three and do herby annominate and appoint my sons John Ashford Gore & Eliazar Gore my whole and sole executors of this my last will and testement and do hereby revoke disallow and disannul all former bequests wills and testement by me heretofore in any wise left or made declaring ratifying and confirming this and no other to by my last will and testement in witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this twenty fifth day of November in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty eight.

Signed Sealed Published and Delivered in the presence of us _____her X Mark.

Elizabeth Gore ATT.

JOSEPH SIMMS PROBATED APRIL 1789
SAMPSON NOLAND RECORDED BOOK A PAGE 19

MICHAEL GORE APT. 21 PKG. 327 JAMES GORE
SERVED

James Gore, (1705-1784), did not list all of his children in his will. Some names were taken from the will of his wife Elizabeth. Thomas Gore , (ca 1728- 1777), who married a Rachel is not listed at all, probably due to his death occurring before his parents.


Mary GORE

Eloped with a half-breed.   *Source:  Internet


Humphrey HARVEY

*Main source for the Harvey Decendancy listed here is:  "The Harvey Book" by Oscar Jewell Harvey 1899 Wilkesbarre, PA

Historical Harvey's of England (from the source mentioned above):

Geoffry III., Viscount of Bourges (Bituricensis), a very ancient city of Berri, a former province of France, rebuilt the Abbey of St. Ambrose, Bourges, A.D. 1012, and in 1037 was at war with the Lord of Chateau-Raoul. One of Geoffry's grandsons, Herveus de Bourges (Anglicized, Hervey of Bourges), accompanied William the Conqueror to England, and , as shown by the Doomsday Book, held in 1086 a great barony in Suffolk. His son Henry Fitz-Hervey (Henry the son of Hervey) witnessed a charter of Roger de Clare (Monasticon Anglicanum, I.: 731).

In the reigns of Richard I and John, of England (1189-1216), Osbert Fitz-Hervey was one of the King's justiciaries.

According to the Great Rolls of the Norman Exchequer William Herveus was in 1198 a landholder in Normandy. In 1199 he had emigrated to Surrey in England. It is said that at this time "probably several families of different origin bore the name, which had been Anglicized into Harvey and Harvie."

Amongst the Anglo-Normans who went over to Ireland from England in 1171 under "Strongbow" (Richard de Clare, Earl of Pembroke), was Herve de Leon, or de Monte Marisco. He was a descendant of Robert Fitz-Harvey, or de Herve', a valiant soldier who came to England with William the Conqueror, as appears by the chronicles of Normandy and England. Without doubt Herve' de Monte Marisco, or Harvey of Montmarsh, was the progenitor of the old and prominent families of Harvey, Harvy and Harvie which have long flourished on the Emerald Isle.

Henry, a son of Harvey of Montmarsh, remained in England and was in the wars with King Richard I. During the succeeding reign of King John he was held in much esteem by that monarch, as appears by the royal grant to him of the forestership of New Forest, Achilles Garth and other lands beyond the river Trent about the year 1203. [See Burke's "History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland, " IV::507.]

From this Henry descended John Hervey of Risley in Bedfordshire, who was elected Knight of the Shire for the county of Bedford in 1386. The moated site of an ancient castle still remains at Thurleigh, in that county, which tradition assigns as the sometime residence of this John Hervey. In 1402 he was enabled by a license from King Henry, IV, to found a collegiate church at Northill. He had two sons, John, his heir, and Peter, from who descended the Northamptonshire Harveys - of which line was Sir Francis Harvey, Judge of the Common Pleas in the reign of James I. From the elder son and heir, John Hervey of Thurleigh, lineally descended the Marquises of Bristol and Baronets of Bathurst, * as well as the Harveys of Cole Park in the county of Wilts.

Of this latter family Robert Harvey was married about 1637 to Sarah ------- of Cole Park. The issue of this marriage was Audley (a cavalier in the reign of Charles I.), John and Hugh. Hugh inherited Cole Park and had issue John (b.1668; d 27 Feb. 1712). The following is from the inscription on the latter's monument in Malmsbury Abbey: "Sub hoc marmore reponuntur excuvia mortales Johannis Harvey de Cole Park.* * * Nati Cantabrigia de familia ejusdem nominis in agro Bedfordienst, non minus antiqua quam honorabili." * *

Prior to the reign of Henry VIII. (which began A.D. 1509) several families bearing the name Harvey, and said to be descended from a common ancestor, were settled in Somersetshire, † England; in which county at that time many manors were held (according to Doomsday Book) under and by virtue of grants made by William the Conqueror to his brother Robert Earl of Morton, and to others of the King's Norman followers. [See "The History and Antiquities of the County of Somerset, " by the Rev. John Collinson, Bath, 1791.]
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Herve was a minstrel of ancient Brittany. His name, which means "battle-worthy", was introduced into England perhaps in legend or in song at the time of the Conquest. The first English census was ordered by William the Conqueror in 1086 and the names of the citizens were recorded in what is known as the Doomsday Book. Both a Herveus and a Herueu de Berruarius appear in the book of that year. The name of William Hervi or Herevi is recorded on the Kalendar of Abbot Samson in 1190 and again on the Curia Regis rolls of Suffolk in 1196. The vowel "a" found in the eastern regions of England is often replaced by an "e" in the west.
*Source:  Harvey Origin Legendary by Charles Guearino and Albert Seddon


Richard HARVEY

"By an inquisition taken at Langport 17 Oct., 1529, it appeared that Richard (b. about 1480), the son and heir of HUMPREY HARVEY , d. 4 Jan., 1526, seized of one-third of the manor of Brockley ( a small parish of Somersetshire, nine miles S.W. of the city of Bristol), 5 messuages, 1 cottage, 1 windmill, 1 dove-house, 5 gardens, 23 acres of arable, 15 of meadow, 88 acres of wood, and ten pence rent in Brockley, together with the advowson of the church --which premises were certified to be holden of the King as of his barony of Wigmore by knight's service. Nicholas Harvey, son and heir of Richard of Brockley, was then (1526) of the age of eleven years. * * *

"In the chancel floor of the church [which is dedicated to St. Nicholas, and is a small structure with a plain embattled tower containing one bell] there is this memorial: 'Here lieth the body of Judith, younger daughter of Nicholas Harvey, Esq., of this parish, who died the 29th Dec., 1652, aged 18 years.' * * * The arms of Harvey of Brockley were, Sable, a fesse or, between tree squirrels sejant argent, cracking nuts or. Crest, a squirrel sejant argent, tail or, cracking a nut of the last." [ See Collinson's "Somerset," II.: 120.]
*Source:  THE HARVEY BOOK, GIVING THE GENEALOGIES OF CERTAIN BRANCHES OF THE AMERICAN FAMILIES OF HARVEY, NESBITT, DIXON AND JAMESON AND NOTES ON MANY OTHER FAMILIES, TOGETHER WITH NUMEROUS BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES, BY OSCAR JEWELL HARVEY, A.M.


William HARVEY

There were Anglo-Norman Harveys in Surrey as early as the beginning of the thirteenth century. In Kent there were Harveys settled at Eythorne early in the fifteenth century, and later at Eastry and Cowden--all sprung from the same stock; and at about the beginning of the sixteenth century, William Harvey, son of Humphrey and brother of Turner, was settled at Folkestone in Kent. It is quite probable that Humphrey Harvey was originally of Kent--but this cannot not be determined.

William Harvey of Folkestone, abovementioned, had a son Thomas, who had a son Thomas, (b. about 1550; d. 12 Jan, 1623), who, in the latter part of the reign of Queen Elizabeth, was described as a "yeoman of Folkestone in Kent." He was married (1st) to ------- Jenkins, and (2nd) to Joane, daughter of Thomas Halke, who bore him seven sons and two daughters. The eldest of these nine children was Dr. William Harvey (b. at Folkestone 1 April, 1578); noted as the discoverer of the circulation of the blood. He was contemporaneous with Thomas Harvey of Ashill, their fathers being second cousins. Doctor Harvey died 3 June, 1657, without issue.
*Source:  THE HARVEY BOOK, GIVING THE GENEALOGIES OF CERTAIN BRANCHES OF THE AMERICAN FAMILIES OF HARVEY, NESBITT, DIXON AND JAMESON AND NOTES ON MANY OTHER FAMILIES, TOGETHER WITH NUMEROUS BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES, BY OSCAR JEWELL HARVEY, A.M.


George W MAYFIELD

He had 3 children and may have died in the Civil War. *Source:  Internet

He likely died bef 29 Sep 1863 because his children were listed as heirs to their Grandfather's estate in the following document:
*Source:  Probate Court Records, Perry County, Alabama, Book K, pp. 115-117, Probate Court, September 29th 1863, See notes for William Radford, SR for full context.


Ozarth MAYFIELD

In 1863, she is listed as an heir to the estate of William Radford, SR, as the "wife of (blank) Myers of the State of Arkansas".
*Source:  Probate Court Records, Perry County, Alabama, Book K, pp. 115-117, Probate Court, September 29th 1863, See notes for William Radford, SR for full context.


William HARVEY

The surname Harvey (also spelled Harvie) is an ancient Norman personal name which has been adopted as a family designation. Harvey is either derived from the Celtic "Houerf" meaning "bitter" the name gradually changing to Houerv, Herve, and later Hervey, Harvie, Harvey or it is derived from the germanic "Herewig" meaning "Land (War) Warrior" coming from Brittany to England with the Normans. Osbert de Hervey is styled in the Register of St Edmundsbury as the son of Hervey. From him according to the Peerage, sprang the Herveys and Harveys, enobled in in England and Ireland and also from the resemblance of the Arms, the Herveys and Harveys of Aberdeenshire and other parts of Scotland. The origin of the Harvey family can be traced back to Geoffry III Viscount of Bourgs (11th Century) in France. His grandson Herveus de Bourges accompanied William the Conqueror to England and in 1086 held a large Barony in Suffolk. His son was Henry Fitz Hervey. Osbert Fitz (de) Hervey was one of the King's Justices in the 12th Century. William Herveus of the same family a landholder in Normandy emigrated to Surrey in England in 1198. Herve de Leon a descendant of Robert Fitz Harvey who came to England with William the Conqueror removed to Ireland in 1171. He is the progenitor of the old and prominent Irish Families bearing the surname Harvey (Harvie). From Henry a son of Harvey of Montmarsh probably a descendant of Herveus descended John Harvey of Risley who was Knight ofd the shire of County Bedford in 1386. He had two sons, John and Peter from whom descended the Northamptonshire Harveys. From John are descended the Marquises of Bristol as well as the Baronets of Bathurst and the Harveys of Cole Park in County Wilts. Several families bearing the surname Harvey and descended from John Hervey of County Bedford settled in Somersetshire. It is related that the above family, Turner Harvey born 1485 son of Humphrey Harvey was the mightiest man in all England with the longbow. Because of his strength and skill with the bow and bravery in battle, Turner became afavorite henchman of Henry VIII. Tradition states that at his death, no man could spring Turner's bow. Turner's son William was the owner of the castle and manor of Bridgewater. William was appointed by Queen Mary, Clarencieux King-Of-Arms, a position of honor. Thomas (1585-1647), a great grandson of Turner and a younger brother of Henry, the owner of Bridgewater Manor, lived in Ashill in Somersetshire. Thomas had issue daugher unknown; James born 1612; William; Thomas. His daughter amd sons William and Thomas emigrated to America. Turner's brother William Harvey settled in Folkstone, Kent. William's grandson Thomas had seven sons and two daughters. One of his sons was Dr. William Harvey famos as the discoverer of the circulation of blood. His father was second cousin to Thomas Harvey of Ashill and Dr. Harvey was therefore related to the emigrants to America, William and Thomas.
*Source:  A Harvey Study, 1957

William was residing in 1630 in Bridgwater. This town (anciently Brugia, Brugie, etc.) is a municipal borough and seaport town of Somersetshire, situated on both banks of the Parret River, twenty-nine miles S. W. of Bristol and eleven miles N.W. of Taunton. William the Conqueror granted the manor to one Walter de Douay, and its name thereupon became Burgh-Walter, of which Bridgwater is a mere corruption. According to Collinson's "Somerset" (III ::75-82) "the place has been very large and populous, but frequently diminished by conflagrations and other causes. Leland, who visited about the year 1538, informs us that in the memory of people then living there had fallen to ruin and fore-decay upwards of 200 houses.
"The arms of the town, as expressed on a town piece dated 1666, consisted of a castle with three towers standing on a bridge over a river. The remains of a castle to which these arms bear allusion stand [1791] on the west side of the quay. Originally the castle was a very large and noble structure, the government whereof was always vested in persons of the highest eminence and distinction." It was build about the year 1202 by William Briwere, who also began the foundations of the bridge over the Parret, and made the haven; both of which were completed in the time of Edward I (1272-1307) by Sir Thomas Trivet.

William Briwere, after many benefactions to the town of Bridgwater, and raising it from a small to a very flourishing place, died in 1227 and was succeeded by William his son.

Many years later the manor and castle of Bridgwater having passed to the crown, King Charles I., by letters patent dated 11 July, 1626, granted the same to Sir William Whitmore, Kent, and George Whitmore, Esq., and their heirs and Assigns. In 1630 the Whitmores sold the manor and castle, and divers messuages, lands and tenements in the parishes of Haygrove, Durleigh, Chilton &c, to Henry Harvey, Esq., son of William Harvey of Bridgwater, hereinbefore mentioned.
*Source:  THE HARVEY BOOK, GIVING THE GENEALOGIES OF CERTAIN BRANCHES OF THE AMERICAN FAMILIES OF HARVEY, NESBITT, DIXON AND JAMESON AND NOTES ON MANY OTHER FAMILIES, TOGETHER WITH NUMEROUS BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES, BY OSCAR JEWELL HARVEY, A.M.


Henry HARVEY

"The arms of the town, as expressed on a town piece dated 1666, consisted of a castle with three towers standing on a bridge over a river. The remains of a castle to which these arms bear allusion stand [1791] on the west side of the quay. Originally the castle was a very large and noble structure, the government whereof was always vested in persons of the highest eminence and distinction." It was build about the year 1202 by William Briwere, who also began the foundations of the bridge over the Parret, and made the haven; both of which were completed in the time of Edward I (1272-1307) by Sir Thomas Trivet.

William Briwere, after many benefactions to the town of Bridgwater, and raising it from a small to a very flourishing place, died in 1227 and was succeeded by William his son.

Many years later the manor and castle of Bridgwater having passed to the crown, King Charles I., by letters patent dated 11 July, 1626, granted the same to Sir William Whitmore, Kent, and George Whitmore, Esq., and their heirs and Assigns. In 1630 the Whitmores sold the manor and castle, and divers messuages, lands and tenements in the parishes of Haygrove, Durleigh, Chilton &c, to Henry Harvey, Esq., son of William Harvey of Bridgwater, hereinbefore mentioned (page 19).

In 1638 Henry Harvey, the proprietor, converted the old gate-house of the castle into a mansion of the form of the letter B, and five years later he leased the castle to King Charles I., who installed Col. Edmund Wyrdham as Governor. Forty guns were mounted on the walls -- which were in most parts fifteen feet thick -- and all the fortifications were regular and strong. The moat was thirty feet wide and of great depth, and every tide filled with water.

At this time the Civil War between the King and the Long Parliament was in progress. Colonel Wyndham Bravely defended the castle for a considerable time against the Parliament army under command of Sir Thomas Fairfax, till at length the eastern part of the town and several houses in the western part being fired by grenades and hot shot from garrison, and much blood being shed among the inhabitants, and their property destroyed, the castle (the greater portion of which had been almost leveled to the ground and demolished by the assaults of besiegers) was surrendered 22 July, 1645 -- thirty-eight days after the battle of Naseby, which utterly annihilated the King's cause.

The town was delivered up on the following day, and about 1,000 officers and soldiers, besides gentlemen and clergy, were made prisoners. In the town the victors captured 44 barrells of gunpowder, 1,500 arms, 44 pieces of ordnance, jewels, plate, and goods of much value which had been sent thither from all the adjacent pars of the country for security -- the Governor having declared that the castle was impregnable against all the force that could be brought against it.

Some time after the surrender of the castle Henry Harvey, its owner, prepared and presented a memorial to Parliament. From a copy of that document, preserved by the memorialist's descendants, the following extract has been made:

"MR. HARVYE'S LOSSES SUSTEYNED BY THE KING'S GOVERNOR.

"20 dwelling-howses and 30 gardens pulled downe and layed wast; Mr. Harvye's inheritance. 1 Fayre pigeon-howse, built all with stone, pulled down and layed wast. 1 barne, and 2 stables, burnt to the ground by him (the Governor) uppon storminge of the towne; land of inheritance. 150 bushels of corn burnt by him. Mr. Harvye's dwelling-howse battered by him [the Governor] uppon the storminge of the towne, that 200 pounds will hardly repayer yt as yt was before. The goods and howse-holde stuff of the castle which he ought to have restored, all lost, being worth 100 marks at the least; the profits of --------- x1. a yeare of his lands taken by vyolence from him by the governor of 2 years. 50' commanders and other soldyers quartered uppon him contrary to a noate under his owne hande. 80 1.rent due for the castle for two yeares. 15 1. lent him owte of purse. 3 thousand hogsheads of the castle lyme solde and ymployed by him. 1 fatt oxe wch he agreede to pay 9 1 for. 5 other fatt oxen apprayzed at 50 1. XXty marks debt lost to Mr. Harvye by setting at liberty one Thomas Hill, being arrested uppon a lawful process. One Thomas Pacon arrested for taking and dryvinge away 18 sheepe of Mr. Harvye's, sett at liberty by the governor and all lost." In 1791 the owner of the manor and ruined castle of Bridgwater was Robert Harvey, M.D., sometime fellow of Sidney College, Cambridge, and a descendant of Henry Harvey aforementioned.
*Source:  Internet


Samuel Thompson CLEMMONS

    He was born in Virginia and raised in North Carolina.  The names of his parents are not known.  He went by his middle name, thus was known as Thompson Clemmons.  When Thompson was twenty years old, his name appeared on the Bute County tax list (in NC).  Also on this list was the name of William Clemmons, who may have been Thompson's' brother.   Probably about the time he was twenty-one, he married Martha Coggin, daughter of John Coggin.  The date and place are unknown.
    In 1774, Thompson was living in  Anson Co, NC.  In those days, the men were expected to work the county roads.  Thompson and William Clemmons were assigned to work on the road from the mouth of the Uwharrie River to Clarke Creek.  In 1779, the residents of Anson county who lived in the northern section felt that the county was too large and needed to be divided.  Among the many men who signed a petition to the governor were the names of Thompson Clemmons, William Clemmons and John Coggin, Thompson's father-in-law.  The county was divided and the northern part became Montgomery County.
    In 1779 Thompson enlisted in Montgomery County and served in the Militia as a "Minute Man" for the Revolutionary War.  He was discharged after 6 months, then drafted again in early 1780 and served an additional 3 months (see notes below for his Revolutionary War pension records).
  In 1783, the state of NC granted to Thompson Clemmons two parcels of land of fifty acres each in Montgomery County.  In 1783, Thompson's name appeared on the tax list of Montgomery County showing that he had one hundred acres of land.
   The birth dates for John and the last four children were taken from an old family Bible believed to have been once owned by Thompson and Martha.  
    Thompson, Martha and the children moved to Wilson Co, TN about 1805.  In July 1808, Thompson bought from Samuel Shannon 70 acres of land, described as being on the north side of Stone's River on a small Sinking Fork of Pond Lick Creek.  This appears to be the first parcel of land that Thompson bought.  
     In May 1821, Thompson sold this land to his son James with certain conditions:  he and his wife, Martha, were to have a life interest in the estate; he reserved to his son William the right to the house and out-houses as long as he desired to live on the property; and James could have possession of the land only at the death of Thompson and wife Martha.
    In September 1831, Thompson bought from James Gary 30 acres of land on Pond Lick Creek.  In November 1832, he sold this land to his son James.  
     In June 1832, an act of congress was passed which authorized pensions for veterans of the Revolutionary War.  Thompson was eligible (see notes below with extracts from Thompson's declaration petition for his benefits).  He was granted a pension of $30 a year, with semi-annual payments of $15.00.  After Thompson's death, a clerk in the pension office at Nashville, TN made a statement admitting that he had mistakenly entered Thompson's name as Thomas and payments had been made to a Thomas Clemmons, who was in fact Thompson Clemmons.  (see notes below with extracts from the clerk's oath).  
     Thompson's name appears on early tax lists for Wilson County, TN for the year 1826, 1827, 1829, 1830, 1832, 1833 and 1834.  
     In Court Minutes Book 1836-1844 at the Wilson County Courthouse during the October Term 1837, it was stated that Thompson Clemmons had departed this life intestate (leaving no will), and his son James applied as Administrator for his estate, which was granted.  In November of 1837, there was a sale of personal property with relatives and friends purchasing items (see details of sale and accounting below).
    Thompson died at the age of 86, outliving three of his sons, Jephthah, William, and Samuel Thompson, Jr.  He is believed to be buried near Gladeville.  It is not known when Martha died or where she is buried.     
*Source:  Extracts from:   Samuel Thompson Clemmons and His Descendants, Thelma Caraway Landrum, 1981, p. 1-3
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Extract from Thompson Clemmons declaration about his Revolutionary War Service made on 29 Sep 1832:

Thompson Clemmons aged 81 years, having been born according to their family register, the 15th of September 1751…….He entered the services of the United States in the year 1779 in the County of Montgomery in the State of North Carolina where he then resided, in the Militia, in the Company commanded by West Harris as Captain, Drury Ledbetter commanded the Militia of said County, and General Rutherford commanded the Brigggade to which he belonged.  Charles Jones acted as Major.  He volunteered as a Minute Man in the Militia.  The Regiment & Brigade to which he belonged were all mounted men and furnished their own horses.  The object of calling out the segment of the Regiment to which he belonged was for purpose of subdueing the Tories who were at that time being troublesome.  They were ordered from point to point wherever they were informed that the Tories were formed in Bodies or were committing depredations on the Whigs.  Declarer was engaged in this service under Captain West Harris for six months during which period they were engaged in a number of Skirmishes with the Tories.  After serving six months he was discharged.  In the early part of the year of 1780, he was drafted in Montgomery County, North Carolina and entered the service under Captain Richard Fair.  They marched and rendezvoused at Sharlotte, North Carolina and marched from thence to Charleston, South Carolina…..His term of service expired, making a service of three months.  Declarer was in service in all nine months.  His discharge has long since lost.  There is no living witness by whom he can prove any part of his service, except Thomas and Samuel Williams by whom he expect to prove a part if not all of his service.  Declarer was born in Virginia, raised in North Carolina in the Counties of Franklin and Montgomery and from the latter county moved to Tennessee, Wilson County about 27 years ago where he still resides.  
*Source:  Samuel Thompson Clemmons and His Descendants, Thelma Caraway Landrum, 1981, p. 15
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
State of Tennessee
Wilson County Court November Term 1837
An account of sale of property of the estate of Thomas (Thompson) Clemmons deceased was produced in Court and ordered to be recorded.   (Recorded 1st Dec 1837)

The amount of Sale of Thompson Clemons decd

Willis Caraway 1 Bedstead & furniture 5.00
Jane Clemons one Table and furniture 1.00
Jane Clemons two chairs                   1.00
E. Holloway two chairs                   .50
Jane Clemons one large jug                .50
Willis Caraway one small jug                .31
Jane Clemons one large oven                .37
Randle Partain saddle bags               1.25
Jane Clemons one saw & drawing knife .31
John Billingsly one lot of wool                .62
Seth Steed one bell                                .37
Randle Partain two yards of janes            1.25
James Clemons three chisels                1.00
James Clemmons 1 pair of bellows                1.62
William Clemons 1 Horse and bridle 25.00
Elijah Grissom one saddle & blanket             3.31
James Clemons one half of a cutting knife   1.00
Jeptha Clemmons  one hogshead                 .93
Etheldred Clemons one halter chain                 .76
Etheldred Clemons one bell                                 .26
Elijah Grissom one sweat pad                 .18

            James Clemons Admr

*Source:  Samuel Thompson Clemmons and His Descendants, Thelma Caraway Landrum, 1981, p. 19
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
State of Tennessee
Wilson County   County Court Term 1839

A Settlement with James Clemmons, Admr. of Thompson Clemmons, deceased Oct. 8, 1837 - The Administrator reports to Nov. Term 1837 of Wilson Co. Court an account of Sales of the Property of said estate which amounts to $46.56 1/4, which is the whole amount the administrator is chargeable with.  
He is entitled to the following credits:
Sales from estate                                                         $46.54
No. 1 Dr. Daniel Richmond acct.                                           $7.50
No. 2 Ezekiel Holloway receipt                                            1.00
        Cash paid for funeral expenses                                   2.50
No. 3 Wesley Hancock receipt                                              1.25
Clerk fee for letters, bonds, etc                  $1.00
Recording Inventory                                       .50
Making this settlement                                   2.00
Recording the same                                         .50
                                                                -----------
                                                                   4.00  4.00

The Admr's. account for keeping a horse
for seven weeks is                                                        7.00
The Admr. allowed for his services                                        10.00          33.25
                                                                         ------------------------------
Balance Due                                                               $13.31

*Source:  Samuel Thompson Clemmons and His Descendants, Thelma Caraway Landrum, 1981, p. 23
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Pioneer Settlers of Wilson County, Tennessee:
ON SINKING CREEK - Thompson Clemmons, William Bacchus, David Fields, Lewis Merritt, Frank Ricketts, Fletcher Sullivan, James Richmond, Robert Jarmon, John Winsett, Jesse Sullivan, William Parsley, and a little later, John Billingaley,
Seldon Baird, Dawson Hancock, Jonathan Ozment, and others;
*Source:  A Historical Sketch of Wilson County, Tennessee From Its First Settlement to the Present Time, by J. V. Drake, Published for the Author by Tavel, Eastman & Howell, 1879, Nashville
Located at:  http://www.tngenweb.org/wilson/sketch.htm
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Extract from document reflecting correction from Thomas Clemmons to Thompson Clemmons for Revolutionary War Service:

State of Tennessee
Davidson County

Be it known this 20th day of Decr. 1837 before me the subscriber an acting Justice of the Peace for the County & State aforesaid personally appeared Stephen Cantrell a clerk in the Pension office at Nashville, State aforesaid, and made oath that he made out the witin pension oath of Identity purporting to be for Thomas Clemmons and in so doing made a mistake (having a considerable number of pensioners to pay on that day & no assistance) and wrote his name on the within instrument as well as the Receipts for the money paid him Thomas Clemmons instead of Thompson Clemmons, that his name is listed on the Rolls of this office Thompson Clemmons, and that the payment he made in the name of Thomas Clemmons say from the 45h Sept. 1836 to the 4th of March 1837 $15 - is charged on the Books of this office to Thompson Clemmons……..This explanation is offered because the said Thompson Clemmons is now dead and it is thus rendered impossible to procure new vouchers for this payment.

*Source:  Samuel Thompson Clemmons and His Descendants, Thelma Caraway Landrum, 1981, p. 21
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Extract from the INTRODUCTION to Thelma Caraway Landrums book:

The name CLEMMONS comes from the Latin word CLEMENS, meaning "mild, placid, kind and merciful".  There are various spellings of the name such as:  Clements, Clement, Clemans, Clemons, and others.  In early records of Virginia and North Carolina, the name Clements is seen more often than any other spelling……In describing the Clemmons men of Wilson Co, (TN), Mr. Gene Sloan once wrote:  "Most of them were hard working farmers.  They were not very 'talkative'.  Their farm chores kept them pretty busy, and they were lightened only by such gatherings as protracted gatherings, neighborhood meetings to 'raise a barn', help in haying or clearing new ground."
*Source:  Internet


Martha COGGIN

Martha died in Lebanon, TN and was buried in Lebanon, TN.  
*Source:  The Descendants of Coggin (Cogan) John, 1590-1658, Compiled by Roy J. Coggin, 1996/99


William CLEMMONS

Notes:  I own a copy of the Thelma Caraway Landrum book and have basically entered notes into this database information that relates to our direct line of ancestors.  I am, however, including many notes on William, since his records serve as further validation of the descendants of our Samuel Thompson Clemmons.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
William apparently never married as no record has ever been found of a wife and children, and when he died, he left a considerable estate that was divided amongst his siblings, nieces and nephews.  In Thelma Landrum's book, she makes several speculations about William, which are unverifiable, but interesting.  First, when his father Thompson sold land to his son James, the sale had several conditions - one being that William was to have use of the dwelling house and all the out-houses for as long as he chose to live on the premises.  Per Ms. Landrum "Since Thompson made sure that William had a place to live, it is possible William  might have been disabled in some way."  Secondly, she infers that William was gravely ill when he made his will in April of 1827, as he stated he was weak in body.  Thirdly, she suggests that William  was kind and compassionate as the first item in his will was to set his Negro man free.  Fourth, she suggests that William may have owned a mercantile store, evidenced by the enormous amount of merchandise at a sale of his personal property, which was held in July of 1827.  William also owned 168  acres of land when he died.  All the land, along with the proceeds from the sale of his personal property was willed to his siblings and to the nieces and nephews of his siblings that had predeceased him.  However, the most important aspect of William's will is that it firmly establishes the family of Samuel Thompson Clemmons.  
*Source:  Extracts from:   Samuel Thompson Clemmons and His Descendants, Thelma Caraway Landrum, 1981, p. 68
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Extracts from the Will of William Clemmons, Division of Land - Deed Book M, p. 511 & 512

....to divide the lands of William Clemmons, dec'd., between John Clemmons, Etheldred Clemmons, Joseph Moxley, Obediah Merritt, Edward Edwards, James Clemmons, Willis Caraway, Peggy, Melinda, Lavina, Caroline & Jeptha Clemmons, minor heirs of Jeptha Clemmons, dec'd., Lelan Thompson, & Presley Clemmons, minor heirs of Samuel T. Clemmons, and Etheldred Bennett, heirs at law of the said William Clemmons, decd.  

This is how these heirs fit with William Clemmons:

John - brother
Etheldred - brother
Joseph Moxley - husband of his sister Lavina
Obediah Merritt - husband of his sister Priscilla
Edward Edwards - husband of his sister Nancy
James - brother
Willis Caraway - husband of his sister Susannah
Peggy, Melinda, Lavina, Caroline & Jeptha Clemmons - children of his deceased brother Jephthah **
Lelan Thompson, Presely - children of his deceased brother Samuel T. Clemmons, Jr
Etheldred Bennett - husband of his sister Mary (Polly)

**Note, on page 25 of Ms. Landrums book, Jephthah Clemmon's children are listed as:
1.  Margaret (Peggy)
2.  Lavina
3.  Malinda
4.  Jephthah Jr
5.  Mary (Polly) Caroline


Mary CLEMMONS

She married Etheldred Bennett.   
*Source:  Samuel Thompson Clemmons and His Descendants, Thelma Caraway Landrum, 1981, p. 2


Etheldred CLEMMONS

He married Milly Edwards.  
*Source:  Samuel Thompson Clemmons and His Descendants, Thelma Caraway Landrum, 1981, p. 2


Lavina CLEMMONS

She married Joseph Moxley on 16 Apr 1816 and second she married William Shanks on 21 Mar 1844.  
*Source:  Samuel Thompson Clemmons and His Descendants, Thelma Caraway Landrum, 1981, p. 2


Samuel CLEMMONS Jr

He married Sarah (Sallie) Teague on 8 Dec 1813 in Wlson Co, TN.  
*Source:  Samuel Thompson Clemmons and His Descendants, Thelma Caraway Landrum, 1981, p. 2


James CLEMMONS

He married first Elizabeth Lee on 6 Mar 1821 and second he married Demaris Parton on 10 May 1825, both in Wilson Co, TN.  
*Source:  Samuel Thompson Clemmons and His Descendants, Thelma Caraway Landrum, 1981, p. 2


Nancy CLEMMONS

She married Edward Edwards on 19 Dec 1814 in Wilson Co, TN.
*Source:  Samuel Thompson Clemmons and His Descendants, Thelma Caraway Landrum, 1981, p. 2


Susannah CLEMMONS

She married Willis Caraway on 7 Oct 1818 in Wilson Co, TN.  
*Source:  Samuel Thompson Clemmons and His Descendants, Thelma Caraway Landrum, 1981, p. 2