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The DIY Ribbon Velocity Microphone, a home project

Welcome graphic


This site was built in mid-2003, as a class project for a college course.  Please keep in mind that the information on the site may be oriented for education, but that information is for everyone to use for thier own designs.
 
Over the past 11 years, I have built a ton of mics  Lots of ribbons and condensers. A far cry from the dorm room that I built my first and second ones in.  It is amazing how so much has changed in such a short time.  When I started, there was no information on the internet about building ribbon microphones, and I had to spend time at the library (GASP!), getting to know Mr. Howard Tremaine.  Now, this information is everywhere. 
 

By the way, there are people on the internet selling plans to make your own ribbon microphones for $9.99.  I will tell you that these people bugged the hell out of me for the information that they used to create the PDF that they sell, and really didn't know what they were doing.  It just goes to show that anyone can make a great microphone, and it is really hard to mess up.  So you don't have to buy someone else's DIY ribbon microphone plans. Everything you need is either here or on Prodigy-Pro. If you need help, I'll do what I can. And the best part of it is that it is FREE.

Overall, though, this site became more than a project.  This site is now a site dedicated to the individual building a quality DIY ribbon mic from parts that you can do yourself.  After many thousands of emails over the years (and more hits than you would believe), I can say that I feel the "Original DIY Ribbon Mic Site"  has done more than what I ever dreamed it could have.
 
 

  Now, on with the original website...

Welcome to my website. I hope you find some useful information about the construction of (and some of the physics behind) a ribbon microphone. If not from this site, then from the very few links I have found. I will attempt to document the process I went through to construct what I have as much as I can, but time to do so is scarce right now, so please excuse me if this lacks some info.


Please let me know via email if I can provide more precise information, or if you have any questions that I have not addressed in the site itself.

 
I decided to make a ribbon mic as a project for a College class I was attending.   The interest in my project has been a little overwhelming, and it came out so well, that I decided to put this up for others to use. 
Just so you know right off the bat, building this microphone was fairly easy, and the results are fantastic,  so it is a worthwhile endeavour for the "do it yourselfer."
 
 
 
 
By the way, Sorry about the really bad photos.  My dig camera really sucks, but I can't afford another one now.

SPIKE THE MIC
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(almost) finished product

Looks funky, eh?  Did I mention that this mic cost me just shy of $20.00 to make?  Of course, I purchased mostly readily available materials. Also, I had some materials and some MAJOR contributions, but I'll save them for later...

Please get in touch and let me know what you think of this site. Also feel free to contribute to this site with your own tips.
All information, text, photos, and all other content (except cited references, links, and photographic material, etc. owned by others) is copyrighted material (copyright 2003), and may not be used for any commercial purpose without expressed and written permission from me.  Truly educational, non-profit uses are great, although I would like to be informed of use beforehand. This site is intended to inform the common person and help those who wish to build something themselves, and if you use it for any other reason that you know you shouldn't, you are a jackass, and may be liable for infringment.
 

  

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