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If you can add to, identify or link any of the following, write Joan Case at bjcase@awoc.com

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From a person -Name withheld

John Perryman born in Virginia (father)
John Milton Perryman born in Georgia md Ivy (son)
Washington Lafayette Perryman abt 1828 in Tennessee md Willie (grandson)
    The children of Washington Lafayette ended up in Indian Territory and are on the Creek Indian Roll. On the roll it says that Washington was Creek and his wife Willie was a non-citizen. Caldonia the daughter of Washington had to go to court in get one of her children on the roll that was left off originally. She got a lawyer in Tulsa to help her and in a sworn statement said "because that's where my father's people, the Perryman's were" (Benjamin Perryman's grandsons were in Tulsa, Legust Perryman being Chief of the Creeks). Elizabeth also said while growing up her mother took her to the Indian Museum in Okmulgee, and told her that her grandmother was related to Joseph Moses Perryman and Legus Perryman but didn't know how.

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Indian and Pioneer History Vol 104 pg 81
(Interview with Mrs. Willie Blair (a granddaughter of Washington above) daughter of Caledonia)
    .....Thomas Perryman was my uncle and the Superintendent of the Eufaula School. Legus C. Perryman was my uncle and Chief of the Creeks at one time.....
    Was the John Perryman above the son of David? (Right time period).

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Who was Who Among the Southern Indians, a genealogical notebook, 1698-1907
by Don Martini, Falkner, MS.
    Perryman Thomas - Creek trader, was at Buffalo Creek in the Creek country in 1752, and was trading at Tuckabatche nine years later. He may have been the father of chief James Perryman, Mikasuki Chief in the 1790's.
    Perryman, Sandy - Creek, moved west in 1829. He was possibly the Sans Perryman who married Betsy Porter and was the father of Cornelius (born 1852).....
    Perryman, Samuel - Creek, is said to have been a son of Benjamin Perryman. He served in the Creek War of 1813-1814 and moved west in 1829, where he was chief in 1833 .......
    Perryman, Prince - Creek, moved west in 1829, He was a resident of Cheyahar who married Sallie and was the father of William.....
    Perryman, Lewis - Creek, is said to have been born in 1787, the son of Benjamin Perryman . He moved west in 1829......
    Perryman, Lewis - Creek, was a resident of Lower Eufaula in 1832, though he was omitted from the census. He received a reserve on the Chattahootchee River, east of Clayton, Alabama...
    Perryman, John - Creek, lived at Lower Eufaula in 1832, his household consisting of one male and one female. He received a reserve for S15 T9 R24, located on the Chattahootcee River east of Clayton, Alabama.
    Perryman, John - Creek, moved west in 1829.
   Perryman, James - Creek chief, was probably the son of trader Thomas Perryman. He was a chief of the Mikasoukies in the 1790s and was said to be the father-in-law of adventurer William Augustus Bowles.
    Perryman, James - Creek , was resident of Lower Eufaula in 1832, his family consisting of one male and one female. He received a reserve for S7 T11 R28, located on the Chattahootchie River east of Clayton, Alabama. He was possibly the James who was a Baptist preacher in 1835 and possibly the James who served in the CAS during the civil War.
    Perryman, Isaac - Creek, moved west in 1829.
    Perryman, Henry - Creek, was possibly a son of Benjamin Perryman. He moved west in 1829...
    Perryman, Elsey - Creek, received a reserve in 1834 for S9 T9 R29.....
    Perryman, Daniel - Creek, served in McIntosh's Regiment during the Seminole War. As did Samuel Perryman. George and Thomas Perryman served in the Florida War.
    Perryman, Christy - Creek, also called Christopher Columbus Perryman, was said to be a son of Benjamin Perryman. He moved west in 1829........
    Perryman, Chloe - Creek, moved west in 1829.
    Bowles, William Augustus - a white resident of the Creek country and adventurer, was born in Frederick County, Maryland, October 22, 1763, supposedly the son of Thomas and Eleanor Bowles, natives of England. He served in a Loyalist regiment during the Revolution, and in 1788 appeared mysteriously on the coast of Florida with presents for the Lower Creeks. Alexander McGillivray, chief of the Upper Creeks in title but chief of all the Creeks in fact, lightly regarded the newcomer, thinking him only as representative of some benevolent society come to help the red man. What McGillivray did not know was that Bowles was among the Creeks with two aims in mind, to replace McGillivray with himself and to supplant McGillivray's ally, Panton, Leslie & Company, with the trading house of Miller, Bonhamy & Company of the Bahamas. Eventually, McGillivray and William Panton learned of Bowles' true mettle, and worked feverishly to stop him. In February, 1792, they lured him to New Orleans, and there he was arrested. He was taken from there to Havana, then to a prison in Spain. From there he was sent to the Philippines, but somehow escaped and made his way to England in 1797. Shockingly, he reappeared on the coast of Florida in September, 1799, moving among the Mikasukis there. For four years he lived among the Mikasuki, even taking one of the Perryman's for a wife. His enemies, McGillivray and Panton, were dead by 1801. In May, 1803 he made a mistake traveling to the Upper Creek country. He was arrested there by Samuel Moniac and Charles Weatherford, brothers-in-law of the late McGillivray, and was returned to the Spanish. He was imprisioned at Havana's Morro Castle, and died in that city on December 23, 1805.

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February 1972 Historical Society News lette
Dear Chief McIntosh:
    In my local Indian research I have located the approximate area where once stood the Indian village named Perryman. This is located near the Chattahoochee River about eight miles south of Abbyville. Graves of the last Perrymans of this area are nearby at old Smithville. Mr. Perryman Mobley is a descendant of this group of Perrymans from Perryman Alabama in Henry County. Please pass this on to the Perryman family just in case they might be interested.
W. W. Jordan
Abbeyville, Alabama

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Dick Warner, 3168 South Rockford Drive, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74105 (918) 742-5474
Letter 21 Nov 1996
    ....As for the ancestry of Benjamin Perryman, I have not located any definite information, but I do have some clues....The three white Perryman brothers who came from England landed in York County, Virginia, in 1666. I have obtained genealogical charts on that family, but it doesn't trace to a Creek Perryman, but I think it probably would, if it were carried down another generation....There are two white Perrymans in Georgia who I believe might be ancestors of Benjamin Perryman. They were David Perryman who died in Columbia County, Georgia, in 1803 <I believe he died in SC. His tombstone is at Old Fort 96, SC (jc)> and Theophilus (or Theodore) Perryman who was a white trader to the Creeks in the 1700s. [I have seen a reference to Theodore Perryman, but I believe the author saw a Theo. Perryman and thought it meant Theodore, but was probably Theophilus Perryman.} I think this Theophilus (or Theodore) Perryman was a son of David Perryman. Theophilus Perryman did have a son named James Perryman who was called a half-breed and who is said to have been the progenitor of the Creeks of that name.

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 Vernon Perryman, 6883 Shiloh Road, Goshen, Oh 45122-9573
Letter 14 Feb 1996
    As you know, I am reseaching the Indian Chief, Benjamin Perryman. I have most of the reasearch completed on the Oklahoma end. I need all the help I can get on the Alabama, South Carolina, and Georgia group. I am trying to find out who the fir Perryman's were in those states. I know the father of benjamin was a white man that married into the Creek tribe. Benjamin Perryman was a tribal chief of some prominence among the Creeks in Alabama, and was a pronounced adherent of the McIntosh Faction. Benjamin moved to Fort Gibson, in Indian Territory, February 1828, with the Chilli McIntosh Party. Following is some data I hope will help.
    Fort Scott - This fort was established in 1816 by General Jackson's army and abandoned in September, 1821. A George Perryman was the care-taker ther for a while.
    Old Fowl Town - This was a small lower creek town on the East side of the Chattahoochee River. It appeared on some maps as Periman's, or Perryman's. This name came from either George Perryman, the care-taker of Fort Scott, or Theophilus Perryman, a white trader, who lived there at one time. It is not to be confused with sevearal other Fowl Towns in Georgia.
    There was a Fowl Town eight (8) miles South of what is now Bainbridge, Georgia, in Decatur County on the bank of the Flint River. The people spoke Hitchiti.
    Wekiva - This lower Creek town of about 250 people with 25 or 30 warriors, was on the West bank of the Chattahoochee Rive rabout ten (10) miles above the fork of the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers in Jackson County, Florida.
    Captain Young wrote that the Chief was Ben Perryman and was regarded as honest and firnedly towards the white people about 1818.
    In 1762, Theophilus Perryman, and James McQueen, (sic) traders, complained to the Georgia Council that Lewis Sermon, apparently another trader, had settled in one of their towns and was trading without a license. He had also caused the Indians to seize some of Perryman's goods. An 18th Century Indian trader, named Theophilus Perryman, is mentioned as living in Old Fowl Town. (See Abstracts of Georgia Colonial Conveyances Book C-l 1750-1761 April 22, 1758, Theo. Perryman)
    Thomas S. Woodward mentions a white trader named Theophilus Perryman, in Octiyokny with his half-breed son, James, who was the father of many children named, Priam (Perryman). A. T. Perryman is mention in the colonial Records of Georgia, as a trader with James McQueen, at Tuckabatchee, Pea Creek, Chactaw Hatcheechee, etc., in 1761.
    I believe Cashin found a refenence to a Theo. Perryman, and assumed that it meant the common Theodore, and not the uncommon, Theophilus. He does provide a clue as to this man. He wrote that Theodore Perryman was from Augusta, Georgia, and that city is in Columbia County, where David Perryman lived and died.
    It is possible that there are some records in that County or City that will shed light on Theodore or Theophilus Perryman. We are left with the question of whether James Perryman, the half-breed son of Theophilus Perryman, and Chief Perryman, the half-breed son of Theodore Perryman were brothers.....
    (JC) He goes on to tell of David's ancestry of which he is one.

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Africans and Creeks From the Colonial Period to the Civil War by David F. Luttifield Jr.
Pg 34
    ..Thus, the year following the treaty was marked by border clashes, trespasses, intrigue. William Augustus Bowles, claiming to represent England, reappeared in 1791, son-in-law of Perryman, chief of Osuche (Oswichee) on the Flint. Bowles proclaimed himself general and director of the affairs of the Creek nation and tried to arouse both the United States and Spain and renouncing the Traty of New York, for a time threatened to wrest leadership of the Creeks from McGillivray.
Pg 70
    On the Apalachicola, Woodbine found support in Thomas Perryman, whose village was on the chattahoochee. Woodbine and Perryman worked to persuade Kinhijah (Kinhache), also known as Capichee Micco, of the Mikasuki on longer to restrain his young men and to make was on the Americans. Woodbine allegedly offered him $100 for every trader, cowkeeper, or other American and for every black they captured. Woodbine obtained an agreement, marked by Perryman for the Seminoles and Capichee Micco for the Mikasuki, in which they agreed to turn over all prisoners to him. Agent Benjamin Hawkins, who charged that the headquarters of Athe encouragers of Mischief was at Perryman's, reported in November 1814 that the blacks had arrived there from Pensacola and a hundred more were expected to join Woodbine. Hawkins believed that Perryman's town was inside the limites of the United States and urged that something to be done about him. (Mahon p. 289 Hawkins to Jackson 11-11-1814 War of 1813-1814 - Hawkins & Lower Chiefs - Military Division, Alabama Dept. of Archives and History - Montgomery).
    Later that same month, Hawkins reported that although Capichee Micco was not unfriendly, he could not govern his young men who were ready to join the war parties of either the British or the Indians in predatory warfare and who gave Aencouragement to the Negoes to run to them.The Hitchiti towns called Fowl Town and Oketeyoconne, both breakaways from the Lower Creek towns, wer hostile. The inhabitants of Fowl Town urged the Red Sticks to wage war against the Americans, and Hawkins charged, the British offered them bounties for scalps, provided them clothes and numitions, and encouraged them to plunder horses and blacks from the Americans and friendly Indians. Using Perryman's as headquarters, raiding parties had been sent out thre times. The first had plundered slaves from the mixed bloods; the second had plundered the plantations of two Georgians and that of Timothy Barnard in the Creek Nation and also took five slaves from Hawkins himself. The firs party had been captured near the Creek Agency but had escaped.
Pg 99
    Besides these twelve blacks, nine were delivered to Concharta Micco, one each to white men Anthony McCulloch and William Hambly, one to Daniel Perryman, two to John Stedham, and seven to William Kinnard, all Indians.......
Pg 115
    ....At Cheehaw was Sandy Perryman, who listed three males and two females.
Pg 237
    ....Later, when the Union Army began activities in the Indian Territory, some Southern Creeks such as Mose Perryman and Benjamin Marshall took their slaves to the Red River in the choctaw and Chickasaw nations to prevent them from escaping to the North, and others, including several of the McIntosh family, went to east Texas with their blacks...

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McGillivray of the Creeks by John Walton Caughey
Pg 6
    .. Yet a conspicuous feature of the documents which follow is the number of whites and part-whites resident among the Creeks: Burgess, "the Bully," the Cornells, Durand, the Galphins, Grizzard, Kinnard, McQueen, Milfort, Perryman, Sullivan, Walker, Weatherford: these names suggest the importance of this element. Nor is there anything to suggest that the Creeks discriminate against half-breeds. Reckoning descent in the female line, these Indians had a measure of indifference toward fathers that is a trifle difficult for a paternal people to understand.
pg 48
    Upon receipt of the news of Bowles' return, McGillivray went to the Lower Towns where he reported that Bowles, "aided and protected by Philatouchy & Perryman and their friends," was "making a great noise in the Chetaws, & has perfectly confused & distracted the foolish & inconsiderate part of the Indians thereabout." McGillivray wanted to seize Bowles, but refrained because of the shelter afforded the latter by his friends and his father-in-law Perryman. Indian custom forbade the use of violence in a friend's house or town
pg 166
    Perryman tells me that he got a letter from Your Excellency for me & which he has sent up to my house.
pg 211
    Bowles also landed some cannon, the caliber of which is not indicated; he made some presents to the Indians, and one of the latter names Periman, whose daughter is or has been the concubine of Colonel Brown in Providence, shows himself to be very active for the introduction of goods and in favor of the Englishman Bowles, and openly declares himself enemy of the Spaniards.
pg 222
    He proposed then to go to the mouth of Flint River to meet the ship, there to unload and bring up the goods by the river to the place called bullys, or to the house of Burgess or Perymand.....Consequently, they went in a boat from Perrymand's new house to the mouth of the river, where they arrived on December 21, and waited there into January without the ship's appearing. Then Bowles lost patience and determined to return with Perrymand to his house....
pg 298-300
    We are here not without our troubles, for that fellow Bowles, aided & protected by Philatouchy & Perryman and their friends, is making a great noise in the Chetaws, & has perfectly confused & distracted the foolish & inconsiderate part of the Indians thereabout....When I went to the Lower Towns, I endeavored to draw him from the Factor Philatouchies house, but without success, for his father-in-law Perryman suspected me & would not let him come & finding the Indian unwilling to use violence in a friends town, as they call one another, and as I did not choose to indulge the factor, by going to see a stranger whose business was to wait on me I returned without seeing him....doubt must be encouraged to the attempt by those who sent him first, & you may depend that the said Philatouchy & Perryman will be aiding to all his designs however base & Injurious they may prove to their country in the end....
    I sent three Warriors to dispatch the vagabond, but they are just returned without effecting it, he is so well guarded by the Factor & Perryman, but in a little time I have no doubt of his being killed, for the new things be brought will soon be gone & then the dreams which his lies has occasioned will come to an end.
    ....Then, Bowles, if he is alive will push off to Providence; the Factor & Perryman will fly to their former lurking places in time of danger, & as for me I am firmly resolved to move myself, family & negroes down this River to Little River.......
pg 306
    List of people said to be under sentence of proscription by Bowles: William Panton, John Leslie & Robt., Edward Forrester, Tom Perryman, Tom Carr, James Loveitt, James Burges with other I forgett.

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McIntosh and Weatherford, Creek Indian Leaders, by Benj. W. Griffith, Jr.
Pg 178
George Perryman, A Seminole chief, reported from Fowltown, a stttlement 15 miles east of Ft. Scott on the Florida line.

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From: DSavannah@aol.com
Date: Tue, 18 Aug 1998 14:18:32 EDT
To: bjcase@awoc.com
Subject: Re: Perryman
Joan,
    I know that William and George Perryman were sons of Thomas Perryman, who lived at the "old Fowltown" you mentioned which was on the Georgia side of the Chattahoochee River in what is now Seminole County (about 15 miles north of the confluence of the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers). William Perryman, in a letter sent to the Spanish commandant at St. Marks, identifies himself as a "brother-in-law" of William Augustus Bowles. This, by default, would mean that Bowles was the son-in-law of Thomas Perryman and, accordingly, that Thomas Perryman was the individual mentioned by both McGillivray and Bowles in their letters.
    Thomas Perryman and William Perryman both co-signed letters to the British Governor at New Providence during the War of 1812 seeking British assistance against the Americans. These letters were primarily responsible for the decision by the British to land troops on the Apalachicola River in 1814.
    Thomas Perryman is known to have been alive as late as February of 1815, but appears to have died shortly thereafter as by 1816 he is referred to in military documents as being the "late" chief of the Seminoles. George Perryman, a brother of William, was hired by Lieutenant Colonel Duncan Clinch of the 4th U.S. Infantry in December of 1816 to serve as caretaker for the buildings and supplies left at Camp Crawford (Fort Scott) on the Flint River when the troops there were ordered withdrawn by the Secretary of War. Shortly after the troops departed, "Red Stick" Creeks came to the fort in "large numbers" and ordered Perryman to leave, threatening to burn the place over his head. He and his family fled in a canoe to the village of his "brother" (i.e. William), who is reported by Captain Hugh Young to have lived at Telmochesses, a village on the west bank of the Chattahoochee River in what is now Jackson County, Florida. William Perryman then carried a letter from George Perryman to Lieutenant Richard Sands at Fort Gaines, Georgia, describing the burning of Camp Crawford (Fort Scott) and the hostile attitude of the Indians in the area.
    In December of 1817, following the U.S. attacks on the Hitchiti Creek village of Tutalossee Talofa ("Fowl" or "Chicken Town") in Decatur County, Georgia, the "Red Sticks" responded by raiding the plantations of William Hambly and Edmund Doyle on the east bank of the Apalachicola River near Bristol, Florida.
    Learning of this attack, William Perryman raised a party of warriors and went down to try to rescue Hambly and Doyle but was reported killed and his warriors forced to join the hostile faction.
    The confusion over whether George Perryman was a Seminole or Creek actually originates from the fact that the family lived so far down the Chattahoochee River among villages that were known as the "Apalachicola Seminole." In reality, these were Creeks who lived somewhat separated from the primary Lower Creek towns. The Perrymans in 1822 moved back up the river to the Creek nation.
Dale

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WHERE DID BENJAMIN PERRYMAN COME FROM?
By Dick Warner
26 August 1995 - 1st Revision
    Benjamin Perryman arrived at Fort Gibson, Indian Territory, in February 1828 with the Chilli McIntosh party. The party consisted of adherents of the McIntosh faction of the Creek Nation and were, for the most part, wealthy mixed bloods from the Lower Creek towns along the Chattahoochee River that divides Alabama and Georgia. According to the article in The Chronicles of Oklahoma by John Bartlett Meserve, Benjamin was accompanied by six sons and two daughters: Samuel, Columbus, Moses, James, Lewis, Henry, Lydia, and Mary.1 Their trip must not have been too difficult as they came by boat.2
   Meserve wrote that Benjamin Perryman was a tribal chief of some prominence among the Creeks back in Alabama and was a pronouced adherent of the McIntosh faction. His Creek name was Steek-cha-ko-me-co. He signed a treaty at Fort Gibson on 24 February 1833, and had his portrait painted in 1836 at Fort Gibson by George Catlin. That is about all we really know about him.
    From some sources that I can't locate now, it is thought that he was born in 1755. Meserave did write that his son, Lewis, was born at Fort Mitchell, Alabama, in 1778, so Benjamin Perryman must have lived there at some time.
    Before we go on any further, some of the locations that will be mentioned should be discussed and their sites located. The list of Creek towns comes from a list prepared by Capt. Hugh Young, the topographer for General Andrew Jackson in 1818.3 There are many variations in the spelling of the Creek towns and all of them are not shown below. To be completely accurate, some of the locations mentioned below as towns were not official Creek towns, but villages affiliated with a town. A Creek town was a special political entity with a square and such.

Fort Gaines - This fort was established in 1816 as an outpost to protect the settlers of the region of southwest Georgia and southeast Alabama from the Indians. 4 A Fort Gaines appears on current maps on the east side of the Chattahoochee River in Clay County, Georgia, about 65 miles north of the fork of the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers.

Fort Mitchell - A Fort Mitchell appears on current maps on the west bank of the Chattahoochee River in Russell County, Alabama, about 10 miles south of Columbus, Georgia and about 55 miles north of Fort Gaines. It is in the vicinity of where there were a number of Lower Creek towns including: Uchee, Kusseta, and Hitchiti.

Fort Scott - This fort was established in 1816 by General Jackson's army and abandoned in September 1821. A George Perryman [#2] was the care-taker for a while. It was about 12 miles east of the Chattahoochee River on the bank of the Flint River in Decatur County, Georgia, a short distance southwest of the current Bainbridge, Georgia. 5

Kashihta (Cus-se-tuh, Dussetta) - This was an old Lower Creek town a few miles east of Columbus, Georgia, in either Muskogee or Chattahoochee Counties. It would appear to have been in what is now the Fort Benning Military Reservation. The people spoke Hitchiti.

Micashuke (Mikashuki, Miccosukee) - This was a Seminole town of about 1,400 people about 10 miles northeast of Tallahassee, Florida, on the bank of Lake Miccosukee in Leon County, Florida. The people spoke a language that was understood by those speaking Hitchiti and was probably a dialect of it.

Octiyokny (Okitiyakani) - This was a Lower Creek town near Fort Gaines, Georgia, on the east side of the Chattahoochee River in Clay County, Georgia. It was about 55 miles up the chattahoochee River from Old Fowl Town. The people spoke Hitchiti.

Old Fowl Town (Perimans, Perrymans) - This was a small Lower Creek town on the east side of the Chattahoochee River about 12 miles west of Fort Scott in Seminole County, Georgia. It appeared on some maps as Perimans or Perrymans. This name came from either George Perryman [#2], the care-taker at Fort Scott, or Theophilus Perryman, a white trader, who lived here at one time. It is not to be confused with several other Fowl Towns in Georgia. There was a Fowl Town 8 miles south of what is now Bainbridge, Georgia, in Decatur County on the bank of the Flint River.6 The people spoke Hitchiti.

Red Grounds (O-cun-cha-ta) - This was a Upper Creek (Alabama town of about 100 people on the west bank of the Chattahoochee River about 2 miles above the fork of the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers in Jackson County, Florida. It was about 4 miles south of the Lower Creek town of Wekiva. Conchallamicao (Conchattimico) was the chief and he and his warrior were considered hostile to whites.

Telmochesses (Temochresses) - This Lower Creek town was on the west bank of the chattahoochee River in Jackson County, Florida, about 15 miles north of the fork of the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers. In 1818 the chief was William Perryman [#1] and his 10 to 15 warriors were considered well disposed to whites. 7 These people spoke Hitchiti.

Thack-to-eth-la (Tock-to-eth-la) - This Lower Creek town of 40 to 50 warriors was on the east side of the Chattahoochee River about 10 miles above the fork of the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers in Seminole County, Georgia. The warriors had moved there from Red Grounds.

Wekiva - This Lower Creek town of about 250 people with 25 to 30 warriors was on the west bank of the Chattahoochee River about 10 miles above the fork of the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers in Jackson County, Florida. Capt. Young wrote that the chief was Ben Perryman and he was regarded as honest and friendly towards whites. 8

    Only a few references to a Benjamin or Ben Perryman have yet been discovered in the early records. In about 1790 William Augustus Bowles ordered his secretary to Amake Ben (Perryman) return his table. 9 Capt. Hugh Young reported that Ben Perryman was chief at Wekiva and was regarded as honest and friendly. This was in about 1818.
    A questionable reference to a Creek Chief named Benjamin Perryman was found in a compilation of white Perryman genealogy. The statement found was the "a David Perryman or one of his descendants married an Indian Princess of the Creek Indian Tribe - many descended from an Indian Chief, Benjamin Perryman".11 His statement was probably based on a letter from Audrae Visser of Elkton, South Dakota, containing the same information and included in the book.12
   There is little doubt that the Perryman family originally came from the British Isles. The David Perryman mentioned above was a descendant of a Robert Perryman who sailed from Bristol, England, in 1666 and landed at Skimino, Youk County, Virginia. The line from him to David Perryman is not clear, but David was either a grandson or great grandson of this Robert Perryman. David Perryman was a private in the Lunenburg County Colonial Militia in 1758 and eventually settled in Columbia County, Georgia, where he died about 1803.13
   The Creek Perrymans obviously derive from a child of a white Perryman a Creek woman. There were possibly two white traders name Perryman who operated in the Creek area in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. It is possible that they were the same man as I will explain later.
    Thomas S. Woodward mentions a white trade named Theopilus Perryman in Octiyokny with his half-breed son, James, who "was the father of as many children as Priam".14 A. T. Perryman is mentioned in the Colonial Records of Georgia as a trader with James McQueen at Tuckabatchee, Pea Creek, Chactaw Hatchee, Euchee, etc., in 1761.15 These were Upper Creek towns in Alabama and not on the Chattahoochee River. The next year Theophilus Perryman and James McQuean (sic), traders, complained to the Georgia Council that Lewis sermon, appently another trader, had settled in one of their town and was trading without a license. He had also caused the Indians to seize some of "Periman's" goods.16 And 18th century Indian trader named Theophilus Perryman is mentioned as living in Old Fowl town.17
   Just to make things confusing, there was a white trader of Augusta, Columbia County, Georgia, named Theodore Perryman who had a half-breed son called "Chief Perryman". From several sources, it would appear that "Chief Perryman" was William Perryman [#1], chief at Kasihtas and a friend of William Augustus Bowles. A daughter of "Chief Perryman" was the concubine of Thomas Brown in Georgia and Florida.18 It seems unlikely that there would have been both a Theodore and a Theophilus Perryman in the same area at the same time. I believe Cashin found a reference to a "Theo" Perryman and assumed that it meant the common Theodore and not the uncommon Theophilus. He does provide a clue as to this man. He wrote that Theodore Perryman was from Augusta, Georgia, and that city is in Columbia County where David Perryman lived and died. It is possible that; there are some records in that county or city that will shed light on Theodore or Theophilus Perryman. We are left with the question of whether James Perryman, the half-breed son the Theophilus Perryman and "Chief Perryman", the half-breed son of Theodore Perryman were brothers.
    The early records of the Chattahooche River region also mention several other individuals named Perryman. I can't connect them all together, but we do know something about some of them. Since there definitely are several cases where two men have the same names. I have them a number in brackets to keep them straight in my mind.
    Mary, the daughter of William Perryman (Chief Perryman) [#1], had a son who was called "Little Billy".19 There is a letter dated 25 March 1812, that mentions Billy Perryman who had just returned from "New Providence" (Bahamas).20 An "Indian Willy" is mentioned and thought likely to be William Perryman [#1]. In September 1799 the American Commissioner received a message from "Indian Willy". He was described as a person of property living or the Chattahoochee River, a few miles north of the fork of the Chattachoochee and Flint Rivers. I can't see William Perryman (Chief Perryman) [#1] being called "Indian Willy", so I must assume that it referred to "Little Billy", the son of William Augustus Bowles and Mary Perryman, the daughter of William Perryman (Chief Perryman) [#1].
    There were two brothers, William Perryman [#1] and George Perryman [#1]. William Perryman [#1] was later chief at Telmochesses.21 George Perryman [#1] was a son or nephew of Tom Perryman [#1]. 22 George Perryman [#1] was also known as Iacohaslonaki. He was a Miccosukee Chief in the Lower Apalachiocola region who fled after Jackson invaded Florida in 1818. He escaped to Portsmouth, England, in 1818. 23 There was another George Perryman [#2] who was the care-taker at Fort Scott and lived at Old Fowl Town.24
   There seems to have been two Tom Perrymans during this same period. A Tom Perryman [#1] was a friend of William Augustus Bowles and other one was not. Tom Perryman [#2] is said to have been a kinsman of Bowles' wife, Mary. He angered Bowles in about 1814 and he and his brother were chased across the Wakulla River.25 He came from a town on the chattahoochee River. He also tried to get Tom Perryman [#1] to attack the Americans. 26 The name of the brother of Tom Perryman [#2] in not mentioned.
    The other Tom Perryman [#1] was known by many names: Keniche, Kinache, Kinhijah, Capiche Micco, Opie Micco, and Far Off Warrior. Tom Perryman [#1] lived during the american Revolution above the fork of the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers, but took his followers south in about 1783 and settled at Miccosukee in northern Florida where he became chief of the town. He was born about 1738 and died at Miccosukee in 1818.27 He had a son according to Hawkins who was highly regarded by the British agents during the American Revolution. 28
   Hawkins wrote that there were numerous Seminole chiefs named Perryman and, at least, three were operating in 1811-James, Thomas, and William.29 Thomas was probably Thomas Perryman [#1]. William could have been William Perryman [#1]. The only James Perryman that I have found a mention of is James Perryman, the half-breed son of Theophilus Perryman. The area around the fork of the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers as well as Florida could have been referred to as being in the Seminole region.
    There were mention of a negro Perryman. Polly Perryman, also known as Chehaw Micco Polly, was raised by an English family at Nassau, Bahamas.30 She was taken to Mobile when grown and was sold to James Clark and taken to Pensacola. Clark sold her to Theophilus Perryman. Polly was then sold to Lauchlan McGillivray. Polly lived with the McGillivrays until the McGillivray children were grown and then was sold to Jim Perryman, the half-breed son of Theophilus Perryman. He then sold her to Chehaw Micco. She emigrated to Arkansas with the Creeks in 1836 and died in 1846 at the age of 115.31
   The Colonial Records of Georgia mention a Robert Perryman who in 1737 sold some steers and cows.32 A Daniel Perryman was ordered by William Hambly to capture a man named Stinson who was in the Creek Nation.33 In about the same time, a slave was recaptured and returned to a Daniel Perryman.36
    A Sandy Perryman was a negro interpreter sometime between 1835 and 1842.35 The 1832 Census listed Sandy Perryman. He was listed with three males and two females at Cheehaw.36
   There was even an Indian named Theophilus Perryman mentioned. In June 1836 he was reported as being under guard at Columbus. He had just arrived from the west. He was not hostile and had a friendly disposition, but it was worried that he would try to prevent cooperation of the hostile Creeks concerning emigration. He had a sister who was "strongly allied to the whites by affinity" and who was waiting for his discharge so they could emigrate west of the Mississippi.37
   The Creek Perryman in Oklahoma may not all be descendants of Benjamin Perryman, since there were numerous Creeks and Seminoles named Perryman. There are some Creek Perrymans in Oklahoma who can trace their line to Missouri and not to Benjamin Perryman. There is no evidence that Benjamin Perryman or any of his sons settled in Missouri, so these Missouri Perrymans may be descendants of some other Creek Perryman.
    There is not enough data to prepare the lineage of Benjamin Perryman that shows his ancestry. There is not enough data to show how the numerous Perrymans mentioned above are related except as noted. One possibility and it is only a possibility of the Creek Perryman line follows. The word Micco means "king" in the Creek language, but it is not certain that the individuals below who have that word in their Creek names were, in fact, chiefs of some town.

FIRST GENERATION

1. David Perryman
He came from Virginia and settled and died in Columbia County, Georgia, in 1803. He was probably a grandson or great grandson of Robert Perryman who landed at Skimino, York County, Virginia, in 1666 There is proof of this man.
Issue
1-1_ Theophilus (or Theodore) Perryman

SECOND GENERATION

1-1_ Theophilus (or Theodore) Perryman
There is not enough data to prove that he was a son of David Perryman or that he was from Columbia County, Georgia, where David Perryman lived and died. There is proof that he was a white trader among the Creeks. There may have been a Theophilus and a Theodore Perryman, but I believe that they were the same man.
Issue
1-1-1_ James Perryman
1-1-2_ William Perryman [#1]
1-1-3_ George Perryman [#2]
1-1-4_ Benjamin Perryman
1-1-5_ Thomas Perryman [#1]
1-1-6_ Robert Perryman

THIRD GENERATION

1-1-1_ James Perryman
He was said to be the half-breed (mestizo) son of Theophilus Perryman and had many children. There is proof of this.

1-1-2 William Perryman [#1]
e was probably the half-breed (estizo) son of Theodore Perryman. Theodore=s son was called "Chief Perryman", but most writers believe his name was William Perryman.
Issue

1-1-2-1 Mary Peryman
1-1-2-2 Thomas Perryman [#2]
1-1-2-3 (male) Perryman

1-1-3 George Perryman [#2]

            He lived at Old Fowl Town and was the care-taker at Fort Scott. There is proof of this.

1-1-4 Benjamin Perryman

There is no information that reveals who his father was. One source says that he was born about 1755 in Alabama. He emigrated to Indian Territory in 1828. He could be the chief at Wekiva and friendly toward whites. He was called a half-breed (mestizo) in one source now lost.
Issue

1-1-4-1 Samuel Perryman
1-1-4-2 Columbus Perryman
1-1-4-3 Moses Perryman
1-1-4-4 James Perryman
1-1-4-5 Lewis Perryman
1-1-4-6 Henry Perryman
1-1-4-7 Lydia Perryman
1-1-4-8 Mary Perryman <Susan>

1-1-5 Thomas Perryman [#]

There is no information that reveals who his father was. He was born about 1738 and died in 1818. He lived above the fork of the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers during the American Revolution, but in about 1783 moved his followers south to Florida and settled at Miccosukee where he became chief. He fought on the English side in the American Revolution. He was a half-breed (mestizo). There is proof of this.
Issue

1-1-5-1 (male) Peryman
1-1-5-2 William Perryman [#2]
1-1-5-3 George Perryman [#1]

1-1-6 Robert Perryman

All I can find on him is that he sold some steers and cows in 1737. Because of that date, I have place him in this generation.

FOURTH GENERATION

1-1-2-1 Mary Perryman
Married William Augustus Bowles.
Issue
                    1-1-2-1-1 "Little Willy"

1-1-2-2 Thomas Perryman [#2]
He is reported to have been a kinsman or brother of Mary Perryman. He lived on the Chattahoochee River in 1814. He tried to persuade Thomas Perryman [#1] to attack the Americans.

1-1-2-3 (male) Perryman
He was a brother of Thomas Perryman [#2] and tried to get Thomsa Perryman [#1] to attack the Americans.

1-1-4-1 Samuel Perryman
He was born in Alabama and fought with Jackson in the Creek War of 1813-1814. He died in Coweta, Indian Territory in 1880. His Creek name was Thenahta Tustenugga.

1-1-4-2 Columbus Perryman
He was born in Alabama in about 1777 and died at Coweta, Indian Territory, in 1877. His Creek name was Yahola Harjo.

1-1-4-3 Moses Perryman
He was born in Alabama in about 1766 and died at Choska, Indian Territory, in 1866. His Creek name was Aktayahehe.

1-1-4-4 James Perryman
He was born in Alabama and died in Coweta, Indian Territory, in about 1882. His Creek name was Pahos Harjo.

1-1-4-5 Lewis Perryman
He was born near Fort Mitchell, Alabama, in 1778 and died at Burlington, Kansas, in December 1862. His Creek name was Kochukua Micco.

1-1-4-6 Henry Perryman
He was born in alabama and died near Choska, Indian Territory, in 1876. His Creek name was Kochukua Micco.

1-1-4-7 Lydia Perryman
She was born in Alabama.

1-1-4-8 Mary Perryman <Susan>
She was born in Alabama.

1-1-5-1 (male) Perryman
It is said that Thomas Perryman [#1] had a son.

1-1-5-2 William Perryman [#2]
He was a son or nephew of Thomas Perryman [#1]. He was also known as Iacohaslonaki. He escaped from Florida in 1818 and fled to Portsmouth, England.

1-1-5-3 George Perryman [#2]
He was reported to be a brother of William Perryman [#2] and a son or nephew of Thomas Perryman [#1].

 

1. "The Perrymans", John bartlett Meserve, The Chronicles of Oklahoma, Vol. XV, Page 166,172.

2. Chief William McIntosh, A Man of Two Worlds, George Chapman, Cherokee Publishing Co., Atlanta, Ga., 1988, page 96.

3. "Historic Sites in and around the Jim Woodruff Reservoir Area, Florida-Georgia", Mark F. Boyd, Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 169, River Basin Surveys Papers No. 13, 1958.

4. Fort Gains and Environs, P. C. King, Jr., Warren Enterprises, Auburn, Alabama, 1976, page 13.

5. Georgia Place Names, page 85 and "Georgia Forts, Fort Scott", Georgia Magazine, 17th of the series, Forts Committee, Department of Archives and History, December 1968-January 1969, page 28.

6. Georgia Place Names, Page 176.

7. River Basin Surveys Papers No. 13, page 228.

8. River Basin Surveys Papers No. 13, page 228.

9. William Augustus Bowles, J. Leitch Wright, Jr., University of Georgia Press, 1967, page 122.

10. River Basin Surveys Papers No. 13, Page 228.

11. The Perrymans, compiled by Ralph E. Davison, privately printed, Des Moines, Iowa,  1979, page 22.

12. The Perrymans, page 27.

13. "Perryman of Skimino", Virginia Historical Genealogies, John Bennett Boddie, 1954,  page 133f.

14. Woodward's Reminiscences of the Creek, or Muscogee Indians, Thomas S. Woodward, Barrett & Wimbish, Montgomery, Alabama, 1859,(reprinted in 1939 by the Alabama Book Store), page 107.

15. Colonial Records of Georgia, Vol. VIII, 1759-1762, page 522.

16. Colonial Records of Georgia, Vol. VIII, 1759-1762, page 752.

17. History of Decatur County, Georgia, page 116.

18. The King's Ranger, Edward J. Cashin, University of Georgia Press, 1989, page 169.

19. The King's Ranger, page 184.

20. W.P.A. Project - Indian Letters, 1782-1839, from John McKee to Benjamin Hawkins.

21. River Basin Surveys Papers, No. 13, page 228.

22. River Basin Surveys Papers, page 235.

23. Creeks and Seminoles, J. Leitch Wright, Jr., University of Nebraska Press, 1986,    page 213.

24. Georgia Place Names, page 176.

25. William Augustus Bowles, page 66.

26. Africans and Creeks, Daniel F. Littlefield, Jr., Greenwood Press, 1979, page 70.

27. Creeks and Seminoles, page 127 and 214.

28. Letters, Journals and Writing of Benjamin Hawkins, Vol. II, 1802-18116, edited by C. L. Grant, The Beehive Press, Atlanta, Ga., 1980, page 591.

29. Letters, Journals and Writings of Benjamin Hawkins, Vol. II, 1802-1816, page 591.

30. W.P.A. Project - Creek Indian Letters, 1705-1839, Part 3, page 878b.

31. Woodward's Reminiscences of the Creek, or Muscogee Indians, Page 107.

32. Colonial Records of Georgia, Vol. II, 1732-1752. Page 214.

33. W.P.A. Project - Creek Indian Letters, 1705-1839, part 3, page 878b.

34. Africans and Creeks, page 99.

35. Creeks and Seminole, page 278,

36. Africans and Creeks, page 115.

37. Creek Indian Letters, Talks, and Treaties, 1830-1839, Part 4, page 1368.

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Barbadoes Records 1675-1800

PERRYMAN
Ann
Benjamin Rawlins
Catharine
Christian
EdmundEdward
Eliza
Elizabeth
Frances
Francis
Janes
Jno
John
John Edward
John Wm
Margaeret
Mary
Mary Ann
Mary Frances
Mercy
Nicholas Robson
Richard
Richard Francis
Robert
Robert Richard
Samuel
Susanna
William Edmund
William Thomas

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Linda Cooper <lcooper@htcomp.net>
    My 2nd greatgrand-uncle, John W. Grace b March 17, 1880-d1834 was married to Moleazor (Melissa) Perryman. I have not info on her except that she was a Creek Indian Princess who deeded 6000 acres by gift to her husband, being her share of the Creek Lands. She was moved to Oklahoma on the Trail of Tears.

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Creek Census 1832  (Lower Creeks)
EUFAULA
Elsey Perryman    2 females
John Perryman      1 male   1 female
James Perryman    1 male  1 female

CHEHAWAH
Sandy Perryman, (a free Black)  3 male 2 female

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Mobile Genealogical Society Quarterly Vol. 9, August-November 1971 & 1972
FORBES TRADING COMPANY
    The Panton, Leslie and company was established in Mobile in 1792 by William Panton. He had as "silent partners" the notable Alexander McGillivray and John Forbes. Panton, Leslie and Company's headquarters was inPensacola, Florida with branches in Mobile, Baton Rouge, New Orleans, Natchez, Liverpool, the Bahamas and other smaller towns. William Panton died in 1804 and this British company became known as the Forbes Company. The papers that survived became known as the "Forbes Papers".
    The following list of debts owed to Panton, Leslie and Company by Indian traders and/or factors at the Appalachy store. Also listed is an account of the loses by the robberies commited by Indians under the leadership of Bowles 1792-1800.
Perryman, William
Perryman, James
Perryman, Thomas
    The following is a list of debts due by the traders and factors of the Creek Nation at the store of Panton, Leslie and Company in Pensacola. (no date)
Perryman, William
Perryman, Thomas

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THE PERRYMAN FAMILY
Ralph E. Davidson 1140 63st, Des Moines Iowa
Some History of the Creek Indians
    The Creek people referred to their nation as the "Muscogee Nation" in their native language, though, in general Oklaholma history it is called "The Creek Nation." This powerful Indian tribe lived among the brooks and streams of Georgia and northern Alabama. It was here, some of the early English Colonist and traders came to explore and searach for homes. There was a large Coweta settlement on the lower course of the Chattahoochee river, which flows from North Georgia south along a part of the boudary between Georgia and Alabama into the Apalachicola river (about 500 miles). It was in this locality that Benjamin Perryman, son of David Perryman, of Maryland, came to explore and finally settle down on the frontier. Others who came in these early expeditions, were the Winsletts, Wards, Porters and Perrymans. There were inter-marriages between these early frontiersmen and Creek Indian maidens. In the earliest migrations by the white man, there were no white women who came to the new wild country. Later a few ventured to come, when the white mans families began to settle the region.
    Among the names mentioned in these inter-marriages were: the Winsletts, Wards, Porters and Perrymnans. Also the members of the tribe were adopting English names for signing legal documents, listing in the U.S. Census and other conveniences.
    When the Chief of the Lower Creeks William Mc Intosh, was assassinated at his plantation home on the Chattahoochee river near  the present town of Carrollton, Carroll County, Georgia in April 1825; the murder provoked the withdrawal, shortly thereafter, of many of his relatiaves and friends from Georgia and Alabama to the old Indian territory. The Chief's home was also burned by his assailants. The eldest son, Chilli Mc Intosh, led the initial contingent of these people to the west.

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David Perryman Lunenburg Co., Va or a descendant married Indian Princess of Creek
1758 Sept Lunenburg Co., Va.
And whereas several companies oof the Militia were lately drown into actual service fore the defence and protection of the frontier of this colony, whose names and the time they respectively continued in said service, all contained in the schedule to this act annexed-treasurer shall within 3 months after passing of this act-pay to officers and praivate soldiers--the sums to which they are thereby respectively entitled.
(in list of name) David Perryman                 signed King George II

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2002 by Joan Case
Last updated on Sunday, November 10, 2002