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JOHN GEARHART, farmer, Sec. 4; P.O. Worthington; born in Pennsylvania Oct. 23, 1827; came to Dubuque Co. in 1849; has a farm of 225 acres in Secs. 3,4 and 6; in addition to farming, he carried on, until the last  four or five years, his occupation as a stonemason, being greatly assisted by his family during this time, in the management of his farm.  Religion, Reformed Church; politics, Democratic.  Mr. G. was married, March 10, 1853, to Miss Lavina Fogleman, of Pennsylvania; they have eight children- William H., John C., Lydia S., Charles R., Edwin W., Jacob F., Bertha J. and Rosa Lovina.   pg.912
R.S. GEE, proprietor of the Dubuque Remedial and Surgical Institution, 970 Main street, Dubuque; is a native of Canada, and was born in Toronto Oct. 2, 1822; he grew up and attended school there; at the age of 17, he engaged in teaching school, still pursuing his studies; in 1844, he came to the United States and attended Albion College, Michigan; he afterward entered mercantile life; having a taste for professional life, in 1853 he located in Detroit and began the study of medicine; in 1857, he left Detroit and began lecturing through the country upon homeopathy; he has delivered over twenty-five hundred lectures, and has published over thirty thousand pamphlets; he is deeply interested in treating chromic disease; he came to Dubuque, and, in April 1874, established "The Remedial and Surgical Institute;" treats patients homeopathically, and, as an adjunct, uses thirty-four different kinds of baths, and with great success; he has fitted up his baths with the most improved appliances, and is very successful in his treatment of chronic diseases that cannot be controlled by ordinary methods of treatment; the honorary degree of M.D. was conferred upon him by Cleveland Homeopathic College.    pg. 792
ANDREW GEHRIG, tailor, corner of Main and Fifth streets, residence 1036 White street, Dubuque;  was born in Switzerland Feb. 7, 1826;  he grew up and and learned the tailor's trade, and came to United States in 1855; came to Dubuque May 19 of the same year; and began working at his trade; in 1867, he began business for himself, and has carried it on since then; he is one of the oldest tailors in the city.  In 1851, he married Dorothea Boul, a native of Switzerland; they have had seven children, five of whom are living- Doc A. (now City Treasurer). Emile, Lena. Amelia and Emma.  Mr. Gehrig belongs to Schiller Lodge, No. 11, I.O.O.F., and to the Humbold Encampment; also belongs to the Germany Benevolent Society and to the Knights of Honor.  pg. 792
D.A. GEHRIG, City Treasurer of Dubuque; is a native of Switzerland and was born Feb. 16, 1852; his parents came to Dubuque in 1855, when he was only 3 years of age; he grew up and attended school here; in 1874, he went into the office of the City Treasurer, and afterward went in the office of the County Treasurer, V.J. Williams; in January, he was appointed Deputy County Treasurer, and held that position until April, 1880, when he received the nomination and was elected City Treasurer, and is the youngest person ever elected to that office in the city. In 1875, Mr. Gehrig was united in marriage to Miss Frances Kistler,a native of Michigan; they have two children-Frances and Flora.  Mr. Gehrig  belongs to Schiller Lodge, I.O.O.F., and the Iowa Lodge, A.O.U.W., and the German Shooting Society.    pg. 792
JOSEPH GEHRIG, proprietor of the Jefferson House, corner White and Seventh streets; was born in Switzerland  Dec. 26, 1820; he grew up and learned  the trade of shoemaker; he emigrated to America in November, 1844, and came to Dubuque June 1, 1845; he began work in Lorimer's stone quarry; in 1849, he went to California overland, and arrived in Sacramento in December; there were no houses and only fourteen tents where the city of Sacramento is now located; he dug the first cellar in Sacramento; he remained in California until 1851, then returned to Dubuque and bought the lots where his hotel stands; Mr. O'Connell was hung and was buried on this same corner. Mr. Gehrig began building the hotel in 1854, and completed in 1856, and it is one of the largest houses in the city; he rented it for a whole, and then has conducted it himself for many years; he gives it his personal attention; there are very few hotels that have so large a basement floor, so well filled with meats and vegetables, and stores of all kinds, and everything so neat and clean as that of the Jefferson House; when he began life, he had nothing, and, by industry and good management, he has acquired a nice property.  He married Miss Oursala Kiene Sept. 26, 1851; she was born in Switzerland, and is a sister of Peter Kiene; she died in 1872, leaving six children- Mary, Lena, Paul, Henry, John and Joseph.   pg. 792-793
HENRY GEIGER, carpenter and builder,White street, between Sixteenth and Seventeenth streets,Dubuque;was born in Baden, Germany, May 28, 1840, he came to America in 1861. He enlisted in Co. F, 5th I.V.C.; served over one year; then served for two years in the engineer corps at Nashville; he returned to Dubuque in 1867, and since then has been engaged in his present business.  He belongs to Schiller Lodge I.O.O.F. He married Anna Hug, from Baden, Germany, in 1868; she died 1872; left one son-Henry; in 1875, he married Mary Marty, from Sherrill's Mound, this county; they have three children- Lizzie, Edward and Rosa.    pg. 793
JOHN GEORGE, merchant, proprietor of a hotel, etc., Centralia; born in Germany in 1829; he came to Dubuque Co., Iowa in 1854; for twenty years, he worked at his occupation of machinist in the city of Dubuque; the past six years he has been in Centralia, engaged in the combined vocation of merchant, hotel-keeper, etc.; besides his hotel and store in Centralia, he has seventy-four acres of land in Sec. 5, Vernon Township, and a house and lot on the corner of Tenth and Jackson streets, in Dubuque.  Religion, Catholic; politics, Democratic.  In 1856, he was married in Dubuque to Miss Mary Kudnacker, also a native of Germany; they have seven children-John, Lena, Annie, Katie, Mary, Caroline and Lizzie.     pg.962
C.R. GIBBS, of the firm of Gibbs & Co., livery, sale and boarding stable, No. 139 Fourth street, Dubuque; is a son of the late R.J. Gibbs, who came to Dubuque in 1857; he had charge of putting in the Dubuque water works; he was extensively engaged in the grain business here for many years; he shipped the first cat load of grain over the Illinois Central Railroad.  He died in March, 1875, leaving a widow and four sons, all living here. The present firm of Gibbs & Co., was established in 1876; they have a large stock of good horses and fine carriages and buggies, and have built up a large trade.     pg. 793
DENNIS GILLIAN, stationary engineer, machine shops Illinois Central Railroad, Dubuque; was born in County Antrim, Ireland, only two miles from Giant's Causeway, June 24, 1815; he grew up manhood, and served in the army under William IV; he served under Victoria when she was proclaimed Queen, and when she was crowned, and when she was married. In 1841,  he came to Canada; he helped build the Prince Albert, the first iron boat built this side of the ocean; he saw the Parliament House burned there, April 8, 1850;  he came to Iowa and settled in Dubuque, Sept. 1, 1850; he made the first boiler work dine in Dubuque. In 1863, he entered the employ of the Illinois Central Railroad, and has been connected with the company seventeen years. He married  Miss Eliza J. McGowan, from County Donegal, Ireland, Jan 1, 1841; they have seven children- John, William, Charles, Maggie, Ellen, Hugh, Dora; they have lost six children.      pg. 793
M. GILLEAS, Roadmaster of the Iowa Division of the Illinois Central Railroad, Dubuque; was born Sept. 23, 1844; when 14 years of age, he entered the employ of the Illinois Central Railroad, and he has been connected with this company over twenty-two years; he was appointed Roadmaster of the Iowa Division of the road in 1877, though he has performed the same character of duties fro the past fifteen years.  Mr. Gilleas was united in marriage to Miss Mary McDonald, from LaSalle Co., Ill., Dec. 25, 1867; they have five  children- one son and four daughters.      pg. 793
THOMAS F. GILLIAM, of the firm of  Poole, Gilliam & Co., wholesale grocers, 272 Main street, Dubuque; is a native of Morgan Co., Ill., and was born in Jacksonville June 22, 1832; when 14 years of age, his parents came to  Iowa, and located in Dubuque April 1, 1846; after reaching  manhood,  he engaged in mercantile business, and has been connected with the firm of  Poole, Gilliam & Co., since its organization in 1870. Mr. Gilliam was united in marriage April 11, 1854, to Miss Elizabeth A. Shields, daughter of the late Gen. John G. Shields; they have four children- William S., Ida Virginia, John A.H., and James W.R.      pg. 793
ADAM GLAB, brewer and malster, proprietor of the  Northern Brewery, Couler avenue, Dubuque;  was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, Nov. 17, 1828; he emigrated to America in 1852, and came to Dubuque the same year;  he engaged in mining, and carried on that business for twenty-five years, and is still interested in mining; in 1866, he built his present large brewery at a cost of  $50,000 and engaged in brewing business, and manufactures about four thousand barrels annually; when he came here he had nothing, and owes his success to his own industry and management. In 1851, he married Miss Kathrina Wemer, from Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany; they have had eight children; six are living- Nicholas, Allie, Frank, Louise, Maggie and Katie.  Mr. Glab's parents are both living near him; his father is 80 years old, and his mother is 77 years of age.      pg. 793-794
JOHN GLAB, proprietor of the Mississippi Valley Vinegar Works, foot of ninth street, Dubuque; is a native of  Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, and was born Nov. 11, 1834; he emigrated to America in 1854, and came direct to Dubuque. After a few years, he engaged in the wood business, and continued in that for ten years; then engaged in the distilling business for five years; then he established his present business, in 1873, and he has built up a large trade; he makes his vinegar from grain, and ships his goods from Davenport south, to two hundred miles north of St. Paul, and through the West; he also ships quite largely to Chicago. When he began life he had nothing, and owes his success to his own efforts. He married Miss Louise Wagner, a native of Germany, in 1861; they have six children- John N. (book-keeper for his father), Lena, Frankie, Henry, Louise, Leo; they have lost one son- John.     pg. 794
ALEXANDER GLEWfarmer, Sec. 35; P.O. Cottage Hill; born Jan. 29, 1823 in Center Co., Penn.; in 1838, he came to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he now owns 375 acres land; part of this land he entered.  Has been Constable, Township Treasurer, President of the School Board, etc.  Married Amanda M. Waltham in 1845; she was born in Illinois; have seven children- Elizabeth A., J.M.., William, Sarah J., John, Emanuel W. and Ida.     pg.958
H.B. GLOVER, of the firm of H.B. Glover & Co., wholesale dealers in dry goods and notions, 744 to 752 Main street; manufactures of overalls, corner Iowa and Sixth streets, Dubuque;  is a native of  Newtown, Conn., and was born July 24, 1837; he came West to Iowa and located in Dubuque in 1856. He established their dry goods business in 1860, and transacted a retail department and wholesale trade for a number of years; in 1876, he gave up the retail department, and since then their business has been exclusively wholesale.  In 1877, they engaged in  manufacturing overalls and pants and vests, and this has become a very important part of their business, and is constantly increasing.     pg. 794
PETER GOAN, foreman of planing-mill of Ingraham, Kennedy & Day, residence 25 Rose street; is a native of  Somerset Co., Penn., and was born  Jan. 22, 1832; he grew up to manhood in that State, and learned the trade of carpenter and joiner, steamboat joiner and woodwork machinery, serving an apprenticeship  of nine years; he came West to Chicago in 1854, and came to Dubuque April 14, 1855, and was foreman of J.L. Dickinson's planing- mill, and held that position some years; he went to California in 1862; remained three years, and returned in 1865; he was superintendent of the Key City Planing-mill, and held that position ten years; he was appointed to his present position in July, 1879. He belongs to Harmony Lodge, I.O.O.F., and to Haleyon Encampment and to the Order of A.O.U.W.  In November, 1855, Mr. Goan was united in marriage to Miss Emily Cain; she was born in Indiana, but came in infancy to Dubuque; they have seven children-Emma F., Orrin S., Lola E., Walter U., Nettie M., Mabel M. and Harry.     pg. 794
M.D. GOBLE, dental surgeon, office 852 Locust street, Dubuque; is a native of Champaign Co., Ohio, and was born Feb. 5, 1844, and came to Dubuque in 1856; grew up  and attended school here; studied dentistry here and in Cincinnati; in 1865 and 1866, attended lectures in Medical College in Cincinnati.  He practiced  dentistry in Monroe, Wis. from 1861 until 1866, when he came Dubuque, and since then he has practiced his profession here; has a large practice. He has held the position of President of the Northern Iowa Dental Association.  In November, 1868, Dr. Goble was united in marriage to Miss Isabel Van Wagener from Racine, Wis.; they have one daughter-Kittie C.     pg. 794
THEODOR GOERDTfarmer,  Sec. 20 ; P.O. Dyersville; born Oct. 15, 1824,  in Germany; in 1850,  came to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he owns 200 acres of land, part of which he entered. He has been President of the School Board and Director.  Married Barbara Huter Sept. 3, 1850; she was born in Germany;   they had thirteen children; six now living- Theodor, Elizabeth, Anna, Mary, Katie and Joseph. Catholic.
JOHN GOLDTHORPE,    farmer, Sec. 9,; P.O. Dubuque; he was born in July 27, 1808, in Yorkshire, England; in 1829, he came to Philadelphia, coming on the ship John Wells; in February, 1832, he came to Galena, and there engaged in mining; the following years, he removed to Blue Mound, Wis., still following mining; in 1836, he came to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he owns about 405 acres of land; a large part is under cultivation, which he has cleared and improved, with substantial buildings, etc.  He married Alice Cocker Jan. 1, 1833; who was born in Lancaster, England, in August, 1808; they have four children- George W., Edward, Sarah J. and John R.; Hames was born March 10, 1836; was killed while mining on Mr. Rooney's farm, Jan. 18, 1865; George W. enlisted in 1861 in a Dubuque battery as gunner; he was afterward promoted to Sergeant, and served to the end of the war.     pg. 967
S. GOODALEproprietor of the American House, Farley; is a native of Lewis Co., N.Y., and was born Dec. 9, 1825; he grew up to manhood and lived in that State until 1866, when he came to Delaware Co., and located in Farley; he engaged in the hotel business and opened the American House in 1868; he built one part, and, in 1872, he enlarged it by building an addition; it is an attractive, well-kept hotel; Mr. Goodale is also engaged in the livery business, and he has had the contract for carrying the mail from Farley to Cascade for the past six years; he has held the offices of Assessor, Town Trustee and school offices. In 1854, he was united in marriage to Miss M.E. Hubbard, a native of Jefferson Co., N.Y.  They have four children- Leon H., Everitt V. and Edna V. (twins), and Clark F.     pg.936
W.A. GOODING, of the firm of  Gooding & Co., lumbermen, No. 860 Bluff street, Dubuque; is a native of Illinois, and was born at Lockport, Will Co., Jan. 4, 1833; during the same year, his parents came in the stage that carried the first mail around the head of Lake Michigan, from Niles to Chicago; he grew up to manhood and received his education in that city and vicinity.  In 1852, he became connected with the management of the Illinois and Michigan Canal; he became the assistant of John B. Preston, the Superintendent, and afterward succeeded him as Superintendent of the canal; he occupied that position until after the canal passed into the hands of the State, in 1870; and he is now the only person living who is familiar with the government in detail of the extended interests of  the Illinois and Michigan Canal.  After retiring from the management of the canal, Mr. Gooding spent one year in Cuba, and three years in Africa; he visited the gold fields and the diamond fields, and traveled extensively through that tropical country; after his return to the United States, he engaged in the lumber business in Wisconsin; in 1877, he came to Dubuque, and established his business here, and he has built up the largest lumber trade done in Dubuque.     pg. 794-795
CHARLES GOODMANN, farmer, Sec., 28; P.O. Rickardsville; was  born Jan, 6, 1823, in Germany; in 1847, he came to Pittsburgh, Penn,; the following year, he removed to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he owns 160 acres of land.  Married Mary Miller in May 1847; she was born in Germany; they have nine children- Henry, Charles, Julius, Berthie, Louis, Mary, Matilda, Ernest and William.  Protestant.     pg.949
SMITH GORDON, farmer, Sec. 30, Worthington.  His father, Ransom S. Gordon, was born July 22, 1800, in New York; he died Aug. 14, 1879; he came to this locality in 1855, where the family have lived ever since; they own 100 acres of land  He was married to Miss Rachael Little in 1839;she was born Jan. 1, 1815, in Ireland; they had seven children, five living- Ransom S., Smith, Ira, Henry and Lois.  Ransom and Smith served in the late war.  Scott enlisted in 1862 in C. H, 9th N. H. V. I., and died of army disease in 1865. Stimson enlisted in 1862 in Co. C, Second Battalion, 12th U.S. Infantry, and was killed at the battle of the Wilderness May 5, 1864.    pg.956
JACOB GOSDENfarmer and veterinary surgeon, Sec. 7; P.O. Cascade; born near London, England, June 22, 1817; came to America and settled in Dubuque Co., Iowa, in May 1852; his farm consists of 220 acres in Secs. 7, 8 and 18, Whitewater Township, and Secs. 12 and 13, Cascade Township; his farming business includes the raising of stock of all kinds, and he has an unequaled reputation as a veterinary surgeon; his practice in this profession extends twenty, thirty, and even forty miles from his home; the fine horses on his farm testify to his love of this noble animal, of whose disposition and ailments he has such accurate knowledge.  Mr. G. is a member of the Episcopal Church; in politics, his leading principle is to vote for the best men for official positions.  He was married, in 1852, to Miss Ann Rice, a native of England; they have five children-Rosa, Henry, Fannie, May and Emily.     pg.921
NICHOLAS GOTTO, general merchandise, Sec. 20; P.O. Pin Oak; born June 6, 1841, in Prussia; in 1868, he came to Michigan, thence to Chicago, Ill.; in 1870, he removed to Dubuque Co., and commenced his present business; he owns eighty acres of land, also five lots in Georgetown, with the wagon and blacksmith shop, and carries  on quite an extensive business.  He married Mary E. McGuire May 2, 1871; she was born in Concord Township; they have one child- Anna F.; they lost Mary E. in infancy.  Roman Catholic.        pg.958
WILLIAM GRAHAM, attorney at law, of the firm of Graham & Cady, corner Main and Seventh streets; is a native of Orange Co., N.Y. and was born March 2, 1831; he grew up and received his education in that State; graduated at Union College, Schenectady, N.Y., in 1851; he studied law with Judge Monell, of Newburg, N.Y., and was admitted to the bar in Brooklyn in January 1856; he came West during the same year, and located in Bellevue, Jackson Co. and engaged in the practice of law with Judge John B. Booth;  he remained there until the fall of 1867, when he came to Dubuque, and since then has practiced his profession here. He has held the office of City Attorney; he was tendered the nomination for Judge of the District Court by the Democratic party; he has been repeatedly solicited to become a candidate for different offices, but has steadily declined them, preferring to devote his whole time to his profession.  Mr. Graham  was united in marriage, June 16, 1858 to Miss Harriet Watson, daughter of Hon, Malborne Watson, Judge of the Supreme Court, Catskill, N.Y.; Mr. and Mrs. Graham have four children- William, Malborne W., Henry L. and Helen.     pg.795
DAVID GRANT, shoer of fine horses, corner Locust and Seventh streets, Dubuque; is a native of  Ireland, and was born June 19, 1840; he came to the United States in 1850, and came to Dubuque in 1860; he learned his trade here, and, in 1864, and engaged in business for himself, and has carried it on since then, and has built up a good trade. He married Miss Mary Ann O'Shea Nov. 27, 1864; they have two children- Ida M. and Margaret A.     pg.795
J.K. GRAVES, capitalist, Dubuque; is a native of  Keene, N.H., and was born Sept. 29, 1837, and is a son of Caleb S. and Eliza Graves; his early education was gained at the common schools of his native town; at the age of 17, he left home and began life for himself; securing a situation in a bank as clerk and correspondent, he gave the day to his duties and attended evening schools, and, by his diligent study, made rapid progress.  In 1855,
he came West to Iowa and settled in Dubuque, accepting the position of cashier in the banking house of  M. Mobley & Co., which, in 1858, was succeeded by the firm of J.K. Graves & Co., which did a very successful business until it was merged into a branch of the State Bank of Iowa, of which he was Vice President and General Manager; he was also a member of the Board of Control of the State Bank of Iowa; the National State Bank succeeding this branch, he was one of the principal organizers of it, and, for a time, its Vice President; he was also prominent in organizing the Commercial National Bank, of which he was a large stockholder and Director; he has been identified with the Key City Gas Works since 1859, and, in 1866, he built the works, which supply the city with light, and of which he is President, Director, and a large stockholder.  In 1868, Mr. Graves took an active part in the organization and construction of the Dubuque Street Railway, of which he been President the greater portion of the time.  During the early days of the rebellion, he was appointed by Gov. Kirkwood, of Iowa, Post Quartermaster at Camp Franklin, Dubuque, with rank of Colonel, having at one time nearly six thousand men in Camp. In 1866, he was elected on the Republican ticket Mayor of Dubuque by a large majority over his Democratic opponent in a city strongly Democratic; in 1876, Mr. Graves was elected representative of the State Legislature; in 1870, he was induced to turn his attention to the construction of a new railroad from Dubuque to Chicago, which road is now in successful operation sixty miles down the river to Clinton; he is President  of the Chicago, Clinton & Dubuque Railway Company, the Chicago, Dubuque & Minnesota Railway Company, and the Iowa Pacific, and he has been earnest and active in every enterprise tending to develop the interests of Dubuque and vicinity.  He was appointed Special Commissioner by the Interior  Department, and twice visited Mexico on the duties of his mission.  In politics he is a Republican, and an earnest advocate of its principles. He is a member of the Masonic Fraternity for a number of years. He was united in marriage Sept. 12, 1860, to Miss Lucy C. Robinson of Salem, Mass.; they have five children- Luin K., J.K., Jr., Sybil, Sara, and Marjorie. Mr. Graves  has one of the most pleasant, attractive homes in Dubuque; it is situated on the Bluff, commanding the finest view on the Mississippi from St. Paul to St. Louis.  pg. 795-796
R.E. GRAVES, President of the Commercial National Bank of Dubuque; is a native of Keene, N.H., and was born Aug. 8. 1835; his early boyhood was spent on a farm, and he received his early education at the common school and academy of his native town; at the age of 16, with a capital of $13, his own savings, he left home to begin life for himself; he secured a situation in a bank, and, by his diligence in attending to his duties, at the age of 19 he was elected cashier of the Brighton Market Bank, being selected out of thirty-six applicants for the position; in 1858, he came West to Iowa and located in Dubuque; in November of the same year, he established the Dubuque Branch of the State Bank of Iowa, and was elected its cashier; he continued until 1863, when he accepted the position of cashier of one of the leading banks of Chicago; he was offered the position of United States Tax Commissioner at Charleston, S.C., which was declined; in 1867, upon the consolidation of the National State Bank and the First National Bank of Dubuque, Mr. Graves was offered the management, and in March was elected President of the First National Bank; he afterward disposed of his interest and resigned his position intending to remove East, having been offered the  Presidency of a bank there, but, by the advice and earnest persuasion of his friends, he organized the Commercial National Bank, of which he is the President; under its present able management, it has become one of the solid banking institutions of the State;  Mr. Graves is actively identified with the educational interests of the city, and has done much for the cultivation and advancement of music and art.  On the 10th of Feb. 1859, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary C. Tilden, of Keene, N.H.     pg.796
JOHN GREENLEY, farmer, Sec. 26; P.O. Rickardsville; was born May 23, 1806 in Yorkshire, England; in 1838, he came to Dubuque Co.; he has owned from two hundred to three hundred acres of land, which has been divided amongst  his children; he now owns thirty-five acres.  Married Alley J. Dobson Jan. 28, 1828; she was born Jan. 9, 1807 and died Sept. 15, 1855; they have five children- Ann, Jane, George, William and Elizabeth; William enlisted in 1861, in the 9th I.V.I,: was wounded in the battle of Pea Ridge.  Second marriage to Mrs. Cook in September 1856; she was born July 25, 1802 in Northumberland, England; she has nine children by a former marriage- John, William, Joseph, Walter, Mary, Elizabeth and Jane (twins), Robert and Thomas.  Richard C. Cook enlisted in 1862, in Co. C, 21st I.V.I.; was killed in the battle of Black River Bridge.  Thomas Cook enlisted in 1861, in the 9th I.V.I.; was wounded at the battle of Vicksburg, for which he draws a pension. M.E. Church.    pg.949
CHARLES H. GREGOIRE, retired; residence Fifth street and Alpine to Nevada street, Dubuque; is a native of  St. Genevieve, Mo., and was born June 10, 1821; his parents came to Wisconsin in 1835, when he was only 14 years of age, and after a few years returned to Missouri, he grew up to manhood mostly in Missouri; he began lead mining when only 17 years of age; he came to Dubuque in 1853, and the family came in 1855; he had charge of the first freight that crossed the river after the Illinois Central Railroad reached Galena; he was connected with, and engaged in running, the ferry for many years until 1866; since then, he has not been actively engaged in business here except at intervals in buying grain; he still retains large mining interests in Madison Co., Mo.; he had nothing when he began life, and his success is owning to his own efforts and good management. Mr. Gregoire was united in marriage to Miss Mary Janis, a native of St. Genevieve, Mo., Nov. 6, 1849; they have three children. two sons-Jules C., and Cyril., engaged in business here; and one daughter, Ida, at home.   pg.796
CHARLES H. GREMMELSfarmer, Sec. 14; P.O. Dubuque; born July 14, 1837, in Hanover, Germany; in 1854, he came with his parents to Dubuque Co. where he has since lived; he owns 157 acres of land in this county, also 160 acres in Fayette Co. Has been Township Treasurer for three years, and just been re-elected to the same office for three years more; he is Treasurer of the Farmers' Fire Ins. Co. He married Anna Bartles in 1865; she was born Nov. 4, 1837, in Hanover; she died Dec. 4, 1875; have three children-Henrietta, Anna and Charles H.  He married his second wife, Mary Kempe, April 15, 1876; she was born in Dubuque Co.; they have two children-William and Frieda.  His father was born Jan. 4, 1809 in Hanover; he married Catherine Ahrens in 1835; she was born April 6, 1810, in Hanover; they had seven children, two living- Charles H. and Hannah.  They are Lutheran in religion.    pg.962

JOHN M. GRETHER,  carpenter and builder, 1539 Washington street; is a native of Germany, and was born in Baden Nov. 16, 1816; he grew up to manhood and learned his trade there, after serving in the army eight years; he held the responsible position of Superintendent of Building Fort, at Rasdatd, for eleven years, and had charge of 2,200 men; during the winter season, he was engaged in draughtsman;  he came to the United States in 1854, and came to Dubuque the same year and began working at his trade; he is a natural mechanic and can make any kind of machinery; he belongs to the Order of I.O.O.F. He married Augusta Lembke, from Mecklenburg, Germany, June 7, 1859; he has one son- Henry, and one daughter-Louise; they are as contented and happy a household as there is in Dubuque.    pg.796
WILLIAM GRIFFIN, foreman of machine-shops Illinois Central Railroad, Dubuque; is a native of England; was born April 25, 1841; he grew up to manhood there, and came to the United States in 1861; he came to Chicago and entered the employ of the Chicago & North-Western Railway for a short time; in July, 1864, he the employ of the Illinois Central Railroad, and has been connected with this road for sixteen years;  he came to Dubuque in 1866; he was appointed to his present position May 1, 1876; he belongs to the Masonic Order, Metropolitan Lodge No.49, and is also a member of Harmony Lodge No. 2, I.O.O.F. Mr. Griffin was united in marriage to Miss Almeda Johnson, a native of Ohio, in November, 1866;  they have four children-Annie May, Mary Belle, Jesse Glen and Lillie Maud.    pg.797
CAPT. ISAAC GRIFFITH, is a native of Bedford Co., Penn., and was born June 1, 1836; when 16 years of age, he came with his parents to Iowa, in 1852; they located in Delaware Co.; he came to this county, and entered a store in Cascade. After the war broke out, he enlisted, in 1862, in the 21st I.V.I., he was in the service three years, and participated in the battles of Vicksburg, Port Gibson, Black River Bridge, Mobile and others; after the war, he returned to Iowa; was in Des Moines and also in Chicago for a time; in September, 1868, he became connected with the revenue service, and since then has served in this department.  In January, 1862, he was united in marriage to Miss Lucy Bowling, a native of Virginia; they have two children, both daughters- Nettie and Elsie.    pg.797
JUSTIES GRIMME farmer, Sec. 5; P.O. Sherrill's Mount; born Aug. 21, 1818 in Hanover, Germany; in 1848, he  came to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; they own and occupy the farm formerly settled on by Mrs., Grimme's parents, consisting of 160 acres; he has been School Director and is President of the School Board.  He married Miss Catharine Ihlers Dec. 14, 1850; she was born Oct. 14, 1833, in Hanover; she came to America with her parents in 1844; they have six children- Justies (now holding the office of Constable, having been elected in 1879, he has received quite a liberal education) Edward, Henry, Ferdinand, George and Vernon.  Attends M.E. Church.   pg.973
WILLIAM GROGAN, son if Bernard and Margaret Grogan, was born March 26, 1850, in Onondaga Co., N.Y.; he is a brickmason and plasterer by trade, he moved, with his parents, to Jones Co., Iowa in 1855; he commenced business for himself about 1868, after serving an apprenticeship with his father, and, in January, 1879, located in the town of Cascade, Dubuque Co., where he has continued to follow his trade.  He was married the 10th of January, 1879, to Miss Katie Conwell, the only child of John and Alice Conwell; they also reside in Cascade.   pg.912
FREDERICK A. GNIFFKE, publisher of the Dubuque National Demokrat; is a native of Germany, and was born in Dantzic, Western Prussia, on the Baltic, March 21, 1833; he came to the United States in 1850; he entered the office of the Newburyport Herald, where he learned the printing business; he worked at his trade in Boston and Cambridge; he came West to Iowa and located in Dubuque, in May 1856, and the following August he established the Dubuque National Demokrat, and since then, for a period of twenty-four years, he has continued the publication of that paper, and, what is very remarkable, with the exception of a few numbers-not more than six of eight- he has helped to make up, or contributed to, every issue of the paper.  The paper is conducted with ability, and has a large circulation and a larger influence, in the city and the county and throughout this section of the State.  In the fall of 1859, Mr. Gniffke was elected to the State Legislature, and served during the regular session and during the extra war session; he has been a member of the Board of Education for some years, and, at the recent city election, was again elected for three years. In 1863,  Mr. Gniffke was united in marriage to Miss Alvine Baade, a native of Mecklenburg, Germany; she came to Dubuque with her parents in 1850; Mr. and Mrs. Gniffke have one son-Henry B.     pg. 798
EDWARD A. GUILBERT, M.D.  Dubuque; was born in Watertown, Jefferson Co., N.Y., on the 12th of June, 1826; he attended public schools, and also received instruction in the Black River Institute, at Watertown; in 1837, his father's family moved to Chicago.  His professional studies were commenced in the year 1843, and, after a four-years course, he graduated at Rush Medical College, Chicago; for several years he was the confidential student in the office of the late eminent Prof. Daniel Brainerd. In 1847, he married Miss Kathleen Somers, a young lady of education and refinement, having had the benefit of a course of study in the famous academy of Mrs. Emma Willard, of Troy, N.Y. Nine children have been born to them, six of whom survive. He practiced medicine and surgery first in Ottawa, and afterward in Waukegan, Ill. In that time, 1847 to 1852, he still pursued medial studies and investigations with all the interest of an enthusiastic student.  About this time, Dr. Guilbert resolved to practice medicine upon a different system- that of Hahnemann, and since known as  homeopathy. He soon afterward removed to Elgin, Ill., and commenced his changed practice, having thoroughly studied the literature and theory of that school of medicine. In 1857,  he came to Iowa and located at Dubuque, and engaged in the practice of  his profession. In the war of the rebellion, he was appointed Surgeon of the Board of Enrollment for the Third Congressional District of Iowa, and discharged the responsible duties of that position from 1862 to 1865. During the war, he gave his influence to encourage enlistments for the volunteer service, and was chosen Captain of Co. A, of the 46th I.V.I. In that capacity he passed five months in the military field service, in 1876, in establishing as institution in Dubuque, known as the Northwestern Sanitarium, with a view to afford medical and surgical relief for that class of patients who might not be able to secure proper treatment for local physicians, and to  prevent the necessity of long journeys to more distant hospitals. Dr. Guilbert has been prominently connected with the Masonic Fraternity for over a quarter of a century.  In 1857, he was elected Master of  Dubuque Lodge, No. 3, and was re-elected five or six times; in 1858, being a delegate to the Grand Lodge, he was elected Junior Grand Warden, and was re-elected in 1859; in 1861, he was elected Senior Grand Warden, and, in 1862, was appointed Deputy Grand Master; in October, 1862, he became Acting Grand Master, and, in 1862, was elected Grand Master. He was re-elected for the two following terms, and thus managed the affairs of the Grand Lodge of Iowa for nearly four years. He has served eight years as the High Priest of Dubuque Royal Arch Chapter, seven years as Eminent Commander of Siloam Commandery and also for five years as the "Thrice Illustrious," of Dubuque Council No. 3. His connections with the Grand Chapter began some years ago, and he is now it Grand High Priest. He was the accepted orator before several of the grand bodies named, on the annual conventions. Dr. Guilbert has been a voluminous writer of Masonic literature. His reports on foreign correspondence, and other reports and papers presented to the four grand bodies in Iowa, have been very full and complete to advance the interests of Masonry. He edited and published the Evergreen, at Dubuque, for three years.  There are very few persons who are connected with the Order who have done so much to advance its interests as  Dr. Guilbert.
In 1872, Dr. Guilbert became interested in the Liberal Republican movement.  He was unanimously chosen Permanent Chairman of the first Liberal Republican Convention held in Iowa; was unanimously nominated for Secretary of State on the joint ticket presented by the Liberals and Democrats; was made a candidate for Congress in 1874, and was defeated in convention, by a combination, only by a few votes, after many ballotings. In 1875, he was, despite his disinclination, proposed as a candidate for Governor on the Anti-Monopoly ticket, and, though no present himself, he was complimented with a large vote on the first ballot.  Dr. Guilbert has practiced his profession in Dubuque over twenty-three years, and is one of the leading physicians in the city.  He has been professional lecturer in the homeopathic colleges in Cleveland, St. Louis and Chicago.    pg.797-798
J.W. HAAS,  of the firm Junkermann & Haas, wholesale druggist, 776 Main street; is a native of Germany, and was born in the Kingdom of Wurtemburg, Oct. 19, 1829; he grew up and began learning the drug business when only 14 years of age; he emigrated to America in 1853, and came to Dubuque in 1854, and associated with his present partner, Mr. O. Junkermann and established the firm of Junkermann & Haas, which is the oldest business house in Dubuque without change of firm;  they have successfully engaged in the same business for twenty-five years; they had little when they began, but, by industry and attention to business, they have established a large trade. In 1866, Mr. Haas married Miss Minna Helfferich; she is a native of Germany, and was born in the Kingdom of Wurtemburg.     pg. 798
ADREAN HABLUETZEL, dealer in fresh and salted meats, 281 Julien avenue; was born in Switzerland April 27, 1829; grew up to manhood there, and came to America in 1852; he came to Dubuque in 1854, and began working in butchering shop; his father and grandfather were both in the same business; in 1857, he began business for himself, and has carried on the business over twenty-three years, and is one of the oldest in Dubuque; he sold the first pound of meat that was sold in Central Market; he has a shop on Jackson street. He belongs to the A.O.U.W. In 1857, he married Miss Eliza Voht, a native of Germany; they have eight children-Martin, Lizzie, Adrean, Gertrude, Salomina, Amelia, Emma and Louise.      pg. 798 -799
C. HAFNER,dealer in fresh and salted meats, 1427 Jackson street, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born in the city of Byrne, in 1852; he came to the United States in 1873, and came to Dubuque in 1874; he engaged in business for himself in 1877, and is building up a good trade. He married Miss Lizzie Singer, from the city of Dubuque, Oct. 12, 1877.     pg.799
H. HAHN, dealer in fresh and salted meats,  615 Clay street, and at 95 High street, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born Dec. 29, 1830; he emigrated to the United States in 1852, and came to Dubuque in March, 1857, and worked in butcher business; he has been connected with the business since; is one of the oldest  butchers in the city. He married Miss Christina Keppler from Baden, Germany in 1865; they have five  children- Herman, Albert, Bertha, Minnie, Louise.    pg.799
W.W. HALLER, contractor and builder, Farley; is a native of Harrison Co., Va., and was born Sept. 15, 1826; he grew up to manhood in Illinois and Missouri; he came to Iowa in 1846, and located in Lee co., where he lived three years, and came to Dubuque Co. in 1849, and engaged in farming; he continued farming fifteen years; then engaged in building, and has continued in that business since then, and is now the oldest builder here;  he has held school offices for many years.  In 1849, Mr. Haller was united in marriage to Miss Jane Wilson, a native of Kentucky.    They have six children- Arthusa, John, Campbell, William W., Paulina A. and Ellen.     pg.936
JOSEPH HALTYfarmer, Sec. 27; P.O. Centralia; born in Dubuque Co. March 2, 1848; he is a son of Martin and Lena Halty, mother's maiden name was Lena Sebastian, his parents coming here from Alsace, France in 1847.  The father died in 1878, aged 70 years; the mother is still living, aged about 60 years; the father's family numbered seven children, three of whom are living-Joseph, Mary (now Mrs. Keller) and John; four deceased- Kate, Lena, Tony and Martin.  The home farm of forty acres in carried on by Joseph, the subject of this sketch.  In religion, a Catholic; in politics, a Democrat.    pg.962-963
DEACON JAMES S. HAMILTONfarmer, Sec. 32; P.O. Cascade; his parents were Patrick Hamilton and Elizabeth Smith; he was born Oct. 7, 1805, in Allegheny, Huntingdon Co., Penn.; he stayed at home until 24 years of age, himself and brothers carrying on the farm after the death of his father, which occurred when he was but 16 years old.  He was married in his native town, Oct. 8, 1829, to Miss Mary Walker; they have had nine children, six of whom still live-Sarah E., Jane E. (now dead), William G. (now dead), Mary C., Martha A., Frances E., Abby A., Ida M and Charles W. (now dead); five children are married, and all but Mary C. live in Iowa; Abby A. is yet at home.  In the spring after his marriage, he commenced farming in his native county, which he continued for ten years, and then farmed for five years in Bedford Co., Penn.; in the spring of 1845, came West with his family, and stopped that season twelve miles west of Dubuque; during May and June of that year, they lived in a covered sheep-pes, having neither door nor window, and one daughter was born there; when it rained, the little ones were sheltered under an umbrella, the clapboard roof affording poor protection; they lived mainly on potatoes and johnny-cake; the nearest grist-mill was at Canton, eighteen miles distant, and the nearest physician was at Dubuque.  In the fall of 1845, he settled in Whitewater Township upon the farm which he now owns; his first house here was a log cabin 12 X 12, with a sod roof, and had only a small four-light window; he now has a comfortable house, a large barn and 200 acres of land all in good condition.  He was a liberal contributor to the new railroad enterprise.  In early life, he was a Congregationalist,  but now he and his wife are acceptable members of the Methodist Church. He is not a member of any secret organization; politically, he is a reliable Republican.  He is benevolent and public spirited, and lives peaceably with all mankind.  On the 8th of October, 1879, occurred the golden wedding of this venerable couple; fully fifty of their pioneer friends gathered at the homestead with children and grandchildren on that memorable occasion; the many presents were of both intrinsic and associated value.  The infirmities of age are seen upon the Deacon, but he and his energetic wife are enjoying the rewards of industry and pure living, namely, many friends, a fair competency and clear consciences.    pg.921-922
HAM & CARVER, publishers and proprietors of the Dubuque daily and weekly Herald, official paper of the city and county, corner Sixth and Locust streets, Dubuque.    pg.799
C.M. HAM, of the firm of Ham & Carver, publishers of the Dubuque Herald, Dubuque; is a native of York Co., Me., and was born March 23, 1833; his parents moved to Western New York in 1847; he entered  Union College, Schenectady, and graduated from that institution in 1855; after graduating, he came West to Michigan, where he remained eight years; in 1863, he came to Iowa and located in Dubuque, and became local editor of the Herald; the following year he associated with Mr. Carver, and they bought the Dubuque Herald, and since then they have conducted the paper.  In 1877, Mr. Ham was elected to the State Senate for four years; he is also a member of the Board of Education.    pg.799
MATTHIAS HAM, farmer, Waverly avenue, Eagle Point, Dubuque; is a native of Knox Co., Tenn., and was born April 12, 1805; his parents removed to Missouri  when he was 15 years of age, he lived there and traded on the river, and came to Dubuque (or where the city is now located), in 1827; he was in Illinois and Wisconsin until 1832, when he came to Dubuque for a short time; as soon as the settlers were allowed to come, he came and settled permanently in the spring of 1833, and engaged in mining; he was interested in the first blast-furnace erected in the Snake Diggings, Wis.; he entered the land where  he now lives from the Government, and has lived here on this point thirty-five years; he has been interested in mining most of the time since he came here-also smelting; he laid out Ham's Addition to Dubuque; he owns 150 acres of land neat where he lives; he is one of the earliest settlers of Dubuque, and there are few persons now living here who came to this locality as early as Mr. Ham. In 1837, he married Miss Z. Marklin, a native of Kentucky; she died in February, 1855, leaving five children- Lews Ann, Thomas, Jane, Sarah and Kate; in 1860,  he married Margaret McLean; she died in August, 1874, leaving two children- Mathias and May.    pg.799
AUGUST HAMMEL, of the firm of Wimmer & Hammel, proprietors of the flour and feed mill, 425 White street, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born in the Kingdom of Wurtemburg Dec. 21, 1857; he emigrated to America in 1853, and came to Dubuque in 1854; he learned his business here in the Seventh street mill. When the war broke out, in 1861,  he enlisted in Co. E, 5th I.V.C.; he served during the war; he was twice taken prisoner; the first time he was held only about two weeks; he was again captured with others in McCooks raid during the Atlanta campaign, confined in Andersonville nine months, and suffered almost everything; at the close of the war he was turned loose; after his return, he was in the City Mills twelve years, and, in 1879, engaged in his present business.  He belongs to the Orders of  I.O.O.F. and the United Workmen.  In March, 1866, he married Miss Sarah Wultz, from Wurtemburg, Germany; they have five children- Tillie, Sarah, George, Clara and August.    pg.799-800
G.F. HAMMERAND, wagon manufacturer, Sec. 24; P.O. Sherrill's Mount; born Jan. 3, 1847 in Bavaria; in 1854 he came to Dubuque; remained here till 1864, when he removed to Galena, Ill., and was apprenticed to the wagon business; after working at this trade three years, he returned to Dubuque Co., and settled at his present locality and at once commenced business for himself, which he has since followed; he owns four and a half acres of land with his house and sheds.  Married Margaret Sternwas Dec, 1, 1868; she was born in Ohio in 1846; they have four children- Edward, George, Lizzie and Anna.  Lutheran; Republican.    pg.949
JOHN T. HANCOCK, senior member of the firm of  John T. Hancock & Son, wholesale grocers, Main street; is a native of Lebanon, Ill.; his parents removed to Galena in 1827; in 1829, returned to Belleville, Ill., where they lived until he was 15 years of age, and then removed to Wisconsin; after living in Plattville three years and in Milwaukee four years, he returned to Plattville in 1847 and engaged in business there, continuing until 1855,
when he came to Dubuque; in September, 1858, he established the business which is now carried on under the firm name of John T. Hancock & Son; he was located on Main street, between Second and Third streets, and remained there nine years; the removed to the corner of Main and Fourth streets, and was located there twelve years; then removed to their present location, where they have increased facilities for conducting their large and extensive business; their trade extends through Iowa, Southern Minnesota and Northern Illinois.  Mr. Hancock was united in marriage to Miss Bertha Enz, in this city, Feb. 22, 1849; they have six children; his son, John S. has an interest in the business with his father.     pg. 800
W.J. HANCOCK, Superintendent of the Iowa and Nebraska division of the American Express Co., Dubuque; is a native of Devonshire, England, and was born Oct. 7, 1847; his parents came to the United States during his early boyhood; migrated West to Iowa in 1857, and located in Dubuque; he entered the employ of the Express Company as Messenger boy when only 16 years of age, and has been connected with the Company seventeen years; in 1869, he was appointed agent of the Company at Freeport; in 1875, he was appointed Superintendent of the Iowa and Nebraska division of the Company , and since then  has held that position.  Mr. Hancock was united in marriage, Mary 4, 1869, to Miss Mary E. Stone, of Aurora, Ill.; they have two children- one son, Earle, and one daughter, Bessie.      pg. 800
JOHN P. HANSEN, dealer in wines and liquors, corner Thirteenth and Iowa streets, Dubuque; was born in Luxemburg, Germany, Sept. 17, 1842; came to America in 1854, and came to Dubuque the same year; he grew up to manhood here.  In 1861,  he enlisted in the 5th I.V.C., Co. E, and was all through the war was captured at Newlin, on McCook's raid, and was a prisoner in Andersonville Prison most of the time for seven months; he was sick and so near starved he had to be carried out on a stretcher, and was five months in hospital before he could go out.  After the war, returned to Dubuque, and has been engaged in business for the past ten years.  He married Miss Christina Pappe, a native of Hanover, Germany, Dec. 10, 1867; they have six children- Nicholas, Annie, Matilda, John, Katie, Frank; they lost one son- Peter.     pg. 800
N. HANSEN, of the firm of Hansen & Linehan, wholesale grocers, railroad and steamboat supplies, No. 8 Levee, Dubuque;  is a native of  Luxemburg, Germany, and was born Feb. 24, 1834; he emigrated to America in 1853, and came to Dubuque the same year; in 1856, he became connected as clerk in the same business that he is now engaged in; in 1872, he engaged in business for himself, and has, by industry and close attention to business, built up a large trade; for over twenty years he has not been away from his business twenty-four hours; when he came to this country he only had one fifty-cent piece, and he has kept that ever since; his success is owing to his own efforts. He married Miss Annie Welther, from Luxemburg, Germany, Feb. 20, 1861; they have one daughter-Annie Katie.     pg. 800
FREDERICK HANTELMANNfarmer, Sec. 6; P.O. Sherrill's Mount; born Aug. 7, 1834, in Hanover, Germany; in 1844, he came with his parents to Dubuque Co.; he owns 160 acres of land, also 110 acres in Nebraska; he is Township Trustee, and has been School Director.  He married Susanna Hillanbrand April 4,1857; she was born in Wurtemberg in 1834; they have seven children-John,Daniel,Henry,William,Amelia,Augustus and Susan.  In religion, Mr. H. is a Lutheran.   pg.973,975
HON. THOMAS HARDIE  very long-contact me if you want
WM. A.  HARKETT, proprietor of the Dubuque floral nurseries, corner West Fifth and Hill streets, Dubuque; is a native of  England, and was born in 1848; he grew up to manhood there, and came to the United States in 1870; he came Iowa in 1872, and located in Dubuque and established his present business; Mr. Harkett is a close botanical student, and is one of the very few in this country who make a specialty of making and cultivating new original plants that are standard all over the Union; he has a large experience in this branch of the business; he ships a large part of his plants; he has five greenhouses, substantially built, and heated in the most approved manner; they are the largest and most complete in this section of the State, and hs is building up a good trade.    pg. 800
R.S. HARRIS, capitalist; residence, No. 9, Alpine street; is a native of Delaware Co., N.Y., and was born March 21, 1810; his parents removed to Cincinnati when he was only 5 years of age, where they remained about nine years; they started from there on a flat boat, and came to Galena; arrived there in June, 1824; the only playmates he and his brother had were Indians; he and his brother were called the Harris boys, and were known by that name throughout the Northwest for many years; in 1826, they struck what is called the "Harris Diggins," which have produced an immense amount of ore, and are being worked yet. When 17 years of age, Mr. Harris left home and went on the river and was engaged in steamboating until 1845; he served as engineer, boat builder and commander (the last boat he commanded was the St. Paul); in 1833, he built the Jo Daviess, the first boat built on the river north of St. Louis; he ran the Otter to St. Louis, the first regular packet ever run to that place; the last boat commanded was the St. Paul; there are few steamboat captains now living who recollect so many incidents of the early and great days of steamboating as Mr. Harris; in 1841, while on the river, he was taken with the cholera at Vicksburg; he lay in trance for several days; they thought he was dead and would have buried him if it had not been for his colored servant who nursed him.  Mr. Harris was united in marriage Feb. 28, 1836, to Miss Phebe H. Reeder, of Hamilton Co., Ohio, near Cincinnati; her parents were from Virginia, and were among the earliest settlers of Ohio; after leaving the river, in 1845, he and his brother engaged in trading in boat supplies; they established stores in Galena, Dubuque, St. Louis and St. Paul, and they carried on an extensive trade until 1862, when he retired from business; he and Mrs. Harris went abroad and made  an extended tour in Europe; they came to Dubuque in 1865 and since then have resided here; Mr. Harris has been a stockholder and Director of the First National Bank, of Dubuque, since its organization; when he began life he had nothing, and owes his success to his own efforts.     pg.801
ALEXANDER B. HARRISON, residence, Third street; is a native of Ohio and lived there and in Illinois until coming to Iowa with his mother; they arrived in Dubuque in October, 1833 they  were among the earliest settlers here; he says that he attended the first school that was taught in the State of Iowa, in the early part of the winter of 1833, and George Cubbage was the teacher; Mr. Harrison has been engaged in mining for a great many years; he says he began when he was only large enough to turn a windlass; when he began life he had nothing, and has by his own efforts made and saved a nice competency; Mr. Harrison has an excellent memory, and his recollections of the incidents of early days are very clear and distinct; his sister Miss Melissa E. Harrison, lives with him and keeps house for him; she came to Dubuque with her mother and brothers.  Mrs. Harrison died March 26, 1859, her husband died in Ohio, before the family came west to Dubuque.  Jesse M. Harrison, brother of Alexander, was born in Harrison Co., Ky; he was commissioned and served as Lieutenant in the Black Hawk war; he was also in the army during the rebellion and was commissioned Captain of Co. C., 21st I.V.I  He held the office of Deputy U.S. Marshal during President Taylor's and Polk's administrations, and also held the office of Surveyor of Customs.  The uncle of  Mr. Harrison was the first settler in Harrison Co., Ky.; the county was named after him, and the county seat, Cynthiana, was named after his two daughters.      pg.801
W.E. HARRIMAN, auction and commission merchant, No. 789 Main st. Dubuque; is a native of Danvers, Essex, Mass., and was born in 1830; he grew up to manhood there, and came West to Iowa and located in Dubuque in May, 1855; he taught school for a short time, then engaged in the grocery trade; in 1866, he engaged in the hat, cap and fur trade, and continued in that business for thirteen years; he has held the office of Assistant Assessor of Internal Revenue. Mr. Harriman has been prominently connected with the Order of the I.O.O.F.for a long time and is now Grand Master of  the order in the State of Iowa.  In 1856, Mr. Harriman was united in marriage to Miss Harriet P. Black, a native of Danvers, Essex, Mass., they have three children-Carrie J., Frank B. and Ellen M.    pg.801
JOHN HARTMAN,  foreman of the factory of the Dubuque Furniture and Burial Case Company, corner Eighteenth and Washington streets, Dubuque; is a native of Prussia, and was born March 9, 1817; he grew up to manhood and learned his trade there; he emigrated to America in 1849, and came to St. Louis; he came to Dubuque in 1850, and began working at his trade; he was foreman  in Mr. Herancourt's factory for four years; he engaged in business with Mr. Kley & Huber; they built a factory  which is now occupied by the Furniture and Burial Case Company;  Mr. Hartman is foreman of the manufacturing department; he is also a stockholder and director in the company. In 1851, he married Miss Rachel Fricke, a native of Austria; they have seven children- John, Henry, Ferdinand, Alouis, Louise, Frank and Mary.   pg.801-802
JOHN HARTMAN, dealer in groceries and provisions corner of Seventeenth and West Locust streets, Dubuque; is a native of Dubuque Co., and was born in the city of Dubuque Oct. 11, 1852; he grew up and attended school here; after reaching  manhood,  he engaged in the grocery business in 1877, and is building up a good trade. He married Miss Mary Stoltz, from Buffalo, N.Y., in 1877, they have one daughter,Gertie.   pg.802
JOHN R. HARVEY, house and sign painting and calcimining, 37 Eighth street, Dubuque; is a native of Louisiana, and was born in New Orleans Sept. 4, 1812; he remembers distinctly when his father was brought home wounded in the the battle of New Orleans; in early boyhood his parents died; he went to New Haven, Conn. to school, and afterward, went to Philadelphia, where he learned his trade, and  in 18__ with only $4.62 in his pocket, he started West; he came to St. Louis, and from there came to Dubuque; he walked from Burlington, 220 miles, in five days; he began working at his trade; his first contract was for H.L. Stout, and his next on was painting the court house; he is the oldest established painter in the West; Mr. Harvey has been prominently connected with the Order of the  I.O.O.F., since 1834; passed all the chairs in 1836; was representative to the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania in 1837; he is one of the oldest Past Grands in the State, if not in the country; in 1877, Mr. Harvey gave in the Odd Fellows' Banner of this State, a very full and complete history of the organization of  Harmony Lodge, No. 2 , the first lodge organized in Dubuque; the paper was a very interesting one; Mr. Harvey was clerk of the first election held in Delaware County.    pg.802
REV. FATHER A. HATTENBERGER Pastor of St. Joseph's Convent, Sec. 33; P.O. Dubuque; born in Alsace, France in 1823; educated in the Seminary at Strasbourg, France; came to America in 1847; in 1849, was ordained in Chicago for the diocese of Dubuque; his first work was the pastorate of Fort Des Moines Valley, with residence of Ottumwa; then, for twelve years, in connection with the above work, he  had charge of the church ar Fort Madison, and, after that, at West Point, in Lee Co.; from there, in 1870, he came to his present pastoral work in connection with St. Joseph's Convent, the Mother House of the Sisters of Charity, as its spiritual director and the priest and guide of the church for the surrounding neighborhood.  Father H. is universally beloved by his people for his urbanity of manner, devotion to his work and affection for his church.
EDWARD T. HEALEY,of the firm of Healey Bros., dealers in shelf and builders' hardware, No. 365 Main street, Dubuque; is a native of the city of Dubuque; was born in 1853; he grew up and attended school here; he entered the store of William Chamberlain and remained five years; then entered the house of Westphal, Hinds & Co., and remained seven years; and in 1876 associated with his brother and since then they have carried on their present business.  In June 1876, he was united in marriage to Miss Anna Kilbourn, a native of Bellevue, Jackson Co., Iowa; they have two children, Nathan and Florence.    pg.802
GEORGE W. HEALEY,of the firm of Healey Bros., dealers in shelf and builders' hardware, farming tools and seeds, No. 365 Main street, Dubuque;  is a native of Dubuque Co., and was born in the city of Dubuque Feb. 22, 1842; he grew up and attended school here, and, when 16 years of age, entered the agricultural and seed store of  William Chamberlain; upon the breaking-out of the rebellion, in 186?,  he enlisted in Co.E., 5th I.V.C., and was wounded at Guy's Gap, in the Chattanooga campaign, he was taken prisoner in the Atlanta campaign, and was  confined in Andersonville about two months and exchanged; he was in the service four years; after his return he took his position in the store of Mr. Chamberlain, and remained there until September, 1877, when he engaged in his present business with his brother, succeeding J, & A. Christman, the business being first established by J.P. Farley, and is the pioneer hardware business of Dubuque.  Mr. Healey was united in marriage to Miss Mary Moser, of this city, Oct. 28, 1868; they have three children- Edward M., Mary and Maud.    pg.802
GEORGE C. HEBERLING,  U.S. Marshal; is a native of Harrison Co., Ohio, and was born March 19, 1838; when very young his parents removed to Chambersburg, Penn., and when 12 years of age his parents went to Ohio, and in 1854 they came to Iowa and located in Jackson Co.; after the breaking- out of the rebellion,  he enlisted in 1862, in Co.A., 24th I.V.I.;  he participated in a number of severe battles; he was wounded at Port Gibson, May 1, 1863, and was again wounded during the last month at the battle of Champion Hills; 45 per cent of those who went in that engagement form the 24th Regiment were killed or wounded; after his return from the service, he studied law at Sabula and was admitted to the bar in 1868 and engaged in the practice of law; he was twice elected Representative of the State Legislature and served two term; he held the office of Chairman of the Republican State Central committee, and also held town and school offices; he received the appointment of United States Marshall, March 10, 1875. In the spring of 1862 he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Todd, from Milwaukee, Wis.; they have one son, Dwight; they have lost one don and one daughter, twins.  pg.802-803
JACOB HEDRICK, farmer and gardener, Sec. 35; P.O. Dubuque; born May 1, 1832, in Germany; when a year old, he came with his parents to Pennsylvania in 1836, and thence migrated to Dubuque Co.; owns 120 acres of land.  He married Barbara Esslinger in 1854; she was born in Pennsylvania; they have eight children- Jacob, William, Mary, Louisa, Mena, Emma, George and Emil; Frank was accidentally shot in 1878 (aged 14 years), by his brother George, while playing with fire-arms.   pg.975
A. HEEB,  proprietor of the Dubuque Brewery, Couler avenue, Dubuque;  is a native of Germany, and was born April 11, 1811; he emigrated to America and landed in Baltimore in September, 1835; in 1836, he went to St. Louis; he came to Dubuque in 1846, and the following year, 1847, he came here and  located permanently and engaged in his present business; he has carried on the business over thirty-three years, a greater length of time tan any brewer in the State, and he has built up the largest business in the State. In 1846, Mr. Heeb was united in marriage to Miss Kathrina Gehrig, a native of Germany, they have ten children, five sons and five daughters; Mr. Heeb has held the office of County Supervisor, and was twice elected to the City Council.  pg.803
FRED HEER, architect and superintendent, northwest corner Seventh and Iowa streets, Dubuque; is a native of  Switzerland, and was born July 30, 1834; he grew up to manhood and studied architecture there; he emigrated to America in 1865, and came to Dubuque in 1868, and engaged in his present business as architect and superintendent of erection of buildings; he has built up a large business, and is the architect of many of the best buildings in the city; among them is Levi's Building, the Town Clock building, Zion Church, Lutheran Church, Herald Building, St. Joseph's Academy, Eagle building, Baptist Church and the elegant  residence of Mr. Young, Mr. Levi and many others.  Mr. Heer married Miss Elizabeth Breitler, a native of Switzerland, April 26, 1860; they have three children-Paulina, Fredeline and Elizabeth.  pg.803
REV. FATHER GEORGE W. HEERPastor of St. John's Catholic Church, Centralia; born in Boke, Province of Westphalia, Prussia, April 25, 1849; emigrated to America in 1855 and settled in Fort Madison, Iowa; after some preliminary study, he went to the College of the Franciscan Fathers at Quincy, Ill.; one year was spent in study there, when he was transferred to the Salesianum Seminary, Milwaukee, Wis.; finished his course there after seven years' study and was ordained for the diocese of Dubuque by Bishop Henni, of Michigan, on the 16th of March, 1872; his first work was as Pastor of St. Peters Church, Keokuk, but, after some months of service there, was appointed to Richmond, Washington Co., Iowa, where he remained eighteen months; he was then appointed to his present charge of the church in Centralia and Lattnerville; he is universally beloved by his people, and is, beyond all questions, "the right man in the right place."   pg.963
WILLIAM HEFFNER,  farmer, Sec. 13; P.O. Sherrill's Mount; he was born Nov. 14, 1813 in Wurtemberg, Germany; in 1837 he came to New York, thence to Toledo, Ohio, afterward to Portsmouth, Cincinnati, Kentucky, St. Louis, etc. etc.; in 1843 he came to Wisconsin; in 1846 to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; owns 334 acres of land.  Married Mary Coopmann in 1844; she was born in Germany; they have two children- William and Louis.    pg.949
HENRY HELLMANN, farmer,  Sec.5 ; P.O. New Vienna; he was born in August, 1817, in Germany; in 1834,  he came to Ohio; in 1844,  he came to Dubuque Co., he being one of the first settlers of this locality, there being but three buildings in the township at this time; he owns 200 acres of land , part of which he entered.  Married Agnes Fangman in 1847;  she was born in Germany, and came to Dubuque Co., with her parents in 1844; they have six children- Angeline, Andrew, Mary, Henry, Anna and Elizabeth.  He has been Township Treasurer, School Director, etc.Catholic.     pg.944
HON. STEPHEN HEMPSTEAD, ex-Governor of the State of Iowa; was born at New London, Conn., Oct. 1, 1812, and lived in that State with his parents until the spring of 1828, then removed to St. Louis, Mo., and settled upon a farm a few miles from the city;  in the spring of 1830, he went to Galena, Ill., and was there during the Sac and Fox war, and was an officer in an artillery company, which had been organized for the protection of the place.  After the defeat of Black Hawk and the close of the war, entered as a student of Illinois College at Jacksonville, remaining there about two years; returned to Missouri and commenced the study of law and finished the regular course under Charles S. Hempstead, then a prominent lawyer of Galena; in 1836, he was admitted to practice as an attorney in all the courts of the Territory of Wisconsin, which then embraced the Territory of Iowa, and, the same year located at the town if Dubuque, and was the first lawyer who commenced the practice of his profession in the place; upon the organization of the Territorial government of Iowa in 1838, he was, with Gen. Warner Lewis, elected to represent the northern portion of the Territory in the Legislative Council, which assembled at Burlington during that year, and was Chairman of the Committee on Judiciary, one of the most important committees in the Council; at the second session of that body, was elected President thereof; was again elected a member of the Council in 1845, which was held in Iowa City, and was again chosen President of the same.  In 1844, he was elected one of the delegates of Dubuque County to the first convention to frame a constitution for the State of Iowa, and was Chairman of the Committee on Incorporation's; in 1848, he was, with Judge Charles Mason and W. G. Woodward, appointed Commissioner by the Legislature to revise the laws of the State of Iowa, and which revision, with a few amendments, was adopted as the code of Iowa of 1851; in 1850, he was elected  Governor of the State of Iowa and served in that position for four years, being the full term under the then Constitution, and was the second Governor of the State; in 1855, he was elected County  Judge of Dubuque County, and held that office for about twelve years; under his administration, were erected the principal county buildings, the jail, poorhouse and some valuable bridges; his health being very much impaired, he has retired from public life to enjoy quietude and repose.  pg.803-804
COL. D. B. HENDERSON,attorney at law, of the firm of Shiras, Van Duzee & Henderson, corner Main and Fifth streets;  is a native of Scotland, and was born March 14, 1840; his parents came to America when he was 6 years of age, and located in Illinois, near Rockford; in the spring of 1852, they removed to Fayette County, Iowa, where the family bought a large tract of land, which is known as "Henderson Prairie;" he attended the common schools, and then entered the Upper Iowa University, where he remained until  the breaking out of the rebellion, when he enlisted as private in September, 1861, and was elected First Lieutenant of Co. C., 12th I.V.I  he participated in the battles of Fort Henry and Donelson, Shiloh and Corinth; he was wounded in the charge on Fort Donelson, and also at Corinth, where he lost his leg; he was Adjutant of the Union Brigade; he was discharged, and was afterward, commissioned Colonel of the 46th I.V.I He served as Commissioner of the Board of Enrollment of the Third District Iowa; he studied law with Bissell & Shiras and was admitted to the bar in 1865, and, during the same year, was appointed Collector of Internal Revenue for the Third District of Iowa and served until June 30, 1869, when he resigned that office to become a member of the law firm of Shiras, Van Duzee & Henderson, a vacancy having occurred by the death of Attorney General Bissell; he was Assistant United States District Attorney for the Northern District of Iowa for two years, which position he also resigned in order to give his whole attention to the practice of his profession. Col. Henderson was united in marriage to Miss Augusta A. Fox, a native of Ohio, March 4,1866; they have three children-Angie,Belle and Don A.   pg.804
REV. FATHER JOHN P. HENNESSY Cascade, son of James Hennessy and Winnifred Gleesan; was born June 28, 1847, in the County of Tipperary, and in the archdiocese of Cashel and Emly, Ireland; until 15 years of age, he was with his parents, who were farmers, and at that age he began a preparatory course for college at the Jesuits' Seminary in Limerick; at the age of 19, he entered his diocesan college ar Thurles; he spent eight years in this college, taking the full classical and theological course; he came to Dubuque Oct. 8, 1874, and his first appointment was in Allamakee Co., Iowa, where he remained but a year, and his second charge was that of St. Martin's Church at Cascade, where he has since remained; his pastorate includes fully 150 families; the St. Martin's congregation have a parochial school with an enrollment of nearly one hundred children, taught by six Sisters of the B.V.M.; it was established in 1869, and is provided with a spacious, three-story brick building; the church was erected in 1867, and is of stones, neat, commodious and within is richly ornamented, and will seat 600; they  have a comfortable brick parsonage adjoining the church.  Father Henry, during his pastorate, has secured a sweet toned bell, weighing nearly a ton, and has made other substantial improvements.  He is not identified with any political party, and does not interfere with, or in any way dictate to, his congregation in regard to their political action.  The pleasantest relations exists between him and his people, and the general public.   pg.912
LOUIS HENNEY, farmer and gardener, Sec. 35; P.O. Dubuque; born Oct. 27, 1855, in Eagle Point, Iowa, and has always lived in Dubuque Co.; he owns forty acres of land, which he devotes to gardening purposes; his father was born in Germany in 1818, and died on this farm in 1868; his mother was born in 1825, in Germany, and died here in 1879; his two sisters- Emma and Minnie- live here with him.   pg.975
FREDERICK HENNIGES,   farmer, Sec. 20; P.O. Dubuque; born Feb. 17, 1839, in Hanover; in 1853, he came to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he owns 295 acres of land; he is Township Trustee, and has been School Director.  He married Mena Kemp in 1866; she was born in Dubuque Co.; they have three children- Emma, Frederick and Henry. In religion, he is a Lutheran.    pg.963
PETER HENTGES, farmer, Sec. 31; P.O. Pin Oak; born Oct. 10, 1819, in Prussia; in 1847, he came to Chicago, thence to Du Page Co., Ill.; in 1855, he came to his present farm, consisting of 253 acres of land; his residence and other buildings are equal to any in the township, all of which he has built since coming here,  He has been three years Township Treasurer.  Married Mary Schmidt in 1851; she was born in Prussia; they have six children, four sons and two daughters.  Catholic.     pg.958
V. HERANCOURT, (deceased) was a native of Germany; and was born in Bavaria Jan 8, 1821; he emigrated to the United States in 1837, and came to Ohio where he lived for some years.  In 1846, he was united in marriage to Miss Catharine Gratz, a native of Bavaria, Germany.  Mr. Herancourt came to Dubuque in 1845, and the following year, he located here permanently and engaged in the furniture business, he was one of the earliest furniture dealer in Dubuque, continuing in this business until his death, which occurred March 17, 1867; he left four children- Mary A., now Mrs. O.S. Langworthy), William V., Henry, John H.; they lost two children, Katharine, the oldest, and Amelia, the fifth child. Mr. Herancourt left a nice property and, since his death, Mrs. Herancourt, with her sons, has successfully carried on the manufacture and sale of furniture in this city; the family still reside on the homestead, occupying large grounds south of Julien avenue.   pg.804
PETER  HERBER, farmer, Sec. 27; P.O. Sherrill's Mount; born July 25, 1835, in Prussia; in 1854, he came to Chicago, and, in 1856, he migrated to Dubuque Co.; he owns eighty acres of land; he is Township Assessor, Township Trustee, and Treasurer of the School Board.  He married Mary Reinert in 1865; she was born in Prussia; they have five children-Katie, John, Mary, Michael and Frank; the latter enlisted, in 1862, in Co. E, 21st I.V.I., and served to the end of the war.  Mr. H. is a Catholic in religion, and a Democrat in politics.   pg.975
JOSEPH HEROD, real estate office, Globe Building, Main street, Dubuque; is a native of England; he came to Iowa and located in Dubuque, in 1852; he was actively and officially identified with various railroad enterprises; he was officially connected with school interests in Julian Township for nearly twenty years; he holds the office of School Treasurer of Dubuque, and was elected in 1875; he is also a member of the City Council, being elected to that office in 1878.   pg.804
JOHN HESS,proprietor of the Dubuque Show-case Factory, manufactures of all kinds of show cases, No. 640 Main street, Dubuque; is a native of Wurtemburg, Germany and was born March 13, 1832; he emigrated to the United States in September, 1850, and lived in the city of New York five years; he came to Chicago in 1855, and carried on business there nineteen, and was burned out, on State street in the largefire of 1874; he came to Dubuque in 1874, and established his business here; he is building up a good trade, which extends into Iowa, Nebraska, Dakota and Colorado.  In 1878, he was united in marriage to Mrs. Magdalena Bieg, from Wurtemburg, Germany.   pg.804
HENRY S. HETHERINGTON, Secretary of the Dubuque Building and Loan Association, corner Main and Fourth streets; is a native of Dauphin Co., Penn., and was born Feb. 9, 1820; he grew up to manhood there and learned the trade of mason and bricklayer;  he came West to the Territory of Iowa in 1843 and came to Dubuque in 1845, and began working at his trade. he was engaged in contracting and building until 1853, then entered the office of the Surveyor General and remained there five years, in the spring of 1858, he was elected Mayor of Dubuque, served one term and then engaged in farming; he was afterward in the grain and produce business four years; was a member of the firm of Carr, Austin & Co., in the planing-mill business two years, and engaged in packing pork for six years; in 1879, he was elected Secretary of the Dubuque Building and Loan Association, and has the management of the business of the Company; he is also Secretary of the Fair Association. In 1844, married Miss Sarah A. Hill, a native of Pennsylvania; she died in 1866, leaving one son-James H., now in the United States Navy; in 1869, Mr. Hetherington married Maria A. Soule, from Lyons, Iowa; she died in 1878, leaving one daughter-Clara.    pg.811
R.S. HIBBARD, passenger conductor on the Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota Railroad; is a native of Vermont, and was born in 1846; he grew up and attended school there. After the war broke out, he enlisted Aug. 23, 1862, when only 17 years of age, in the 16th Vt. V.I. In 1860, he came West and began railroading in 1869; in 1872, he became connected with the C.,C.,D.& M. Road, and has since ran a train on this road. In 1866, he was united in marriage to Miss Marion Dodge, a native Vermont; they have two children- George and Lulu.  pg.804-805
JOHN HIGGS, farmer, Sec. 31; P.O. Farley; born  in England June 1, 1825; came to America in 1851; remained one year in Pennsylvania,  removing to Dubuque Co. in 1852; has a farm of 80 acres;  is a member of the Republican party; has held township offices, and is held in universal esteem by all who know him; his wife was Miss Elizabeth Sobey, a native of England. They were married in 1851; eight children are living- Lucy (now Mrs. Ogan), Nannie, Bettie, Kittie, Joseph, John, Amanda and Edith; three are dead-Joseph, Richard and Sophia.     pg.936
PROF. JANUARIUS HIGI, Principal of St. Mary's Parochial School, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born Sept. 17, 1828; he grew up to manhood and received his literary and musical education there; he engaged in teaching and continued for eight years; he emigrated to America in 1854; came to St. Louis and engaged in teaching; he also taught in Springfield, Ill., and at Peoria, Fort Wayne and Detroit; he came to Dubuque in 1871, and, since then, has occupied his present position; he holds the position of organist in St. Mary's Church. In  May, 1860, Prof. Higi was united in marriage to Miss Frances Mathias, a native of Germany; they have eight children- one son and seven daughters.     pg.805
JAMES HILL, farmer, Sec. 29; P.O. Farley; born in Ireland in 1835; came to Dubuque Co. in 1837; has been   engaged in farming, as a vocation, for all the years since old enough to transact business; has a good farm of 80 acres, in a fine community; is connected with the Catholic Church, and identified with the Democratic party. He has been married twice; his first wife was Bridget O'Connor, a native of Ireland; they were married in 1876; she died, 1877; his second wife was Annie Dowd, also born in Ireland; married, 1877; two children-Rosana and Jennie.     pg.936
REV. JAMES HILLretired Baptist minister, of Cascade; is the son of Wm. Hill and Sophia Hawkins, and was born on the 6th of December, 1822, in Cheddar, Somersetshire, England; he was apprentice until 21 years of age, to the draper and general store business.  After attaining his majority, he was an assistant in a mercantile establishment in Bristol, England, until 1849, when he came to America and settled in Dubuque, where he remained until 1854, when he located in Cascade, which has since been his home.  He was married in Cheddar, England, in July, 1848, to Miss Sylvia Brown, daughter of James Brown, of Nicholston, Devonshire, England.  On his arrival in Cascade, he purchased and began improving a quarter-section of land where his homestead now is, and at the same time preached to people in the region round about his settlement; most of his minisrty have been without money or price.  Through his efforts, the Baptist Churches at Epworth and Worthington were gathered, organized and supplied with places of worship; he was also a liberal contributor to Cascade churches. In 1862, he raised seventy-two men for a company of volunteers, and Capt. David Graves completed the company, and it was enlisted in the 21st, I.V.I.; he was elected First Lieutenant, and served in that position until just after the fall of Vicksburg, when he was called to the chaplaincy of the regiment by the unanimous choice of privates and officers; before the close of the war , he was well known in that division as the "Fighting Chaplain;" he preached several times every week, and religious revival were not unfrequented in his regiment.  On his return at the close of the war, he resumed his missionary labors in this vicinity.  In 1857, he built a fine brick residence in the suburbs of Cascade; it is situated upon a commanding eminence, and his attractive grounds give evidence of cultivated taste.  His wife was his efficient co-laborer until her death in March 1874; from 1872 to 1877, he was Pastor of the Baptist Church at Cascade; has now a regular appointment at Worthington, but still resides on and superintends his farm,  The plain east of his dwelling was an ancient Indian burying ground; relics have been frequently found, and a full length skeleton of an adult Indian was exhumed not long ago.  This vicinity was a favorite camping place of the roving tribes, and until within a score of years, some made annual pilgrimages to these hunting-grounds and resting -place of their departed heroes.  In 1878, Mr. Hill was made a Director of the Chicago, Bellevue, Cascade & Western Narrow-Gauge Railroad, and was then elected Vice President, and early in 1879 was the President, but afterward resigned in favor of OF. Wyatt, who, in connection with J.F. Joy and George Runkel, are now constructing the road; he was for one year connected with the Cascade flouring-mills.  In September, 1874, he married Mrs. Angie Potter, daughter of John V. McCune, of Belle Plain, Benton Co., Iowa; he has no children.   He has been a conscientious and active Republican from the earliest existence of the party, and during his entire life has been an enemy of oppression and slavery of either black or white, and early prophesied that the rebellion would be the death of American slavery.  His friend nominated him for the Legislature from this stronghold of Democracy, and he ran 700 ahead of his ticket, but, of course, failed of an election.  He is candid and benevolent, and well known for his unostentatious deed of charity.  His wife ably seconds his labors,  He is emphatically a self-made man; his culture, literary and theological, is the result of devoted study at home in connection with his daily labors.  He is not bigoted in his views on religious, social or general questions which divide mankind, but acts in the spirit of Chalmer's beautiful sentiment: "In essentials, unity; in non-essential, liberty; in all things, charity."    pg.912-913
R.L. HILL, homeopathic physician, 855 Locust street, Dubuque;  is a native of Niagara Falls, Canada, and was  born July 19, 1842; he grew up to manhood mostly in Wisconsin and Illinois; he studied medicine and graduated for Rush Medial College, Chicago in 1864; he afterward, in 1867, had the honorary degree conferred on him by the Hahnemann Medical College, Chicago; he came to Iowa and settled permanently in Dubuque Feb. 1, 1864, and engaged in the practice of medicine, and has, since then, successfully practiced his profession here; he was one of the originators of the Western Academy of Medicine, and holds the office of Vice President.    pg.805
JOHN HINDE, farmer, Secs. 28 and 29; P.O. Epworth; born  in the village of Ince, near Chester, Cheshire Co., England, in 1843; his ancestry of the Hinde family have lived in the above village for many past generations; he came to America and to Dubuque Co. in 1853; lived in Jefferson Township nineteen years, removing to his present location in 1872; has a  farm of 120 acres under good cultivation. He is a member of the
M.E. Church and of the Republican party; has held school offices, and invariably acts well his part in aiding all worthy enterprises in his community. He was married Nov. 16, 1871,a worthy lady-Miss Louise V. Crosley, daughter of William Crosley, of Center Township, who moved to Dubuque Co. from Virginia, in September, 1856; they have five children living- Mary L., John William, Hannah Elizabeth, Thomas Joseph, Richard Henry; and one daughter died in infancy.  Mr. Hind's father, Thomas, his two brothers, Richard and Thomas, his cousin, Robert, and a more distant relative, Richard, are all residents of Jefferson Township, so that the long-time family associations of England are in great measure transferred to this portion of the New World.
JOSEPH HINKLEY, livery and sale stable, Dyersville;born Dec.18, 1843, Northamptonshire, England;  came to Dyersville in 1855; in 1855 he went to Colorado,California and other Western States, and, in 1870, returned to Dyersville. Has held the office of Marshal and Constable the past five years. Married Susanna Northey,
July 4, 1871; she was born in England;  have two children-Herbert G. and Hanney H.    pg.944
ALFRED HOBBS, Deputy Clerk of the United States District Court and United States Commissioner, Dubuque;   is a native of London, England, and was born Jan. 7, 1840; he grew up and received his education there; he came to America in 1867, and came to Dubuque the same year. In March, 1868, he entered the office of the Clerk of the U.S. District Court as Deputy, has held that position for the past twelve years.  Mr. Hobbs was united in marriage, De. 30, 1879, to Miss Josephine Whisler, from Davenport, Iowa.    pg.805
HON. JOHN HODGDON, attorney at law, office corner Main and Seventh streets; is a native of  New Hampshire, and was born in Weare, Hillsboro Co., Oct. 8,  1800; he grew up and attended school there, and prepared for college at Exeter  Academy.  He entered Bowdoin College, and graduated from that institution in 1827. He studied law with Allan Gilman, of Bangor, Me., and was admitted to the bar and practiced law there.  In 1838, he was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Amelia Legget, a native of New York.  In 1843, he went to Holton, Me., to settle two townships of  land, one of which was given him by his grandfather, and one he bought; he remained there ten years. He came West to Iowa, and located at Dubuque Nov. 1, 1853; he engaged in buying and selling lands. In 1859, he again resumed the practice of his profession; since then he has given his attention to real estate and law.  While living in Maine, Gen. Hodgdon was prominently connected with official life. In 1847, he was elected to the State Senate, and served two terms, and was chosen presiding office of that body. When only 33 years of age,  he was elected President of the Mercantile Bank of Bangor, Me. He was a member of the Governor's Council in 1833. He held the office of Bank Commissioner and Bank Examiner six years, and also held the office of State Land Agent four years. He was appointed by President Polk Commissioner, on the part of the State of Maine, to confer with George W. Coffin on the part  of the State of Massachusetts, to settle and distribute the disputed Territory Fund.  He was a member of the first Presidential Convention ever held in the United States; it was held at Baltimore, May 22, 1832.  Gen. Hodgdon has from early manhood been extensively engaged in dealing in lands, and is now a large property owner.  There are very few men now living who have been so actively engaged in active business life during the present century.    pg.805
O.F. HODGE, proprietor of the American Smelting Company, smelters and manufacturers of solders, Babbit metal brass castings, corner of Clay and Ninth streets, Dubuque; is a native of Monroe Co., N.Y., and was born  in the the city of Rochester; he grew up and learned the machinist's trade there. He came West in 1859, and came to Dubuque  in 1863, and  worked at his trade with Rouse & Williams, and, afterward worked in the shops of the Dubuque and Sioux City R.R. Co. He went to St. Louis and worked in the railroad shops of the railroad company.
In 1869, he engaged in business, the firm being Hodge & Whitelaw; they continued together six years, and _ Brass Foundry until the present year, when it became the American Smelting Company, bought his partner's interest, and continued the business under the name of  Dubuque, establishing a new branch of business here manufacturing metals. Mr. Hodge has a large experience, and is building up a successful business, and is the only maker of metals north of St. Louis, and his trade extends from St. Paul to St. Louis. When Mr. Hodge came to Dubuque he did now have a dollar, and his success is owing entirely to his own efforts.  In 1864, he married Miss Amelia Woodhouse, a native of Manchester, England; they have had six children; only three survive. pg.805-806
ADAM J. HOEFER firm of Hoefer & Ramm, proprietors Washington House,  New Vienna; born Aug. 7, 1856, in New Wine Township;at the age of 17, he went to Milwaukee and attended the Pio Nono College two years; then  returned and was engaged in teaching school till 1880, when he commenced his present business.  He  married Josephine Kokenege, Nov. 25, 1879; she was born in Cincinnati, Ohio. His parents came to Dubuque Co., in 1860.  His partner, Christian Ramm, was born in Nassau, Germany, May 8, 1852; in 1837, he came to Dubuque Co., and engaged in farming till he commenced his present business.  His parents reside in  Iowa Township.    pg.944
ANDREW HOERNER, Justice of the Peace, corner Seventh and Main streets, Dubuque; was born in Baden, Germany, Nov. 19, 1824; he emigrated to America in 1847, and came to Dubuque in March of the same year. He engaged in mining for some years, then engaged in building about ten years. During the war, he enlisted in the 46th I.V.I., and was commissioned Lieutenant in Company A. He has held  office of Marketmaster for four years, and was elected Justice of the Peace in 1874. He married Mary Conzett, a native of Switzerland, Dec. 19, 1849; they have five children- George A., Mary, David, Johnnie, Emma.     pg.806
HENRY HOFFMAN,dealer in wines and liquors, 1504 Clay street; is a native of Germany,  and was born Aug. 25, 1844; he came to America in 1870, and came to Dubuque in 1872. He engaged in his present business in 1875. In 1873, he was united in marriage to Miss Katie Scharf, a native of Dubuque.     pg.806
FREDERICK HOHLSTEIN, farmer, Sec. 24; P.O. Sherrill's Mount; born on July 31, 1819 in Germany; in 1835; he went to Texas; in 1836, he came to Jefferson Township, where he has since lived: he first mad a claim of 320 acres, now owns eighty-six acres; has been eight years School Director.  Married Catherine Tishauser in 1862 she was born in Germany; have four children- Fred, Emma, Caroline and Mary; he has five children by former marriage- Mary, William, Rosena, Louisa and John.    pg.949
H.S. HOLBROOK, agent of the American Express Co., Dubuque; is a native of Seymour, New Haven Co., Conn., and was born Sept. 5, 1848; his parents came West to Iowa in 1856, and he grew up to manhood in this State. He has been connected with the Express Co., since 1866; he was agent for the company at Charles City, and at Sioux City four years, and was appointed to his present position April 15, 1879. Mr. Holbrook was united in marriage, June 17, 1874, to Miss Lunette H. Kelly, from Charles City, Iowa; they have on daughter- Edith.     pg.806
ORA HOLLAND, contractor and builder, Julien avenue, Dubuque; is a native of  Windham Co. Vt., and was born Aug. 25, 1825; he grew up there until 17 years of age; then came West, and arrived in Chicago in July, 1843. He went to Jacksonville, Ill, and learned the trade of carpenter and joiner, and remained there three years, and came to Dubuque; arrived here March 30, 1846, and began working at his trade at ten shillings a day; he afterward engaged in building, and since then has continued in the business; he has built up a large business, and has built many of the best buildings in the city. He has been engaged in building and contracting for over thirty-three years- a greater length of time than any builder in Dubuque. He had only a very little when he began, and now he has a nice property;  his success in life is owing to his own efforts.  He belongs to the fraternity of the Odd Fellows. He was united in marriage in this city, March 30, 1852, to Miss Selina Smith, a native of New York State; they have had six children; only three of whom survive- Emma May, Frank H., John A.     pg.806
CHARLES HOLLNAGEL, cooper, and dealer in groceries and provisions, 2294 Couler avenue, Dubuque;
is a native of Germany, and was born April 14, 1835;  he came to the United States in December, 1860, and came to Dubuque January 1,  1861; the first winter he cut wood, and ran on a flatboat during the summer; in 1865, he engaged in the coopering business, and has built up a good trade; he engaged in the grocery and provisions business in 1878; he had nothing when he began, and what he owns he has made by his own efforts; he belongs to the I.O.O.F. and to the United Workmen. He married Miss Frederika Sass, a native      pg.806  THATS ALL I HAVE
HENRY HOLSCHER, of the firm Holscher Bros, general merchandise, grain, pork, etc., Dyersville; was born Feb. 23, 1832, in Westphalia, Prussia; in 1856  he came to Baltimore, Md., thence to Wisconsin, and there engaged in railroading for about six months; Jan 3, 1857, he came to Dyersville, having to borrow $10 to pay his expenses here; he then opened a small store and gradually increased his stock as his means would admit, and now carries on an immense business, and is now probably the wealthiest man in this locality; he has just been elected Mayor, and has held several other local offices.  Married  Catharine Schultz, Nov. 20, 1860; she was born  Prussia;  they have nine children - three sons and six daughters. Democrat; Roman Catholic .    pg.944
C. HOLTZ, merchant tailor, No. 781 Main street, Dubuque; was born in Prussia Oct. 2, 1824; he grew up to manhood and learned his trade there; he emigrated to America in 1857, and came to Dubuque the same year; he returned to Europe and remained four years, and, in 1865, came again to Dubuque, and, in 1866 he engaged in his present business, and has carried it on since then. He married  Miss Henrietti Arnold, a native of Saxony, Sept. 1, 1865;  they have two sons-Henry and Ernest.     pg. 811
WILLIAM HOPKINS, of the firm of Rouse, Dean & Co., proprietor of the  Iowa Iron Works;  is a native of Scotland, and was born Feb. 1, 1840; he grew up and  learned the trade of iron shipbuilding and boiler-making, on the Clyde. During our war, he was engaged to come to the  United States by Harrison Loring the shipbuilder, of Boston, to to build monitors for the Government; remained in Boston until the close of the war; in 1867, he came  to Dubuque and was master mechanic of the boiler shops of the Dubuque & Sioux City Railroad, until the road passed into the control of the Illinois Central Railroad, and since then he has been connected with the Iowa Iron Works; they constructed the Clyde, the first iron steamer on the Mississippi River.  Mr. Hopkins married Miss Jane Kinnison, a native of the city of Glasgow, Scotland;  they have one daughter-Jane.  pg.812
PROF. FRED A. HOPPE, Director of the Iowa Conservatory of Music, No. 968 Locust, street, Dubuque; is a native of Prussia Germany, and was born at Burscheidt, near Cologne, March 3, 1836; he began the study of music when only 7 years of age; came to the United States in 1849, and completed his musical studies in St. Louis; he taught music there until 1858, when he came to Galena, where he taught music until 1863, when he organized a band from Galena and  Dubuque for Gen. Maltby's brigade, and was stationed at Vicksburg, and remained in the service until the end of the war. After his return, he removed to Dubuque, and engaged in teaching music, and established the Iowa Conservatory of Music; he was elected leader of the old German Band, which was afterward consolidated with the Great Western Band; he was elected its leader, and still occupies that position; he held the position of organist at St. Mary's Catholic Church three years, and, since 1874, he has held the same position in the Second Presbyterian Church in this city.  In 1857, he was united in marriage to Miss Laura Hager, from St. Louis; they have six children- Clara (engaged in teaching music), Freddie, Laura, Willie, John and Ella.     pg. 811-812
ASA HORR, physician and surgeon, 872 Main  street; is a native of Ohio, and was born Sept. 2, 1817; his parents were Isaac Horr and Nancy Smith Horr, both of New England stock.  The father of Asa was an early settler in the Black River country, in New York, and opened a farm there prior to emigrating to Ohio; in the latter State he engaged in mercantile business, and afterward returned to New York in 1827, and died in Watertown, Jefferson Co., soon afterward. Up to the time his father died, Asa was kept at school most of the time, but now was put on a farm, and, for several years, attended schools only during the winter season; at the age of 20, he returned to his native town in Ohio and read medicine with a cousin; he attended lectures at two colleges in that State, and graduated from both; after leaving the Cleveland College, he practiced six years in Ohio and one in Illinois, and, in 1847, made a permanent settlement in Dubuque, Iowa; not content with a mastery of the science of medicine, in which he has given no inconsiderable attention to the investigation of sciences collateral to medicine, quite early in life, he studied botany with a good degree of success, and for more than twenty years was one of the leading observers for the Smithsonian Institution; he was influential in originating, and prominent in building up, the Iowa Institute of Science and Arts in Dubuque, and has been its President for the last eight or nine years; he is a man of decidedly scientific tastes and of high attainments. Dr. Horr is a member of the Iowa State Medical Society, of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, of the American Public Health Association, and of several scientific societies in the Upper Mississippi Valley; he is identified with many  important interests in Dubuque.  Its town clock was procured mainly through his exertions; the clock and the regulation of time have been since then entirely under supervision; and the true longitude of the city was established through him ten of twelve years ago, by the aid of his fine astronomical transit. Dr. Horr is one of the leading surgeons in Northern Iowa, and neither his practice nor his  reputation in this line is limited to any one State.  He was Post Surgeon at Dubuque in the early part of the late war and Examining Surgeon for recruits in the regular army. He has been a member of the Masonic Order since 1856. In politics, he was a Whig until the extinction of that party, since which time he has been a Republican; till middle life his religious views were orthodox; they are now liberal.  He married Miss Eliza Sherman in 1841; she died in 1866.  He married Mrs. EmmaF. Webber in 1868; she died in 1879; he has three children, all by his first wife.  His eldest child, Augusta S., is the wife of Henry Hackbusch, a civil engineer and surveyor at Leavenworth, Kan.; Edward W. is a leading merchant in Blandville, Ky., and the youngest child, May, lives at home.   pg.812
MAJ. JOSEPH L. HORR, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 22; P.O. Dubuque; is a native of Ontario, Canada West, and was born in Dundas April 13, 1838; he came to Dubuque in August, 1852, and grew up to manhood here. When the war broke out, he enlisted in the regular service in the 13th Regt., U.S. Inf., Gen. Sherman's old regiment; after serving one year, he was promoted to Second Lieutenant, and after promoted to First Lieutenant, and in 1867, was again promoted and commissioned Captain; he was wounded at Vicksburg; was struck six times in the engagement May 19, 1863l he carries two bullets in his body yet; he served until the close of the war, and was then ordered on the frontier, and was in the Indian service.  Maj. Horr was united in marriage, May 24, 1870, to Miss Elizabeth R. Ogilby, daughter of the late Joseph Ogilby, of the city of Dubuque.  In December, 1870, Maj. Horr resigned his commission and returned to Dubuque, and since then has been engaged in stock-raising, and is interested in mining.  Maj. Horr has a small farm well stocked with fruit, finely located, just outside of the city limits; he also owns a farm of 225 acres at Sand Springs, Delaware Co.; Maj. and Mrs. Horr have one son, Read, and two daughters- Bessie and Irene.   pg.812-813
A.W. HOSFORD, proprietor South Dubuque Mills; residence 596 Union street, West's Hill; born in Oberlin, Ohio, June 14, 1839; he came to Dubuque Co. in 1855; engaged in farming until 1857, when he returned to Oberlin and attended college for two years, returning to Dubuque Co. in 1859; was employed in teaching until the breaking out of the civil war in 1861. He then enlisted as a private in Co. G, 1st I.VC.; at different times, by virtue of regular and merited promotions, he filled all the offices of his company, commanding the company during the last two years of service, and was mustered out with his command March 17, 1866.  Soon after the war, he was married to Miss Sidonia Waller, of Rockdale, and for the next seven years devoted his attention to farming; he then sold out his farm and took a trip to Europe with his family; remained there a year, returning in 1874; in 1875, he bought an interest in the Rockdale (now South Dubuque) Mills, and has been one of its proprietors ever since.  Religion, Methodist; politics, Republican; four children living- Amanda Lorena, Richard Waller, Ida Florence (born in England) and Minnie Alberta; two deceased- Albert William and Mary Etta.
pg.813
J.B. HOWARD, Superintendent of the Dubuque City Gas Works, Dubuque; is a native of the north part of Ireland,  and was born at Carrick Fergus March 17, 1830; his parents came to America when he was only and few months old, and he grew up to manhood and received his education in the city of New York, and lived there until 1856, when he came West to Iowa and located in Dubuque, and engaged in gas fitting and plumbing. When the war broke out, in 1861, he enlisted in the first call for troops; he was a member of the Governor's Grays, which went out as Co. I., 1st I.V.I.;  he was Sergeant of the company, and was in the battle of Wilson's Creek; he afterward, enlisted in the 44th  I.V.I., and was commissioned First Lieutenant of Co. A. Mr. Howard and Mr. McArthur leased the City Gas Works, and had charge of them for twelve years, and since then Mr. Howard has been Superintendent of the Gas Works; soon after coming here, Mr. Howard was chosen Chief of the Fire Department, and served in that position three years; he has served as City Alderman, and as Director and Vice President of the Building & Loan Association, and is Director of Dubuque County Agricultural Fair Association.  In July 1850, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Mercoun, a native of the city of Brooklyn, N.Y.; her father and her grandfather were both born in Brooklyn; Mr. and Mrs. Howard have five children- William (in California), Emma (now Mrs. E.P. Graves), Eliza (now Mrs. George W. Conway), Fannie and Jeremiah.    pg.813
JAMES HOWIE, carpenter and builder, and builder of Birdsall Refrigerator Building, north side of Fifth street, between Main and Iowa streets, Dubuque; is a native of Aberdeenshire, Scotland, and was born Aug. 3, 1841;  he grew up to manhood there, and, in 1861, went to London and lived there until 1869, when he emigrated to America and came direct to Dubuque, and engaged in building, employing, at times, from ten to fifteen men; he did all the carpenter work for the large works of the Norwegian Plow Company, Waller Building, and many others. In September, 1861, he was united in marriage to Miss Roseina Hull,a native of the city of London; she died in January, 1874, leaving three children- James R., David T. and Rosie. In 1876, he was united in marriage to Miss Matilda J. Alexander,a native of this county;  they have two children, twins- Addie and Olive. Mr. Howie  is a consistent member of the Christian Church, and is actively identified with the Young Men's Christian Association.   pg.813-814
HENRY HUBER, Director in the Dubuque Furniture and Burial-Case Company, factory corner of Eighteenth and Washington streets, Dubuque;  is a native of Hess-Darmstadt, Germany, and was born Sept. 27, 1824; he grew up to manhood and learned his trade there; he is what is called a "forty-eight man,"being a soldier, and fought for the monarchy, and he was awarded two badges of honor; he emigrated to America in 1851, and lived in New York and New Jersey three years and came to Dubuque in 1854, and began working at his trade;  afterward, engaged in business for himself; he and Mr. Kley and Huber built the factory now occupied by this company, and were in business some years. Mr. Huber has been a Director in the Dubuque Furniture and Burial-Case Co. since its organization. He married  Miss Christina Eichhorn, from Hess-Darmstadt, Germany, in 1850; they have five children- Christina, Frank, Joseph, Paulina and Annie, and have lost two.     pg.814
M.A. HUBERT, wholesale and retail dealer in hats, caps and furs, Main street; was born in Baden, Germany, Nov. 9, 1822; he grew up to manhood there, and learned the business of furrier; he emigrated to America in 1848, came to Galena and lived there five years, and one year in St. Louis, and came to Dubuque in February, 1854, and engaged in the business of hats, caps and fancy goods, and, soon after, added a fur department to his business;  he is the oldest dealer in furs in the city of Dubuque and has built up a large trade, both wholesale and retail. Mr. Hubert has been successfully engaged in business here for over twenty-five years.  In 1854, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Niefineker, a native of Switzerland; they have six children- John, Louise, Ed., Arthur, Freddie and Gussie.   pg.814
JOSEPH HUG, teaming, No. 35 West Seventh Street Hill, Dubuque; was born in Switzerland  Feb. 23, 1823; he emigrated to America in 1845, and came the same year, to Dubuque and began work on the Julian House; during the Mexican war, in 1847, he volunteered in the 16th I.V.I.,  Co. D.; he served under Gen. Wood, and was at Monterey; he returned in 1848. Mr. Hug has lived here thirty- five years, and is engaged in teaming and hauling rock; he built the first house on West Seventh Street Hill;  when he came here, he had nothing, and has earned what he has by his own industry.  He married  Miss CatharineWillhaber, a native of Switzerland, Sept. 24, 1849; they have four children- Joseph F., Rela A., Warnnie A., Samuel.   pg.814
CARL F. HUMTKEfarmer, Sec. 23; P.O. Dubuque; born Dec. 31,1810, in Hessian, Germany; in 1839, he came to Baltimore, Md. and thence to Wheeling, Va.; in 1842, came to Dubuque Co. and the following year moved to his present farm; he owns 351 acres of land, part entered and improved.  He married Wilhelmina Halsman in 1839; she was born July 28, 1810, in Hessian, Germany; they have six children-Wilhelmina, Charles F., John H., Mary, Frederick, William and August; they lost one child in infancy.  Mr. Humtke is a Presbyterian in religious belief, and a Republican in politics.   pg.963
J.C. HUNTER, physician and surgeon, corner of Center street and Delhi road, West Dubuque;  is a native of Allegheny Co., Penn., and was born July 8, 1848; his parents came West to Scott Co., Iowa,  in 1854; he grew up and received his education there; studied medicine in Chicago and Philadelphia, and graduated at the University of Pennsylvania in 1873;  he has practiced medicine in Scott Co. one year, and in Keokuk Co. four years, and came to Dubuque in the fall of 1878, and, since then, he has practiced his profession here,and is building up a good practice. He was united in marriage to Miss Mary W. Garber, a native of Pennsylvania, Oct. 1, 1874; they have one son- Rober R.     pg.814
CHARLES H. HUNTINGTON, manufacturer, Cascade; was born Oct. 7, 1835, in Geauga Co., Ohio; left home when but 14, and at age of 15 began blacksmithing, and, with slight interruptions, has continued that business to the present date; in spring of 1855, came West, and in that fall settled in Monticello, and went into general blacksmithing; afterward came to Cascade, and since 1856 has been identified with the business interest of the place; has sometimes employed twenty men in his shop, manufacturing wagons and plows, and repairing reapers and also horseshoeing;  he was for eighteen years associated with D.A. Dickinson in same business, whom he bought out, and now has no partner in carrying on his large manufactory, which is excelled in magnitude by but one, namely, the brewery; he owns the large shop which he occupies, also has a comfortable residence in East Cascade.  He was married, May 9, 1858, to Miss Mary Delay, formerly of Lawrence Co., N.Y.; they have five children, all born in Iowa, and all living at home- William H., Charles H., Mary M., Clara J. and Rachel A. Belle.  Himself and wife are Baptists; he is a Republican; is active member of Ancient Order of United Workers.   pg.913
F.D. HYDE, architect, cor. Main and Seventh street; is a native of the State of Maine, and was born at South Paris, near Portland, March 21, 1849; his parents came West to Galena in 1850; he spent his boyhood in Wisconsin and Minnesota; he studied architecture, and pursued his studies in St. Paul, Minneapolis, Chicago and Boston;  he came to Dubuque and located here in January, 1878, and is taking a leading position in his profession.    pg.814
THOMAS W. HYDE, foreman blacksmithing-shop, Illinois Central Railroad, Dubuque; was born in England July 28, 1818; he came to America in 1831, and grew up and learned his trade in the city of New York; lived there twenty-two years, he came West in 1855, and settled in Dubuque;  he entered the employ of the Illinois Central Railroad in 1863, and has been with the Company seventeen years. He married  Miss Jane Tucker,a native of New York; they have six children- Charles H., ____E., Adoniram J., George W., Fred A. and Nettie.    pg.814-815