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79th LEGISLATURE
Roundup: Powder briefly closes senator's office; new caucus focuses on women's health
Tuesday, March 22, 2005

SECURITY

Powdery mail briefly closes senator's office
MORE ON THIS STORY


Complete Legislature coverage

A senator's office was closed to visitors for about 30 minutes Monday after an aide opened a piece of mail containing a white powder.

Shortly before 10 a.m., Department of Public Safety troopers briefly quarantined seven aides to Sen. Rodney Ellis, D-Houston, in Ellis' office on the Capitol's third floor.

Ellis' spokesman, Jeremy Warren, said the quarantine ended once investigators determined that the substance was more likely baby powder or flour than something lethal.

"It was nothing," Warren said, adding that aides were back to work within an hour.

Ellis was in his Austin apartment at the time, Warren said.

"It's the worry in the back of every government staffer's mind that something like what happened (in Sen. Tom Daschle's office in Washington) could happen. We're just going to try to get through the day as best we can."

In October 2001, a Daschle aide opened mail with a trace of powder believed at the time to be anthrax, leading to a quarantine and antibiotic treatments for 50 staff members.

http://www.statesman.com/news/content/shared/tx/legislature/stories/03/22legebriefs.html






Tuesday, 03/22/05
State briefs: Suspicious powder closes Roane courthouse


The Roane County Courthouse was closed yesterday after a suspicious powder was found in the main hallway, authorities said.

The Roane County hazardous materials team and the Tennessee National Guard's 45th Civil Support Team collected samples and determined the substance was not a biological agent.

The powder was discovered at 9:45 a.m. Local emergency officials, fearing it might be either anthrax or ricin, evacuated the courthouse and called the hazardous materials team and the Guard unit, which specializes in biological substance testing.




The courthouse was expected to reopen for business as usual this morning.

— Associated Press

http://www.tennessean.com/local/archives/05/03/67252614.shtml?Element_ID=67252614




High-tech device fast-scans envelopes for anthrax

By Nancy L. Othón
Staff Writer
Posted March 22 2005


From Deerfield Beach to Fort Pierce, every outgoing envelope -- whether a mortgage payment or a love letter -- is checked for anthrax at Palm Beach County's main postal distribution center near West Palm Beach.

The high-tech device, which attaches to existing sorting equipment at the processing and distribution center on Summit Boulevard, uses DNA matching to detect the presence of anthrax, going through 38,000 pieces of mail an hour.











The West Palm Beach area center is one of roughly 100 distribution centers nationwide to receive the equipment. All processing facilities will have the technology by next year, U.S. Postal Service spokesman Joseph Breckenridge said. The USPS is spending an estimated $500 million on the machines.

Postal workers in the local distribution center have been using the new Biohazard Detection System about a month.

Anthrax spores were found at the distribution center and several other local post offices in 2001. Five people died of anthrax, including local resident and American Media Inc. photo editor Bob Stevens, as well as two Washington, D.C., postal employees.

Postal officials say they are confident the new system, which was designed specifically for the postal service and doesn't slow the daily flow of mail, is accurate and reliable.

Air samples are collected as outgoing mail is run through a machine that cancels stamps. Every hour, the machine shuts down for 45 seconds while the samples that have just been collected are tested. After 30 minutes, results are available. If anthrax is detected, an alarm sounds, triggering evacuation of the facility and the immediate stopping of any delivery vehicles that have left the area, Breckenridge said.

"There's no reliable test that's faster," Breckenridge said.

Postal officials say even if an anthrax-laced letter left the facility, it's practically impossible for it to reach its destination by the time an alarm goes off because the mail goes through other sorting at the facility before being loaded on a truck. Also, any trucks that have left the distribution center within a roughly 90-minute time frame would be stopped, Breckenridge said. FBI agents and postal inspectors would then attempt to zero in on the letter.

"That's probably the toughest assignment there, to find the actual piece," Breckenridge said.

Local union representatives say the new device is a promising development, but they don't think it's enough.

"In a lot of ways, we feel like it's another company making big dollars on something that's not going to protect us," said Lisa Albu, vice president of the Palm Beach Area Local of the American Postal Workers Union. "Even if our building was contaminated today and they cleaned it tomorrow, there's no guarantee someone couldn't contaminate our building [again], and we have to work with that on our minds every single day."

Albu said she also finds fault with the system's limitations in that it tests only for anthrax and not other biological hazards.

The system does have the capability, and eventually will be upgraded to detect other pathogens, Breckenridge said.

"Given the fact we were attacked by anthrax, it's obvious it's one of the pathogens we would test for," he said. "We're focusing on getting this up and running and proven and reliable everywhere first."

The device, which was tested for almost two years, has never signaled a "false positive," Breckenridge said.

"It's very important to us to have a system that doesn't have any false positives because a lot of action kicks in when we have a positive, and what we don't need is a lot of false alarms," he said.

Even with assurances that mail going through such systems are anthrax-free, first-responders such as fire-rescue crews won't change the way they handle a white powder call, Palm Beach County Fire-Rescue spokesman Capt. Don DeLucia said.

"Our attitude is going to be that we will still have to treat any suspicious white powder calls the same way we are now," he said. "I don't think that's going to change until those testing machines are widespread and even then I don't know if there would be any change in procedure."

The biohazard detection system was requested shortly after the 2001 anthrax attacks in an effort to protect employees and customers, Breckenridge said. Parcels, however, aren't currently going through the system.

"We're doing everything within our power. Everything that can be done, we're doing," he said. "What happens if we don't try?"

Nancy Othón can be reached at nothon@sun-sentinel.com or 561-243-6633.



Story last updated at 11:21 a.m. on March 22, 2005


White powder closes Roane County Courthouse Monday



By: Beverly Majors | Oak Ridger Staff
beverly.majors@oakridger.com

Kingston Police Department closed Roane County Courthouse for most of Monday after someone found a white powder substance in a back corridor.

Chief Jim Washam said the courthouse was evacuated shortly before 10 a.m. and did not reopen until about 3:45 p.m. Washam said the powder field tested positive for protein and "neutral pH." Anthrax and other viruses have those components.

Washam said members of the Tennessee National Guard's 45th District Army Reserve from Murfreesboro brought a mobile lab to the courthouse, collected the rest of the powder and tested again. Roane County officials also sent a sample for testing to a crime lab.

Once the results were complete, the powder turned out to be coffee creamer.

Washam said several emergency response agencies came to the scene to help in the evacuation and possible hazardous materials cleanup.

Courts were canceled for the day but were rescheduled for Tuesday.






 
 
 

 

 

 

 

Anthrax scare hits Labour offices

Eight other political figures across London were also sent hoax packages including Government minister and leader of the House of Commons, Peter Hain.

 

nlnews@inuk.co.uk
19 January 2005
ISLINGTON'S Labour Party offices were sealed off for three hours after a suspected anthrax attack.

Police and firefighters wearing protective chemical suits and gas masks rushed to the building after a member of staff opened a letter addressed to MEP Claude Moraes containing small silver packages of white powder.

They quarantined the building and stopped anyone entering or leaving.

When firefighters used a hi-tech infra-red beam to test the powder the results proved inconclusive.

They had to call in a chemicals expert to check out the talcum powder-like substance before finally giving concerned staff the all clear.

Office assistant John Greenshields, 24, whose hands were covered in the fake anthrax, said: "We were not allowed to leave the building for about three hours to stop anything spreading. It was like something out of ET.

"The thought that the powder could be anthrax did cross my mind but the fire brigade were quite confident that it wasn't deadly because we were still standing. We got itchy hands and faces but I think that was just the mind playing tricks."

He added: "The police and fire brigade were marvellous but it was quite unusual for a Monday morning, I have to say."

Islington Labour group leader, Councillor Catherine West, arrived at the offices for a meeting just seconds before the letter was opened. She was quarantined along with five other people in the building.

"We were very calm and very pleased that the fire brigade and police were there in no time," she said. "We carried on with the meeting and it was all very professionally dealt with by the emergency services. The guys came in their suits which looked like they'd come from Mars."

Police say a motive for the hoax has yet to be established but the address on the back of the letter has since been found to be fictitious.

Eight other political figures across
London were also sent hoax packages including Government minister and leader of the House of Commons, Peter Hain.

 

 

 

POWDER IN TORIES’ POST SPARKS TERRORISM ALERT
POLITICAL activity at Stratford Conservative Association ground to a halt on Tuesday when staff discovered a potential terrorist threat in their post.

Police rushed to the association’s headquarters in Trinity Street, Stratford, after an envelope containing a suspicious white substance was opened by an unsuspecting employee.

The building and surrounding street were cordoned off and scenes of crime officers were drafted in to deal with the suspect package.

Staff members waited anxiously inside the building while officers investigated the incident.

 

 

 

 

White Powder Hoax At City Hall

Jan 13, 2005 3:11 pm US/Eastern
PHILADELPHIA (KYW 1060)
A powder substance and a threatening note to a Philadelphia judge led to some scary moments Thursday at City Hall.

Police lieutenant Michael Brady says a secretary for a senior Common Pleas judge opened a letter and out poured a powdery substance:

"There is a young lady who opens the mail for that office, and she opened it up and she apparently got some residual on her hands."

The area around the first-floor office of the judge -- who was not identified -- was cordoned off. A fire department hazardous material ("hazmat") team analyzed the substance and gave the all-clear. The envelope also contained a threatening note to the judge.

The investigation into the incident is continuing.

Leonard Thomas is the US Postal Service carrier who delivered the letter. He says he lives with a fear of anthrax every day:

"Ever since 9/11 and the incidents we had with the anthrax, it's always a problem. It does bother me that I could be handling something that could be harmful to myself or someone else."

Lt. Brady says these days, vigilance is mandatory:

"We've got to play it safe every time. We've got to bring the people out, we've got to bring the equipment out. We've got to be sure."

Brady says threats of terrorism now crop up at City Hall a few times each year.

In 2003, a letter sent to
Mayor Street contained a powder that turned out to be artificial coffee creamer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BREAKING NEWS

 

This story is from our news.com.au network

Source: Reuters

 

 

Powder shuts Danish parliament

January 11, 2005

DANISH police examined suspicious white powder received at the prime minister's office today and closed the parliament, officials said.

"The police are now examining some white powder we received today in the prime minister's office," a spokesman from the office said.

Officials at the Danish parliament said police had requested that the entire building, which includes the prime minister's office, be cordoned off and the internal ventilation system be shut down.

Denmark's Prime Minister Anders Fogh Rasmussen is a staunch US ally and the Nordic country has more than 500 troops in Iraq.


 

 

Anthrax scare slows local mail delivery

The Post Office station on Flandro Drive got a nasty present for Christmas, an anthrax scare. Journal photo by Doug Lindley

 

 

 

 

Suspicious powder discovered in letter

By Debbie Bryce - Journal Writer

 

POCATELLO - Postal operations in Pocatello were delayed for about 16 hours Monday after a letter containing a suspicious white powder substance was discovered, officials said.

Pocatello Police Lt. Brad Hunt said the envelope, addressed to a residence in Rexburg, also contained a letter claiming the powder substance was anthrax.

Hunt said initial lab tests conducted in Boise did not identify the powder, but concluded it was not anthrax.

The envelope contained no return address, but the Rexburg address was legitimate and accurate, he said.

The Pocatello Police Department is working in cooperation with U.S. Postal authorities and the FBI to determine where the letter originated, he said. Homeland Security has also been notified.

Hunt said the name of the addressee is being withheld pending the investigation. Investigators do not know if the resident in Rexburg was expecting the package or knew the sender.

Pocatello Postmaster Bruce Wiese said the Post Office followed established procedure to protect postal workers and the public.

"Everyone cooperated with remarkable precision and it worked out well," he said.

Wiese said some mail delivery to outlying counties was temporarily delayed, but operations have resumed and most of the mail has gone out.

He said the incident posed no threat to the public.

Pocatello Police responded to the Pocatello Gateway Station at 1750 Flandro Drive just after 5:30 p.m. The building was shut down and a hazardous materials team was dispatched.

Hunt said officers worked first to secure the suspicious material and the area while safeguarding workers who may have been exposed.

He said his office has received numerous calls regarding suspicious material over the past several years, but none have been legitimate.

Kelly Kleinvachter, FBI spokesperson, said agents plan to interview the letter's intended recipient today.

A culture is being done to determine the substance's content, Kleinvachter said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

An unwelcome envelope delivers unsettling news

December 29, 2004

BARRE — At newspapers we try to cover the news, not be in it.

That changed dramatically Monday for us a few minutes before
4 p.m.


The letter was crudely scribbled with "Times Argus Editor" and our address. It was small, poorly sealed, a bit wrinkled and had a bulky letter inside it. Aside from being a bit more scrawled than most, it looked not much different from a lot of other hand-written material we get here, generically addressed, mixed in among the daily flood of press releases, announcements, pamphlets, reports and manila envelopes.

Some are written by kids, others by elders whose hand writing is shaky. So I didn't think anything of it when I tore it open, looked inside and pulled out a poorly folded piece of lined yellow legal paper. With it came a fine white powder, which spilled on the floor, got on my hands and as I was to notice later with amusing results — though much here was not be laughed at — on my pants.

In a split second, a normal workday plunged into an
Alice's rabbit hole of modern-day terror concerns, emergency protocols and procedures, and you-can't-be-too careful attitudes that are equal parts prudent precaution and absurdity. And I was right at its center, looking at the grinning Cheshire cat of lunacy in our modern world.

The mail normally is opened and distributed by the time I come in, but with holiday vacations the stack had not been touched. As deputy editor, I always like to rummage through the pile for news ideas and see who is writing about what on the letters front, since I oversee the letters page and editorials. The letters page here has long been a vibrant and passionate and well-read forum: It's the editorial edge of the fault line of all the issues that shake
America. Abortion, the Iraq
war, patriotism, what's public information and what's not, crime and punishment, you name it.

When the powder spilled out, I went, "What?" Then the mental calculus feverishly started adding and subtracting.

On one side of the equation: This is
Vermont
. The letter was mailed in Barre, no one here is going to have anthrax or poison. We can't possibly have made anyone this mad. No one's crazy enough here to put something evil in a letter. This can't be happening here.

On the other side of the equation I figured: It's 99.9 percent against the chances some crank got hold of something poison and mailed it to us. But the tiny percent chance that I was wrong carried a lot of weight. I had been exposed, two other newsroom staffers and Ron, the building supervisor, had been there, the fine powder had spilled on the floor. What if it really was something toxic? I knew I could not take that chance. What I didn't know is the enormity of the reaction the letter would set off.

I got a plastic trash bag and put the envelope in it and put it on my desk. I went to wash my hands, rinsed my mouth out with water, told the news staffers what had happened. I first called the post office and they told me to call the police. I reported what happened, noting it was probably nothing but just to be safe, I felt we had to report it.

Within seconds the scanner erupted. Police arrived, fire trucks arrived and two firemen donned respirators — Homeland Security funds at work — walked back with me (with no respirator) to inspect the envelope, then came back and reported to a superior. Newsroom staffers continued their business, watching with amusement, and amazement. A Barre police officer took my name and address. We wondered what would unfold.

What followed was four hours of disruption, humor, discussion, frustration. The newspaper was quarantined. Some 25 employees could not leave at day's end, and were brought to the newspaper's foyer away from the newsroom. Some had to make emergency arrangements for baby and child care, others were delayed going home after a long day.

Outside, curious commuters drove by looking at the emergency apparatus in our parking lot, lights flashing; editors, reporters and pressroom staff were prevented from getting in to put out the paper.

One dinky letter had brought central
Vermont
's emergency response system to full alert, disrupting the paper and mobilizing the local emergency machinery. The hospital was notified, and a hazardous materials team called.

It took them a couple of hours to arrive, during which time our heating and ventilation system was shut down just in case, and those of us stuck inside cracked jokes with the emergency crews.

The deadly seriousness of the what-ifs played against the absurdity of the huge response required. We seesawed between gallows humor and concern, understanding and wondering what the world had come to — what even sane
Vermont
had come too — if this was all necessary.

A half-dozen city firefighters were forced to stand around, along with a Barre police officer and the commanding officer of the state police Middlesex Barracks, Lt. David Harrington and other Barre officials. The static squawk of emergency radios erupted on and off and off in the newsroom, now evacuated, white-suit clad "hazmat" investigators with their testing kits worked trying to rule out poison or toxic substances. In a delicious irony, this occurred on the desk of a staffer finicky about keeping it clean and neat.

Because I had spilled some of the powder on my pants, I was asked to take off my clothes as a precaution, put them in a plastic bag and don a bright blue crinkly tarp-like double-size decontamination suit brought in by the hazmat team, courtesy of Homeland Security.

I looked ridiculous, like the Michelin man or a deflated balloon figure; my penance for bringing all this on (though staffers said at least it nicely brought out the blue in my eyes.) Trust me: Hazmat suit chic is a nonstarter on the fashion scene. Yet if it was poison, if by some tiny chance we had been exposed, there would be no humor.

We learned a decontamination shower might have to be set up outside, in zero-degree weather. Some female employees, with a tinge of worry, wanted to know just how that might work. A suggestion was made that a hydrant would be opened and they'd run me through it naked.

And so it went, until around
7 p.m.
, hazmat chief Christopher Herrick, still wearing his white protective suit, announced the powder was probably some kind of salt, not cyanide or anthrax or arsenic or something else dangerous. That was confirmed Tuesday in a final test by the Vermont Health Department.

We could all go home to our families and homes, or finally get to work, four hours late in trying to put out the paper. We could put aside the knowledge that this was a deadly serious business for emergency crews, despite all the jokes and inconvenience. Some day it could be for real.

I never got to read the letter that caused the problem, since Lt. Harrington declined to give it to us or release the information. There's more than one way to skin the news cat, though. We learned that the unsigned letter objected to our printing bankruptcy information in the Sunday paper. At least we knew what had disrupted our lives and business, no thanks to the police.

It all amounted to a four-hour false alarm, but a costly one. We all know any news organization – any business or government agency for that matter – faces the same risk in a world where angry or disassociated people increasingly feel it's OK to vent their frustrations with a hoax. I just never figured it would happen here.

But it did. And that's a lesson for us all.

 
 
Times Argus receives white powder in mail

December 28, 2004

BARRE — A letter containing white powder and a threat brought fire crews, Vermont State Police and the Vermont Hazardous Materials Response Team rushing to The Times Argus newspaper offices Monday afternoon.

The letter, addressed in barely legible handwriting to "Times Argus Editor," was mailed from Barre. It was opened by deputy editor Andrew Nemethy at about 3:30 p.m. as he was going through a pile of mail.

When Nemethy opened the envelope, a white powder sifted out and he closed it back up and placed it in a plastic bag. He then called Barre City Police. The police informed the fire department.

The call, in light of post-9/11 and anthrax attack sensibilities, launched a probe that caused considerable disruption at the newspaper and drew a fleet of emergency vehicles and officials to the offices on North Main Street.

More than four hours later, the powder was ruled out as arsenic, cyanide or anthrax and determined to be a nonhazardous sodium substance by the Vermont Hazardous Materials Response Team.

State Police Lt. David Harrington, who was on the scene, said state and federal authorities, including the FBI, will investigate the incident.

The letter's contents were not read by Nemethy and not divulged by Harrington, but another source indicated it was critical of The Times Argus and the Rutland Herald for publishing bankruptcy information in the Sunday edition. Bankruptcies are public information.

Harrington also said the handwritten letter indicated the "threat" may continue and advised both papers to be cautious about their mail handling procedures. Harrington called the threat "nonspecific."

"The threat is probably ongoing. You may receive another package," Harrington said.

During the investigation, 25 to 30 employees were not allowed to leave the building and rescue vehicles filled the building's North Main Street parking lot.

Other employees were kept outside while waiting for the hazardous materials crew to arrive. Two firefighters arrived first and donned breathing apparatus to examine the enveloped wrapped in plastic on a desk in the newsroom. They then secured the scene until the Hazmat team could arrive, Barre City Fire Department Lt. Russell Ashe said.

The Vermont Hazardous Materials Response Team determined the powder was a salt, team Chief Christopher Herrick said.

Prior to the Hazmat team's investigation, Barre City Manager Richard Fitzgerald noted, "They can determine if it's a chemical substance."

He listed sugar and baking powder as examples. Anthrax is a biological substance, he said.

"We don't test for anthrax. It's probably not anthrax, because it didn't react like a biological," Herrick said at around 7 p.m. to employees who were gathered at the front of the building.

"It looked like a salt. It is a salt. It's not arsenic and it's not cyanide," Herrick said, reassuring employees. "I'm just going to go wash my hands and pick up my kids and go home."

Investigators took the substance for further testing by the Health Department. The Health Department was expected to confirm within 24 hours that the substance was not anthrax, Herrick said.

The letter did not have a return address nor was it signed.

Officials pointed out such hoaxes inflict costs as well as inconvenience.

"Somebody's got to pay for all of this," Barre City Cpl. Henry Duhaime said. "Even a hoax like this still needs to be investigated. It's caused quite a problem here, plus it's against the law."

Newspaper production was delayed. Employees were evacuated out of work areas, including the news and production rooms, to the front of the building while the Hazmat team worked. Second shift employees were also not allowed to enter the building to work.

The Times Argus incident is the city's fifth. Rescuers have responded to anthrax scares at the Barre post office, the Comics Outpost, Spaulding High School and Cochrane's Inc., a granite manufacturer. None turned out to be anthrax. The powder found at the post office three years ago was candy. The powder found at the high school was white line striping, officials recalled.

Had The Times Argus' letter been anthrax, employees would have to be decontaminated by removing clothing and going through a series of wash stations, Ashe said. Employees would then have then been given new clothes or blue Tyvek suits to wear.

The powder did fall on Nemethy's pants when he opened the letter in The Times Argus newsroom. His clothes were bagged and he was made to wear a blue Tyvek-type suit.

Anthrax is an infectious disease caused by the spore-forming bacteria called Bacillus anthracis. Infection in humans most often involves the skin (cutaneous anthrax), the gastrointestinal tract or the lungs (inhalation anthrax).

Cutaneous anthrax is an infection of the skin. Inhalation anthrax develops when anthrax spores enter the lungs. Early stages of the infection are treated with antibiotics.

A letter containing anthrax spores mailed to Sen. Patrick Leahy was discovered on Nov. 16, 2001. The letter to the Vermont Democrat was discovered in a batch of unopened mail sent to Capitol Hill and quarantined since the discovery of an anthrax-contaminated letter to then-Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle, D-S.D., on Oct. 15, 2001.

The threat of terrorism has caused U.S. Department of Homeland Security money to flood into the state. Barre City Fire Department's decontamination unit and breathing apparatus were funded by federal Homeland Security funds, firefighters noted.

Contact Robin Palmer at robin.palmer@timesargus.com or 479-0191, ext. 1171.

 
 
 

 

Newspaper takes legal action to get letter's contents

December 29, 2004


BARRE – The Times Argus is taking legal action to learn the contents of a letter police removed from the North Main Street newspaper Monday evening as part of an investigation into an anthrax hoax.

The letter, addressed in child-like script to the paper's editor, was opened by Deputy Editor Andrew Nemethy Monday afternoon. It contained a white powder and was placed in a plastic bag until firefighters, police and Vermont Hazardous Materials Response Team could arrive.

After employees spent close to three hours quarantined in the building, the hazmat team determined the powder to be salt, not the bio-terrorism agent anthrax. The Health Department Tuesday confirmed that finding, Barre City Police Chief Trevor Whipple said.

Now The Times Argus is taking legal action to learn the contents of the letter that state police Lt. David Harrington said further threatens The Times Argus and its sister paper, the Rutland Herald.

The letter criticizes the paper for publishing bankruptcies in its Sunday edition, a source said. And employees have been cautioned by police about their handling of future mail.

"We want to see exactly what threats it may contain. It would help us to protect ourselves against any threats it may contain," said newspaper attorney Robert Hemley, of the
Burlington
law firm Gravel and Shea, explaining the reason behind the paper's request. "It underscores the need for clear procedures with respect to correspondence."

The paper is specifically asking for a copy of the letter or to have its contents disclosed to the paper, Hemley said.

Editor Maria Archangelo made the request to both the Barre City Police Department and Vermont State Police in Middlesex in a letter faxed to the two departments late Tuesday afternoon.

The paper is arguing for a copy of the letter under the state's Access to Public Records Act, which makes public documents available for review and inspection and is modeled after the Freedom of Information Act, Hemley said.

A second argument is that the letter is the property of The Times Argus, the lawyer said. "It's essentially our letter. It belongs to us. We gave it to police" by inviting officers into the newspaper building, Hemley said.

"That letter was addressed to me, and we have a right to know what is in it. I view it as our mail," Archangelo agreed.

She added: "Not only is it an important part of the story that we are trying to tell, but it makes me uncomfortable in this time of increased secrecy in government. The Times Argus has never shied away from taking on legal challenges to government secrecy, whether that secrecy comes in the form of closed meetings or sealed documents. We are not about to start now."

If police refuse to release a copy of the letter, the next step would be a civil suit in Washington Superior Court in
Montpelier
, Hemley said.

Whipple Tuesday said he would deny the newspaper's request.

"It's been turned over to the FBI. It's in their possession. Right now they're conducting an investigation, and even if I hadn't turned the letter over to the FBI, I would not be able to make it available to The Times Argus," the police chief said.

Whipple said he found it "odd that there is such a demand" for the letter.

"This is a criminal offense. It's a piece of evidence in a criminal matter," Whipple said, noting he'd never heard of another case where evidence was returned to the victim before the conclusion of the crime.

"Clearly the contents of this letter are key elements of the crime and at this point only the investigators and the accused, the perpetrator, know what's in it," Whipple said. Revealing that evidence early would "taint" the case, he said. "So I will not make it available."

Hemley argued that the letter is not exempt from the Access to Public Records Act.

"The police will say it is exempt because it is a record dealing with the detection and prevention of a crime. It is our view that that exemption does not extend to actual evidence created by third parties. It rather relates to internal memorandum or reports that reflect the police thought process … ," the lawyer said, noting the paper will "pursue this through the courts if necessary."

Contact Robin Palmer at
robin.palmer@timesargus.com or 479-0191, ext. 1171.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Updated: December 29th, 2004 10:18:21 AM

Vermont Newspaper Wants Copy of Threatening Letter in Police Possession

............


Associated Press

BARRE, Vt. (AP) -- The Times Argus is taking legal action to learn the contents of a threatening letter it received this week as part of an anthrax hoax.

The letter contained a threat and a white powder that was later determined to be a sodium substance. Police removed the letter from the newspaper's building Monday.

The paper is asking for a copy of the letter or to have its contents disclosed to the paper, said the newspaper's attorney, Robert Hemley, of the Burlington law firm Gravel and Shea.

``We want to see exactly what threats it may contain. It would help us to protect ourselves against any threats it may contain,'' he said. ``It underscores the need for clear procedures with respect to correspondence.''

Editor Maria Archangelo made the request to both the Barre City Police Department and Vermont State Police in Middlesex in a letter faxed to the two departments late Tuesday afternoon.

State Police Lt. David Harrington said the letter threatens The Times Argus and its sister paper, the Rutland Herald.

The paper is arguing for a copy of the letter under the state's Access to Public Records Act, which makes public documents available for review and inspection.

A second argument is that the letter is the property of The Times Argus, the lawyer said.

``That letter was addressed to me, and we have a right to know what is in it. I view it as our mail,'' Archangelo said.

The Access to Public Records Act gives the departments two days to notify the paper of its decision regarding releasing the contents of the letter.

If the agency refuse to release a copy of the letter, the next step would be a civil lawsuit in Washington Superior Court in Montpelier, Hemley said.

Barre City Police Chief Trevor Whipple said Tuesday he would deny the newspaper's request.

``It's been turned over to the FBI. It's in their possession. Right now they're conducting an investigation, and even if I hadn't turned the letter over to the FBI, I would not be able to make it available to The Times Argus,'' the police chief said.

``This is a criminal offense. It's a piece of evidence in a criminal matter,'' Whipple said.

Hemley argued that the letter is not exempt from the Access to Public Records Act.

``The police will say it is exempt because it is a record dealing with the detection and prevention of a crime. It is our view that that exemption does not extend to actual evidence created by third parties,'' Hemley said.

Related:

 

 

 

Editor's reaction

December 29, 2004

When my phone rang at about 4:30 p.m. Monday and I was informed that The Times Argus office was in a lockdown because of an "anthrax scare," my first thought was, "You have got to be kidding me." Actually, that thought was peppered with some expletives better left unsaid here.

I lived through Sept. 11 in a newsroom filled with people whose spouses were in the Pentagon when the plane hit. I stood next to them while we watched the devastation on television and we all held on to the office furniture and each other to feel something solid.

A year later I lived through three horrible weeks when the Baltimore-Washington area was under siege by snipers. My children couldn't go outside for recess and my daughter cried because she feared getting shot through the dining room window while doing her homework.

When those things happened, I remembered thinking that all of us were just simply living our lives and doing our work when unknown evils arrived on our doorsteps. We had no idea of the forces at work that had nothing really to do with us, but that could change our lives in an instant.

That feeling of helplessness came flooding back on Monday. I am the leader of the Times Argus newsroom. I respect and cherish my staff. We have been through a lot together in the 21 months since I arrived here. Now, something was happening to them and I couldn't help. Hell, I couldn't even get in the building.

I worked the phones from home furiously for hours. Talking with the staff, talking with other department heads. Making sure someone was taking notes and photos about the powder-laden letter that showed up in my newsroom and threw the entire newspaper staff into a panic.

When I found out the police would not let us see the contents of the letter — a letter addressed to the "editor" of the paper — I started calling our lawyers to get us access to the letter.

There was a strange mix of disbelief, giddiness and fear in the newspaper office. No one could get in or out, but the emergency response team didn't seem to be in much of a hurry. It took hours for the hazardous materials crew to arrive and no one was ever evacuated from the building.

My memory of anthrax scares after Sept. 11 included swift evacuations, quarantines and fast-moving Hazmat teams. Our scare seemed to play out in slow motion, over a nearly four-hour period.

During that time, I went from thinking this was ridiculous, to worrying about my young reporter who has an infant at home but was trapped in the building. What if there was poison in the office? How could I let my staff go through this without me?

Deputy Editor Andrew Nemethy, who opened the letter that launched the investigation, bore the brunt of the craziness. Forced to strip and wear a blue moon suit, he endured a lot of teasing inside the building.

But underneath all of the silliness was a creepy edge. Here we were, simply doing our jobs, and someone with a grudge could disrupt our entire operation for hours with a simple prank. Why would someone hate us that much? Of course, at the newspaper, we get our share of strange e-mails and calls. I recently received letters from a local man almost every day for a very long time. Every day. It was odd, but not scary.

When the anthrax (or arsenic or any other kind of poison) scare was finally over, I was surprised at how relieved I felt. Was I really worried? The answer was yes, and I resolved to do whatever I could to keep my staff safe in the future.

We will pay more attention to letters that arrive with strange writing and no return address. We will be more vigilant about who enters the building, especially after hours. And we will not act like we are afraid. We will continue to do the best job that we can do and maintain our commitment to community news. We are part of this community, and this attack was aimed at the community, too.

As with most rotten experiences in my life, I have been able to see some surprisingly hopeful signs in the aftermath. When I turned on my computer Tuesday morning, I had several emails from readers and advertisers offering their support of The Times Argus staff. While most of the calls were positive, we did have one strange call from a woman who said she wanted to cancel her subscription because she was afraid to touch the newspaper. She thought it might be contaminated. Over the years I have heard a lot of excuses for why people don't want to take the paper anymore. This was new territory.

Throughout the day calls came in from people who wanted us to know that we were in their prayers. Friends in the community called to ask how I was doing, and some seemed surprised that we could joke about it so soon. Still, I felt compelled to warn the pizza delivery guy that if he came in the building, he might not be able to leave.

I was joking, I think.

Maria Archangelo

Editor

 

 

 

9:17am (UK)
Tests on Powder after Sorting Office Alert

By Brian Farmer, PA

Scientists were today analysing a white powder which leaked from a package in a mail sorting depot, police said.

Four workers underwent checks in hospital after the powder was spotted seeping from a package at the depot in King’s Lynn, Norfolk, late last night.

A police spokesman said one worker had complained of skin irritation but all had been released from hospital after undergoing precautionary tests.

He said a small amount of the powder had leaked from a package and scientists were analysing the substance to try to establish what it was.

Part of the depot was sealed off and the workers isolated after the incident was reported.
 
 
 
 

 
 
Powder find, embassy closed



THE Norwegian Embassy in Sri Lanka was closed today after a packet containing some white powder was received in the mail, an embassy official said.

After the powder was discovered, staff were told to leave the embassy and go home, said the official, who spoke on the telephone from outside the embassy in the posh Ward Place district of the capital. The official spoke on condition of anonymity.

The packet has been sent for chemical examination to determine if it anthrax or another toxic substance.

Norwegian peace envoy, Eric Solheim, who helped broker a ceasefire between Tamil Tiger rebels and government, is in Colombo trying to persuade the two sides to resume their peace talks that were stalled in April 2003 when the rebels withdrew from the talks.


 
 
 

Suspicious Powder Causes Windsor Locks Post Office Shutdown

UPDATED: 11:56 AM EST November 30, 2004

WEST HARTFORD, Conn. -- Developing Story: According to reports, inspectors from the Department of Environmental Protection are on the scene at the post office in Windsor Locks to investigate the discovery of an unknown substance, NBC 30 Connecticut News reported.

 

 

 

Firefighters responded to a report of a hazardous material call after receiving a call that a powdery substance had been found. The powder was found Tuesday morning and the facility has been evacuated.

Other agencies are reportedly on the way to the scene, including the Connecticut Department of Homeland Security.

The facility is located at 10 Main St.

 

 

 

 

 

Chemical scare at Royal Mail office

Dec 22 2004

 

A chemical scare was sparked at a Royal Mail mail sorting office as white powder leaked from a package.

Four workers at the delivery office in King's Lynn, Norfolk, were taken to a decontamination unit as one of them complained of skin irritation.

Fire and ambulance services rushed to the scene at the Austin Fields depot after police were alerted to the incident.

Postal staff said a small amount of the powder had apparently leaked from a package over a couple of other parcels that were being sorted by the four workers.

The employees were isolated and then later taken for check-ups at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, King's Lynn.

They were all later released.

A spokesman for Norfolk Constabulary said investigators recovered the powder which was then taken for analysis.

 
 

Air traffic disrupted at Albany International

Investigation of suspicious substance in cargo hold of United Express plane causes some gate closures

 

By BRUCE A. SCRUTON, Staff writer
Last updated: 1:25 p.m., Wednesday, December 22, 2004

COLONIE -- While a passenger said the substance was rice flour, officials at the Albany County International Airport were on full alert until a lab's test results are available on an "off-white powder'' found in an airplane cargo hold this morning.

A United Express flight from Chicago with 83 passengers and crew landed about 9:30 a.m. and as baggage handlers were unloading the cargo hold, they discovered the powder around a canvas bag.

Airport spokesman Doug Myers said policy dictates that all precautions be taken until tests are complete. As a result, the plane's hold was resealed and the plane pushed away from the terminal building.

Albany County sheriff's deputies and Transporation Safety Administration employees began questioning the passengers. Meanwhile, gates in the area of the plane were shut down for a time as the north side of the terminal building was isolated.

Some flights which had landed were held for a time on the taxiways until other gates could be cleared.

In addition to the airport's own fire department, the West Albany and Shaker Road-Loudonville departments were at the scene. Myers said the two employees who entered the baggage hold were isolated and would undergo decontamination. No passengers was detained for decontamination.

Wednesday, September 29, 2004
Copyright © Las Vegas Review-Journal

Powder, letter force TV station to evacuate


REVIEW-JOURNAL


A hate letter packaged with a suspicious brown powder forced KTNV-TV, Channel 13, to evacuate Tuesday and broadcast its evening newscasts from another station.

A receptionist opened the letter about 10 a.m., prompting calls to Las Vegas police and the hazardous materials team from the Clark County Fire Department, police officer Jose Montoya said.

Channel 13's building on Valley View Boulevard near Desert Inn Road was evacuated while hazmat crews sealed off the structure and collected the powder.

The building remained empty late Tuesday while the powder was sent to Reno for testing.

Las Vegas police were investigating the origin of the letter to ABC's Las Vegas affiliate and believed it could be related to a similar letter with a similar powder that was opened Monday at an ABC affiliate outside Phoenix, Montoya said.

That powder turned out to be beach sand, and the letter had been sent from Portland, Ore., he said.

Unable to broadcast from its studio, the Channel 13 news staff moved in to the building shared by stations KFBT-TV, Channel 33, and KVWB-TV, Channel 21, to broadcast its evening newscasts.

Carla Carlini, news manager for the stations, said there was no problem sharing space with a competitor.

"We are all competitors in the news business, but we're all working to achieve the same goal," Carlini said. "That goal is to serve the public."
















Powder makes Dutch postal workers sick


AMSTERDAM, Netherlands (AP) - Five Dutch postal workers became ill after handling a piece of mail containing yellow powder Sunday evening, police said.

Police spokeswoman Claudia Metz in the city of Alkmaar said the workers weren't seriously sickened, and that the powder was not anthrax. However, she said those who came in contact with it had difficulty breathing and one mailman was briefly hospitalized before being released.

"It was nasty stuff," Metz said of the yellow powder, which is being tested.

Alkmaar is around 40 kilometres north of Amsterdam.

The mailman who was hospitalized picked the letter or package up from a public mailbox in the centre of the city during his Sunday rounds. He brought it to a local distribution centre where he and the others became ill.

Authorities initially sealed off areas surrounding both the mailbox and the distribution centre. Workers were later allowed to leave the centre, although the mailbox remained cordoned off while the powder was further examined, Metz said.

It was not immediately clear who, if anyone, was being targeted by the mailing. Police would not release further details about the package, including where it was addressed, while the investigation continued.

In December, two letter bombs were sent to police agencies based in the Netherlands as part of a spate of mailings to European Union bodies.


washingtonpost.com

Suspicious Powders, Packages Keep FBI Unit on Edge

By Allan Lengel
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, April 13, 2004; Page A01
 

The mail facility at Reagan National Airport shut down for 90 minutes last month after a grainy, green powder spilled from a package from Ethiopia, raising fears of a biological hazard. It turned out to be ground-up dried peas.

The Columbia Heights Metro station was shut down recently after something mushy was spotted there. It was chicken and brown rice. A few weeks ago, traces of a white substance were found on a package at the Pentagon, triggering concern. An analysis showed that the mystery material was Alfredo sauce.

Ever since the deadly anthrax mailings 21/2 years ago, the FBI's National Capital Response Squad has responded to thousands of false alarms involving suspicious substances or packages. Lately, the squad has handled an average of five to 10 incidents a week, but the numbers can jump much higher, often depending on events at home or abroad.

"In the very beginning, it was hard not to think every time you roll out the door that it's the end of the world," said FBI supervisor Jim Rice, who heads the squad. "Then you get a lot of historical perspective. We still treat each one like it's real until we prove that it's not."

Interviews with Rice and other agents on the squad provided a look at the challenges they face in Washington, where hypersensitivity over unfamiliar substances and unattended packages can lead to evacuations, road closures and traffic jams. Nowhere in the nation are the scares more prevalent than here.

Nearly every case has turned out to be a false alarm -- a result of suspicions that proved unfounded or a hoax. Agents still are attempting to determine how traces of ricin wound up in a letter-opening machine in the office of Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-Tenn.). The traces were discovered Feb. 2, and squad members spent days at the scene. No one was harmed, but the episode was a reminder of the importance of this often tedious work.

The squad, created in 1999, more than doubled in size in fall 2001 to handle the spike in calls generated by fears about anthrax. It now has 15 agents, all of whom are hazmat specialists, bomb or crime evidence technicians or SWAT team members.

In most instances, the FBI's Joint Terrorism Task Force, made up of members of 24 federal and local agencies, goes along and works on the follow-up investigation.
White Powder Alert
 

It's shortly before 9 a.m. on a recent Friday. On the fourth floor of the FBI's Washington field office, just blocks from the U.S. Capitol, some agents are at their desks, working on investigations of suspicious incidents.

A call comes in.

An agent from the National Capital Response Squad grabs a marker and begins writing on an oversize pad on an easel:

"White powder letter at the Navy yard. Threatens potus. Appears to be jail mail."

"Potus" is shorthand for "president of the United States." "Jail mail" is correspondence from a prisoner. Two agents head out to examine the letter, which initially aroused suspicion at a government mail-processing facility in Washington. It was then secured in a protective container and brought to the Washington Navy Yard in Southeast for further examination.

The D.C. Fire and Emergency Medical Services hazmat team, already on the scene, does field tests for biological hazards, radiation and explosives. Everything comes up negative. The team briefs FBI agents, who keep a distance from the letter for safety reasons.

The agents then call FBI headquarters to tell what they found. The case is not over: FBI officials decide that the threat to the president calls for a criminal investigation. They notify a Secret Service agent assigned to the Joint Terrorism Task Force, and the probe begins.

The agents take the powdery material to a lab to confirm that it is not hazardous.

Jail mail is common, agents say, and often contains talcum powder, plaster or dried toothpaste. According to the agents, inmates in state prisons sometimes send the letters hoping a federal conviction will land them in a federal prison with better conditions. In other cases, prisoners send threatening letters and sign the names of enemies they want to get in trouble.

Kevin Finnerty, an agent on the Capital Response Squad, said prisoners typically would not have the expertise or the materials to send letters laced with anthrax. But he said all threats must be taken seriously.

Prisoners are not the only ones known to pull hoaxes. Finnerty recalled an episode in which someone left a package in the Friendship Heights Metro station. The unknown culprit wanted to write "anthrax" on the package, but kept misspelling the word and crossing it out.

Afterward, Finnerty said, some agents quipped: "If you can't spell anthrax, you probably can't make it."

Response Squad agents estimated that 40 percent of the calls they handle involve hoaxes. Staging such a hoax in a mass-transit system carries a maximum prison term of five years to life, depending on the circumstances, according to the U.S. attorney's office. Sending a threatening letter to a federal official carries a maximum prison term of 10 years.

Finnerty and other agents said that it is necessary to respond to false alarms but that their time could be better spent.

"I think it's a frustration for the police, the fire department, other agencies and us," Finnerty said. "You can be working on something very important when you have to go out and investigate, and then you have to do a follow up investigation. That eats up manpower."

Paste From 'Planet Earth'

At 12:05 p.m. on that recent Friday, the squad's phone rings again. An agent writes on the big pad: "letter containing brown paste to u.s. patent office; talks about C-4 at Navy yard; FPS; dcfd-hazmat on the scene."

The notation means that a threatening letter, addressed to the Patent Office, talks about explosives, that the letter is at the Navy Yard, that the Federal Protective Service has been alerted and that the fire department's hazmat crew has arrived at the scene.

Two agents rush to the Navy Yard and again find no evidence of a terrorist plot. The address on the large yellow envelope includes the words "Planet Earth" and "Milky Way." The "brown paste" appears to be a smushed sandwich or banana bread. The letter contains no reference to explosives, as originally thought. But this call, too, requires some follow-up.

Agents locate and interview the sender, who has some mental health problems but is deemed harmless. No criminal case is opened.

Many Types of False Alarm

The FBI squad does not go out every time a suspicious substance is reported. The U.S. Capitol Police hazmat team responds to more of these calls, an average of three to 10 a day on Capitol Hill. Most are cleared without summoning the FBI, said Capitol Police Chief Terrance W. Gainer.

Some fears are relatively easy to dispel: cleanser in a restroom, white powder near a box of powdered doughnuts, creamer near a coffee maker, a crushed mint or candy on a subway platform, talcum powder in jail mail. In one case, a local real estate broker sent sand in a mass mailing to promote beachfront property.

Still, agent Rice said, the recent discovery of ricin in Frist's office was a stark reminder that "the next real one is around the corner. You know it's coming. This is a place that knows it's a bull's-eye."

In the fall of 2001, after anthrax-laced letters killed five people, including two Washington postal workers, and sickened 17 others, the pace was much more hectic. The squad was inundated with thousands of calls about suspected anthrax. Some were handled by phone, Rice said.

A typical call, he said, was the one he got from a person who said something to the effect: "There's white powder. I'm scared to death."

"Where is it?" Rice asked.

"Next to the doughnuts."

"Can you describe it?"

"It looks like the white powder on the doughnuts"

"Well, have you had some of your doughnuts?"

"Yeah."

"It's your sugar."

Not all cases are solved so easily. On March 2, for example, six FBI agents at the postal facility at National Airport were puzzled by the dry, green substance that spewed from a package.

"The powder was everywhere. It got on other mail. It got on the floor," recalled one of the agents, who spoke on the condition that his name not be used.

"I was sitting on the scene thinking: 'If we can't explain this away, cancel my dinner reservations. This is not going to make a lot of people happy. It's going to be a long night, and it's going to become a much bigger deal.' "

The airport fire department conducted field tests, which turned out negative. But because field tests are not regarded as foolproof, the squad went a step further.

Two agents went to an apartment on 16th Street NW, to which the package was addressed. A man answered the door. He seemed a little surprised to see the FBI, one agent recalled. "Yes," he said, he was expecting a package from relatives in Ethiopia and explained that the product, made of ground-up peas, was used to season sauteed vegetables and chicken.

Complicating their work, agents said, it is not uncommon for hazmat squads to get false positives for dangerous substances in field tests.

On Nov. 6, field tests conducted by a private contractor showed traces of anthrax spores at the mail-sorting facility at Anacostia Naval Station. Consequently, postal officials closed 11 mail-handling and post offices in the Washington area the next day. But subsequent tests at the Naval Medical Research Center in Silver Spring were negative.

Other cities with high numbers of false alarms for hazardous substances are New York, Los Angeles, Detroit, Chicago and Birmingham, the FBI said.

FBI agent Stephen Fogarty of the Joint Terrorism Task Force in Washington, who has responded to many scares, said: "We go to so many that a lot of times you think, 'Not another one.' I think sometimes you have to be cognizant that we may see all these strange things every day" but the public does not.

Authorities sometimes take extra precautions such as evacuating buildings, as they did at Union Station on April 5 when someone spotted an unattended backpack that smelled of petroleum. Inside was a leaking can of lighter fluid.

In most instances, the local police or fire departments decide which streets to close or which buildings to evacuate, sometimes with advice from the FBI. Agents say the measures may inconvenience the public. But they say the security steps are necessary.

Rice said he sees no end in sight to the false alarms.

"People are worried," he said. "People are scared because they see Madrid on the news. They see what goes on. They see stuff in Pakistan."
 


© 2004 The Washington Post Company

Monday, April 26, 2004

Letter, white powder force IRS office evacuation

By Jim Patten
Staff Writer

ANDOVER -- Threatening letters containing white powder were received at three Internal Revenue Service processing centers across the country yesterday, including the local center, fire officials said.

The letter forced the evacuation of the building off Route 133 in Andover for four hours and an employee who had direct contact with the powder had to be hosed down with mild soap and water, said Deputy Fire Chief James Dolan.

"One person was directly exposed and was decontaminated at the scene," Dolan said. "He was a little anxious."

The letter contained an expression of profanity and the sentence, "You are murderers in Iraq." Similar letters were received at IRS processing centers in Fresno, Calif., and Kansas City, Mo., and were fictitiously signed by Los Angeles Mayor James K. Hahn.

The District 6 Hazardous Materials Team took samples of the powder for testing. Investigators also bagged up the desk and chair the man used and removed them from the area, Dolan said.

Workers were allowed to return to the area following the incident, Dolan said.

Alarm over 'anthrax letter'

3 October 2003

AMSTERDAM The fire brigade was called out in force on Friday after staff at a currency manufacturer in Haarlem received a suspect letter possibly containing Anthrax.

The alert was raised at the company Joh. Enschede at about 2.20pm and about 10 fire trucks were dispatched to the scene, a nu.nl news report said.

The immediate vicinity was sealed off and the involved staff were quarantined. The suspect envelope was being examined to determine if it contains anthrax.

A police spokeswoman said it was not yet certain whether the package contained anthrax, admitting the incident could also be a "terrible, misplaced joke".

After the September 11 attacks in 2001, five people died and 17 were injured in the US when anthrax in powder form was sent through the mail, sparking global fears of biological terror attacks.

Envelopes with white powder soon started arriving in mailboxes right across the globe, including the Netherlands. Most were found to be harmless and Dutch authorities prosecuted several people for sending "joke" anthrax letters.

A Dutch marine stationed in Iraq on peacekeeping duties caused alarm in September when he sent a letter home to a 22-year-old friend in Gorinchem, near Rotterdam. The marine had placed a piece of Iraqi "souvenir" stuccowork in the letter, but it had been crushed to powder in the mail.

Authorities decided against prosecuting the marine due to lack of evidence indicating intent.

[Copyright Expatica News 2003]

Subject: Dutch news

Midwest City Hall Evacuated After Anthrax Scare

Substance Sent To Health Department

POSTED: 11:25 a.m. CDT October 6, 2003

UPDATED: 11:29 a.m. CDT October 6, 2003

 

MIDWEST CITY, Okla.

 

-- Midwest City workers were evacuated Monday following an anthrax scare.

 

 

Officials said an employee at Midwest City Hall opened a letter and white powder spilled out.

 

Hazardous materials crews were called out to clean it up. The workers were evacuated from the building for about 30 minutes.

 

 

The powder was sent to the Oklahoma Department of Health to see if the substance is dangerous.

 

The woman who opened the powder was not injured, officials said.

 

 

Copyright 2003 by ChannelOklahoma.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

 

 

'Anthrax letter' false alarm

6 October 2003

AMSTERDAM The suspect letter sent to printing company Joh. Enschede in Haarlem last week was probably not contaminated with anthrax, initial tests have revealed.

An alert was raised at the company at about 2.20pm on Friday and about 10 fire trucks were dispatched to the scene after staff opened an envelope that contained a suspicious powder. The immediate vicinity was sealed off and the five involved staff members were isolated and cleaned. Eight fire fighters in protective clothing wrapped the suspicious envelope in plastic and removed it from the building.

But preliminary tests conducted at research lab ID-Lelystad revealed on Friday night that the suspect envelope did not contain traces of biological material and was thus probably not contaminated with anthrax, Dutch associated press ANP reported.

After the September 11 attacks in 2001, five people died and 17 were injured in the US when anthrax in powder form was sent through the mail, sparking global fears of biological terror attacks.

Envelopes with white powder soon started arriving in mailboxes right across the globe, including the Netherlands. Most were found to be harmless and Dutch authorities prosecuted several people for sending "joke" anthrax letters.

A Dutch marine stationed in Iraq on peacekeeping duties caused alarm in September when he sent a letter home to a 22-year-old friend in Gorinchem, near Rotterdam. The marine had placed a piece of Iraqi "souvenir" stuccowork in the letter, but it had been crushed to powder in the mail.

Authorities decided against prosecuting the marine due to lack of evidence indicating intent.

[Copyright Expatica News 2003]

 

Posted 2/16/2003 12:15 PM     Updated 2/16/2003 2:17 PM


Anthrax scare closes N.J. post office
LONG HILL TOWNSHIP, N.J. (AP) — Authorities in New Jersey, where at least five anthrax-laden letters were mailed in 2001, closed another post office after brown powder fell from a package containing a threatening letter.

An initial test was negative for anthrax, but a secondary test was inconclusive, Postal Service spokesman Tony Esposito said Sunday.

One employee came in contact with the powder but didn't appear to have symptoms, and five workers in the building were given prescriptions for the antibiotic Cipro, Esposito said. He said the post office was closed, pending tests results expected Tuesday from the state health department.

The substance was discovered Friday night when a postmark machine stamped a padded envelope addressed to an eastern Pennsylvania residence and the powder spilled out, Esposito said. He wouldn't say what town the letter was destined for.

New Jersey became a focus of anthrax fears in 2001, when tainted letters stamped with Trenton postmarks were sent to NBC news anchor Tom Brokaw, the New York Post and the Washington, D.C., offices of Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle and Sen. Patrick Leahy. Five people died and 13 others were sickened in anthrax attacks.

The FBI has yet to name a suspect, though officials say there are about 30 "persons of interest."

The post office closed Saturday is about 45 miles north of Trenton.


Copyright 2003 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

FBI Probes Powder Sent to Gore
NewsMax.com Wires
Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2002
WASHINGTON – Federal officials are investigating as an "anthrax hoax case" a white powder mailed Tuesday to the Tennessee office of former Vice President Al Gore, Fox News Channel reported.

"A hazardous materials team was on the scene at Gore's 'Leadership '02' PAC in Nashville after office manager Mary Patterson opened an envelope with the morning mail that contained the substance," Fox News reported.

The envelope had a stamp on the back that said, "This Letter Has Not Been Examined By the Tennessee Department of Corrections." Tennessee officials confirmed that outgoing mail from state prisons receive such stamps when they have not been opened by prison officials. Gore was not present in the office, which has been sealed and quarantined, but staffers were exposed to the powder. Jano Cabrerra, Gore's Washington spokesman, confirmed that the former vice president was vacationing on the West Coast.

After Patterson opened the letter, Gore Chief of Staff Robert McLarty sealed the office, turned off the air-conditioning unit and called the Hazardous Materials Unit of the Nashville Fire Department. McLarty and Patterson have been released from quarantine and have been tested for exposure to anthrax.

The Loews Vanderbilt Hotel, which houses Gore's political action committee on the seventh floor, did not evacuate the entire building. HazMat investigators were performing field tests to determine whether the power contains any dangerous biological or chemical agents.

"No one has been transported because of medical reasons, and no suspects have been identified," said Jon Stephens, spokesman for the FBI in Nashville.

Diane Fenton of the Tennessee Health Department said the specimens from the letter have been received at the state lab. She was uncertain if a field test had been conducted, but she said those are generally considered unreliable. The health department is conducting tests on the letter now for anthrax and other biological agents and it will take 48 hours before they have definitive results.

Last fall, a series of letters addressed to media and political figures contained a powdered form of anthrax bacteria that killed five and sickened 13, while forcing the long-term evacuation and sealing of a postal facility and portions of the U.S. Capitol complex. No suspect has been identified in those attacks, and no arrests have been made.

After those letters were received, a host of false anthrax threats was made around the country.

Copyright 2002 by United Press International.

ANTHRAX HOAXES | ANTHRAX HOAXES II | ANTHRAX HOAXES III - JEWISH ORGANIZATIONS | ANTHRAX HOAXES IV | ANTHRAX HOAXES V - POSTAL FACILITIES | ANTHRAX HOAXES VI - EUROPE | ANTHRAX HOAXES VII - LAWMAKERS | ANTHRAX HOAXES VIII - SEATTLE | CHRONOLOGIES | ANTHRAX IN THE MAIL
















 
 
 

ANTHRA HOAXES

 

anthraxusa.jpg

Thursday, September 25

Powder in letter leads to lockdown of Atlantis hospital

By Connie Piloto, Palm Beach Post Staff Writer
Thursday, September 25, 2003

ATLANTIS -- A letter containing a suspicious white powder forced the closing of JFK Medical Center for about 30 minutes at midday Wednesday.

A hospital secretary discovered the powder about noon while opening a letter that had been mailed to her residence.

"It was her personal mail and was addressed to her," said Dr. Larry Bush, JFK's chairman of infectious diseases. "She was a little disturbed."

Patients were not exposed, and Bush said no one showed signs of illness or reported feeling sick.

The letter was turned over to authorities. Late Wednesday, the Palm Beach County Health Department told hospital officials the powder was not a hazardous substance. Madelyn Passarella, vice president of marketing at JFK, said final test results are to be released today.

Although the substance was not an infectious agent, "You have to treat these things as if they were," said Bush, who diagnosed anthrax in a Lantana-area man who was taken to JFK and was the first to die in the anthrax attacks of 2001.

The secretary, whose name was not released, called her supervisor after finding the substance, and hospital officials initiated a lockdown. "We diverted ambulances to other hospitals," Passarella said.

Patients who drove to the hospital in need of emergency care were allowed inside and treated.

The sheriff's office hazardous materials team and the FBI were dispatched to the hospital.

The secretary and about five other employees in the room followed decontamination procedures.

connie_piloto@pbpost.com


White powder in letter to SRP being analyzed

Sept. 16, 2003 09:34 PM

Authorities are investigating a suspicious letter that contained white powder and a page of Arabic writing when it was opened Tuesday by a Salt River Project employee.

Sgt. Dan Masters, a Tempe police spokesman, said the Tempe Fire Department decontaminated 12 employees after authorities were called at about 3 p.m. when the white powder leaked out at SRP's credit department.

Masters said the Arabic writing appeared to come from a book or magazine. He said the state Department of Public Safety was collecting the evidence and hoped to analyze the substance by midnight.

SRP will notify employees about whether the substance poses a health threat, Masters said. There were no health-related complaints Tuesday afternoon.

The Maricopa County Health Department and the FBI also are investigating.

bargray.gif

Suspicious Powder Found In Envelope Sent To Law Firm

LAST UPDATE: 9/2/2003 11:11:37 PM
Posted By: Carly Miller


 

San Antonio police are investigating what could turn into a federal case.

Someone sent an envelope with a suspicious powder inside to a San Antonio law firm.

An employee at Pat Maloney's office on West Woodlawn opened the envelope, and white powder fell out.

A hazardous materials crew was called, but the powder turned out to be harmless.

The person responsible could face a federal prison sentence for sending something threatening through the mail.

bargray.gif

 
 

 

 

 

08-29-2003: news-update

 

 

GF mail carriers decontaminated after powder found in letters

By The Associated Press

 

GRAND FORKS - Two mail carriers here were taken to a hospital for decontamination after letters containing a suspicious powder turned up on separate mail routes.

 

Grand Forks Postmaster Gary Lemieux said the carriers spent about two hours at the hospital yesterday and checked out fine after tests. Their names weren't available.

 

"We just sent them in for precautionary reasons," Lemieux said. "The people that looked into it said there should be no worry."

 

Two Grand Forks businesses told the post office on Thursday that they received letters containing a powdery substance.

 

Lemieux declined to name the businesses.

 

The Grand Forks Police Department expected to assign the case to an investigator on Friday. The two letters were sent away for tests.

 

Lemieux said it's the third such incident for Grand Forks Post Office officials in about two years.

 

"You don't ever get used to it, but you don't get as shook up about it," he said.

 

 

         *************************

 

 

News: Casper | Wyoming | National

 

Suspicious letters deemed not threatening

 

scfonho

 

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) - Suspicious letters mailed to the State Penitentiary and at least seven probation and parole offices around Wyoming were not meant as threats, officials said Friday.

 

One of the letters contained white powder - not two as originally reported - and all contained pamphlets about an Islamic school on the East Coast that authorities believe may be part of a mass mailing, said Kelly Ruiz, spokeswoman for the state Office of Homeland Security.

 

''The letters weren't threatening,'' she said.

 

The envelope containing powder was mailed to the parole and probation office in Douglas, though first responders found no powder upon examination. It was being tested at the state Public Health Laboratory, with preliminary results expected late Friday.

 

Authorities initially reported the powder had also been sent to an office in Riverton, but authorities later determined that did not occur.

 

''What happened was they responded to it just the same way because of the report in Douglas,'' Ruiz said. ''There was no powder in the envelope.''

 

Letters were also sent to the probation and parole offices in Sheridan, Cheyenne, Torrington, Casper and the Wyoming State Penitentiary in Rawlins. The Worland office received two separate letters, and many of the mailings arrived over a couple days.

 

A 10th letter sent to the Green River office was being investigated Friday, Ruiz said.

 

Wyoming Department of Corrections spokeswoman Melinda Brazzale said no letters had been reported at the state's other correctional facilities as of Friday morning.

 

Police in Douglas decontaminated several people who may have been exposed to the powder after it was discovered and blocked off the area.

 

Initial testing showed no signs of a biological or chemical danger, and no one had been hospitalized, officials said.

 

In Sheridan, police triple-sealed their letter with plastic before shipping it for testing. The mailing arrived at the office two days before local authorities were notified.

 

The FBI was investigating, with assistance from state and local officials.

 

FBI spokeswoman Ann Atanacio and officials at the probation and parole offices referred all comment to the Office of Homeland Security.

 

AP-WS-08-29-03 1231EDT

 

 

      ***********************

 

 

August 29, 2003

 

Last modified August 29, 2003 - 1:00 am

 

 

Suspicious powder mailed to probation officers

 

CHEYENNE -- Suspicious letters -- including two containing some sort of powder -- arrived by mail Thursday at the State Penitentiary and seven probation and parole offices around Wyoming.

 

State officials said the two envelopes containing powder were mailed to the probation and parole offices in Riverton and Douglas.

 

Letters were also sent to the probation and parole offices in Sheridan, Cheyenne, Worland, Torrington, Casper and the Wyoming State Penitentiary in Rawlins.

 

 

All seven envelopes contained literature related to an Islamic school on the East Coast, according to Lara Azar, spokeswoman for Gov. Dave Freudenthal.

 

State officials said the letters and contents would be tested for chemical or radiological contamination and then taken by the Wyoming Highway Patrol to the state Public Health Laboratory for testing.

 

Everyone exposed to the letters was undergoing medical evaluation.

 

In a release, Gov. Dave Freudenthal said the incidents would be treated with "utmost caution" until all questions are answered.

 

The FBI, which was the lead agency in the case, and state and local officials were investigating. Azar said the mailings were being considered as a "criminal act."

 

Anyone with information was urged to contact police.

 

 

 

Copyright © The Billings Gazette,

 

 

 

                     ***************

 

 

This story is from our news.com.au network

 

 

White powder sent to Beattie

 

26aug03

 

POLICE are investigating two parcels containing white powder posted to Queensland Premier Peter Beattie's office.

 

The first parcel arrived at the Executive Building in inner-city Brisbane yesterday and a second arrived today.

 

Mr Beattie told reporters today he did not normally reveal such matters, but wanted to urge whoever was behind them to stop it.

 

"I know people feel touchy about a whole range of issues," Mr Beattie said.

 

"I don't know the basis of this and I'm not making allegations or aspersions I just say to people, whoever's doing it, stop it."

 

 

 

 

 

 

The premier, whose departmental officers open his daily mail, could not give any details of who the parcels were addressed to or what substance they included, but confirmed no-one was injured.

 

"I am a bit annoyed about it," Mr Beattie said.

 

"If you don't like me, fine, or the government we are big enough and ugly enough to deal with these things.

 

"But when those letters get sent in, all they do is scare the hell out of hard-working public servants and it wastes money and resources."

 

Mr Beattie said if an offender could be identified from the parcel he expected they would be charged.

 

"People need to understand this is a serious offence," Mr Beattie said.

 

"I am not going to stand for people who are public servants, who are employees of the community, going through this sort of trial and tribulation."

 

Mr Beattie's office has previously been targeted with similar packages.

 

The discovery of those packages followed the anthrax scare in the United States in 2001, when envelopes containing anthrax were sent to numerous organisations, killing five people and injuring 13 more.

 

 THE WORLD


This story is from our news.com.au network

Source: AFP

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anthrax panic over package



A PUBLISHING house in the Turkish capital raised an alarm over anthrax today after receiving a package from Australia which contained a suspicious white powder, but the substance appeared to be harmless, the police said.

Security forces and health officials wearing protective gear quarantined the Bilgi publishing house for a while, sparking panic in the heart of
Ankara.

"The situation has now returned to normal after initial examination showed that the powder is not harmful ... It seems to be a kind of protective powder against humidity," a police official said, adding the definite result will be known after 48 hours.

The powder had been sprinkled between the pages of a book in the package.

A second publishing house, Dost, received a similar package, but police took it away before it was opened.

 

 

 

Times Of Oman >> International News >> US State Department in anthrax scare

Tuesday, August 19, 2003

 

 

US State Department in anthrax scare


WASHINGTON Field tests on a suspicious white powder that sparked a brief anthrax scare at the US State Department have determined that the substance is not harmful, officials said yesterday.

The powder was found in a letter addressed to Secretary of State Colin Powell but spokesman Richard Boucher noted that even if it had been hazardous it would not likely have done any damage as all mail to the department is irradiated.

The mail had been irradiated, thus rendering it harmless prior to its arrival at the departments mail facility, he told reporters. Boucher said further testing would still be required to determine the exact nature of the powder, but stressed that preliminary tests were not showing any positive indications of hazardous materials.

The discovery of the powder had forced the limited closure of the departments Office of Public Communications and prompted as well as a shut-down of the ventilation system in the area of the office.

An announcement made over the departments public address system said a suspicious piece of mail that contains an unknown white powder had been discovered in the office.

Shortly after the
September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in the United States, letters containing anthrax bacteria were received by US news organisations and lawmakers, killing five people.

The State Department, which handled one of those letters that had been misrouted to its main mail facility, temporarily shut down its diplomatic pouch service after traces of anthrax were found at several of its overseas missions. One department employee, who worked at the off-site facility, was infected with the bacteria but recovered.

Since then, all incoming mail to the department, as well as other
US government agencies, has been irradiated although discoveries of white powder still prompt thorough investigations.

The last such anthrax scare is believed to have occurred in October 2002 when a suspicious white powder was found in an envelope at the departments Office of Childrens Services.

Test on that powder also came back negative for anthrax. AFP

 

 

 

 


Anthrax probes routine for FBI


By Matthew Cella
THE WASHINGTON TIMES


    FBI officials say an envelope containing a suspicious white powder discovered Monday at the U.S. State Department was one of at least four that had been sent from a San Diego address by someone identifying themselves as the "French Chef." 


    The letter, addressed to Secretary of State Colin L. Powell, was discovered at about 9:40 a.m. in the Office of Public Communications.
    The FBI quickly determined that the powder was harmless, but the investigation closed part of the second floor of the department for about two hours. 


    FBI officials with the Washington Field Office say they respond to at least a half-dozen such hoax letters each week, including one received yesterday at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. That letter was traced quickly to a Michigan prisoner who had sent more than two dozen others. 


    "We get a half a dozen of these things at a minimum each week," said Jim Rice, the supervisory special agent in charge of the National Capital Response Squad for the FBI's D.C. Field Office.


    John Perren, assistant special agent in charge for domestic terrorism at the FBI's D.C. Field Office, said the bureau responds to every call.


    "We cannot afford not to respond to every incident we get a call about," he said. "We respond to these presuming it's an act of terrorism."


    Mr. Rice said the most common contents of such envelopes are salt, sugar, yeast and talcum powder.


    "Even if it's not anthrax, even if it's just talcum powder, it's still a crime," he said, adding that the suspicious contents of one envelope turned out to be a dietary fiber supplement. "That was my favorite."


    Mr. Rice said agents responding to such calls determine whether the threat is critical, if any other suspicious items had been sent to the recipient, and what action to take.


    "Our job is to investigate, to go to the scene and process the evidence," Mr. Perren said.


    Officials say the proper response to receiving an envelope with suspicious contents is to call 911. The FBI field office works closely with the Metropolitan Police Department and the D.C. Fire and Emergency Medical Services, whose hazardous materials team handles decontamination operations.


    Mr. Rice said the fire department was not called about the incident Monday because the envelope was intercepted by the State Department's internal hazardous materials team and FBI agents were able to determine that the letter was not a threat.


    "We knew from intelligence that we were going in to pick up something we had seen at least four times," Mr. Rice said.
    He said the fire department's special-operations unit is briefed weekly on threatening situations and frequently participates in tabletop exercises and live drills.


    "We never want to meet our partners for the first time in a crisis," Mr. Rice said, adding that federal and local coordination of response capabilities in the D.C. area is five to 10 years ahead of other jurisdictions.


    The level of reports about suspicious mail is nowhere near that of a three-day period in 2001 when agents responded to 1,435 calls.


    In October that year, several letters containing anthrax spores were mailed through a New Jersey postal center to news outlets and political offices in New York, Florida and the District. Anthrax-laced letters also were sent to the offices of Sen. Tom Daschle of South Dakota and Sen. Patrick J. Leahy of Vermont, both Democrats. 


    The attacks killed five persons, including two workers at the
Brentwood mail facility in Northeast that handled the letters. Anthrax infections sickened 23 others.
    

 

 

Powder at State Dept. not anthrax

 

Staff temporarily quarantined as authorities searched building

 


MSNBC AND NBC NEWS

 

 

WASHINGTON, Aug. 19 A white powder mailed to Secretary of State Colin Powell that led to employees being briefly quarantined at the State Department was not anthrax, tests showed Tuesday.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       THE BUILDING was sealed off and staffers were confined to their offices Monday morning after a worker in the Office of Public Liaison opened the letter near the room where department spokesmen brief reporters.
       While tests for hazardous materials were negative, the incident revived memories of the series of anthrax-laced letters sent to news organizations, government offices and lawmakers shortly after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Five people were killed by the substances in those letters, one of which was mailed to the State Department.
       Officials told NBC News that the letter had been irradiated before it was delivered, as is the case with all outside mail sent to government offices after the earlier anthrax mailings.
       No staffers reported any ill effects, and they were released from quarantine early Monday afternoon. Officials said they would not be treated with the antibiotic ciprofloxacine.
       Powell, who is on vacation, was not in the building.
       
       By NBCs Tammy Kupperman and MSNBC.coms Alex Johnson.
       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Powder Sent to State Dept. Harmless

 

 

By Associated Press

August 18, 2003, 8:39 PM EDT

WASHINGTON -- White powder found in an envelope mailed to the State Department proved to be harmless, a spokesman said Monday.

The letter was irradiated under procedures established after an outbreak of mailings of deadly anthrax spores two years ago, department spokesman Richard Boucher said. It was addressed to Secretary of State Colin Powell and received in an office of the Bureau of Public Affairs.

FBI agents were summoned and the area on the second floor of the State Department building was cordoned off for two hours.

Copyright © 2003, The Associated Press

 

Posted on Thu, Aug. 14, 2003

Powder is found in letter to mayor

The substance was probably coffee creamer, officials said. The incident, the 2d in two weeks, closed part of City Hall.

By Anthony S. Twyman

Inquirer Staff Writer

 

Philadelphia police and the FBI are trying to determine who sent a letter to the Mayor's Office that contained a white powdery substance authorities first feared could have been dangerous, but now believe was merely nondairy coffee creamer.

 

Two clerks in Mayor Street's office, who were on the first floor of City Hall in the mailroom, discovered the letter yesterday morning while opening the mail, officials said.

 

No one was injured, but the letter's contents spilled onto the pants of one of the workers, city officials said.

 

Preliminary tests indicated the substance was less than half a gram of coffee creamer.

 

"It came up with an 86 percent probability that that substance was a nondairy coffee creamer," said Robert Marchisello, battalion chief of the city's hazardous-materials unit, during a news conference.

 

A definitive identification of the substance is expected within the next two days, officials said.

 

Police cordoned off the northeast side of City Hall and quarantined the mailroom, Room 110, for several hours.

 

"This is the kind of thing that we have to take seriously," Street said.

 

Authorities would not identify the secretaries. But KYW-AM (1060) interviewed one of the women and identified her as Irene Coard.

 

Police would not reveal the written contents of the letter or whether there was a return address because, they said, the incident is under investigation.

 

"There is what we consider to be sufficient evidence to investigate this as a federal crime - threats through the mail specifically," said Inspector Robert Grasso of the Police Department's counterterrorism unit.

 

Authorities had the two secretaries take showers and change their clothing as a precaution, according to Esther Chernak, a staff physician with the city's Health Department.

 

Street praised the two workers for following the protocols the city instituted after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He said they turned off the air-conditioning and immediately notified security.

 

The incident was the second to occur in two weeks at a municipal office.

 

On Aug. 6, a white, powdery substance was discovered by workers checking the mail in a records room on the third floor of the city's Criminal Justice Center near City Hall, according to two employees who asked not to be identified.

 

The city's Sheriff's Office was notified and handled the incident, in which no one was injured. One of the employees said the letter to the Criminal Justice Center appeared to have been mailed by an inmate.

 

The mayor's press office and the Sheriff's Office confirmed that incident last night.

 

Luz Cardenas, a mayoral spokeswoman, said the incident had been reported to the Police Department's counterterrorism unit and would be investigated.

 

Cardenas said city officials were unaware of the incident until a reporter brought it to their attention yesterday because "it was not reported through the proper channels, which is to call 911." But Pat West, a spokeswoman for the Sheriff's Office, disagreed, saying "that information is definitely incorrect because the Police Department was duly notified."

 

 

 

 

Officials: Powder Found At City Hall Not A Threat

Hazmat Team Called To City Hall

 

POSTED: 11:53 a.m. EDT August 13, 2003

UPDATED: 8:39 p.m. EDT August 13, 2003

 

Story by nbc10.com

 

-- A powdery substance found inside a threatening letter addressed to Philadelphia Mayor John Street triggered a scare and evacuation at City Hall.

 

[City Hall Hazmat] Investigators said that about 10 a.m. Wednesday, Irene Chord, a secretary for the mayor, opened a letter and a white powdery substance fell all over her lap.

 

Within minutes, hazmat and fire crews rushed to the scene to test and examine the suspicious envelope. The letter was reportedly a standard business size and it was folded in a way that could have allowed it to contain the powder.

 

"I say there was less than a half of a gram of the powder," said Robert Marchisello of the Philadelphia fire department.

 

Sources told NBC 10 News that, in addition to the white powder in the envelope, there was also a threatening letter addressed to the mayor. The Federal Bureau of Investigation is investigating the letter.

 

"I am a federal official now for almost 25 years and live with the risk associated with a high profile, very visible official," Street said.

 

The mayor also said his secretary followed post-9/11 protocol in checking all mail carefully by immediately turning off the air conditioner and phoning police. Chord and her co-worker said they do not wear gloves when opening the mail. The first floor of City Hall was cordoned off near the mailroom.

 

Hazmat and the Philadelphia fire department then moved in to investigate the powdery substance with a series of three tests.

 

"They came up with an 86 percent probability that that the substance was a non-dairy coffee creamer," said Inspector Robert Graffo, Philadelphia's terrorism expert.

 

Graffo would not talk about the return address of the envelope, the warning or the person who allegedly sent it.

 

The mailroom is now under guard. Authorities said there is sufficient evidence to investigate the letter as a federal crime.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mysterious White Powder Forces Evacuation at SPLC       

 

08/13/2003     Cynthia Milledge

   

 Several employees at the Southern Poverty Law Center in Montgomery got the scare of their lives Wednesday morning when a mysterious envelope containing a white powder was discovered.

 

SPLC President Joe Levin told CBS 8 News that the employee who opened the envelope also found a threatening letter inside. Levin says they evacuated the entire third floor of the building and called police and the fire department.

 

District Fire Chief Keith Raybon says a crew put the suspicious package into bio hazard bags and turned it over to the FBI.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Substance Found at LaGuardia is Powder

 

<http://www.nynewsday.com/images/icons/email.gif> Email this story

<http://www.nynewsday.com/images/icons/printer.gif> Printer friendly format

 

 

The Associated Press

 

August 12, 2003, 1:30 PM EDT

 

Three tickets counters at LaGuardia Airport were closed for a few hours this morning after the discovery of an unknown substance, authorities said.

 

The material was later identified as talcum powder, said Alan Hicks, a Port Authority spokesman.

 

Port Authority officials said the powder was discovered at about 5:30 a.m. at the counters of ATA, AirTrans and Spirit airlines, each at the airport's Central Terminal.

 

The counters were closed while Port Authority police were called in to investigate. The substance was taken to the city health department for examination.

 

The Central Terminal was never closed, and no evacuation took place, officials said.

 

The counters were reopened, and nobody needed medical attention, Hicks said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

White powder found in letter addressed to MP

 

Stuff.co.nz, New Zealand - Aug 8, 2003

 

Court evacuated in powder alert

 

A magistrates court was evacuated on Wednesday morning after the discovery of a suspect package.

 

The alarm was raised at Guildford Magistrates Court in Surrey at about 0900 BST just as court proceedings for the day were about to start.

 

An envelope containing an unidentified white powder had been delivered to the court building.

 

Ten people who may have come into contact with the package were taken to hospital for checks but were later sent home.

 

Substance analysed

 

On Wednesday afternoon Surrey Police said they had ruled out terrorist involvement.

 

A spokeswoman for Surrey Police said; "At this stage this incident is not believed to be terrorist related.

 

"The substance has been seized and is currently being analysed."

 

Emergency services were called to the scene along with members of Surrey Police's special Chemical, Biological and Radiological Team.

 

The spokesman said the police had applied utmost caution in dealing with the package to ensure the safety of the public and to maximise forensic opportunities to analyse the substance.

 

Prisoners in custody who had been due to appear before magistrates at the court were returned to their cells.

 

The court is expected to remain closed for several days.

 

 

 

 

 

White powder found in letter addressed to MP

09 August 2003

 

A parliamentary office was evacuated this morning after a staff member found white powder in a letter addressed to an MP.

 

The office was closed for more than an hour until police gave the all clear and took the substance away for testing.

 

Parliamentary Service building manager John McPadden would not identify the MP.

 

Inspector Bruce Blayney of the diplomatic protection squad said he hoped to have test results by Monday.

 

Police had no suspects and the letter contained no return address.

 

Operations in the rest of the building were unaffected.

 

 

 

 

Suspicious powder closes police headquarters

Wyoming News, WY - Aug 2, 2003

Until it was determined the powder was harmless, police headquarters

and the surrounding area were closed off for a couple of hours.

 

 

 

Suspicious Powder Clears IRS Office

Employees Open Threatening Letters Containing Borax

 

POSTED: 5:24 p.m. PDT July 22, 2003

UPDATED: 5:43 p.m. PDT July 22, 2003

SAN DIEGO -- Internal Revenue Service workers were escorted out of their offices at the San Diego federal building after a suspicious letter was opened.

 

The third floor was evacuated after employees opened a threatening letter containing two tablespoons of white powder.

 

Employees who were exposed to the powder were taken to the second floor, where hazardous material teams tested the chemical. Tests revealed the substance was Borax, a laundry detergent.

 

The FBI said the IRS has received some other questionable letters, including photocopied 1040 tax forms with messages on them. They also received a threatening telephone message.

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                               

 

                           


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Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax spores silane Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax

Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax  Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax

Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax B’nai B’rith Wassington dc 1997

Berry Berry Berry Berry md MD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax freerepublic the great satan

Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax  Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax goetz anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax

Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax victor investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax

 Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax

Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax  Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax

Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax

 

Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax

Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax  Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax

Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax Steven hatfill anthrax investigation fbi anthrax anthrax anthrax

 

Berry Berry Berry Berry  Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft Ashcroft

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

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