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Native Issues
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Makah | Mendot |  Nebraska State Police | Peltier
| Pine Ridge News
Pine Ridge Help | South Dakota | In Memory of |
Our Canadian Neighbors
Front Page or Contents
****************
Native news ( December 1999)
Native News (November 1999)
Native News (October 1999)
Native Historicals, Page 1 (All Previous Dates)
Native Historicals, Page 2 (Sept. 1999)


 

The follow are different stories relating to issues that are pertinent to the Native American Community as a whole. Please when considering these stories realize that these are not imaginary tales nor the passing remnants of past ill's.

Native Indigenous Culture's issues are equally as critical to our species planetary survival or geo-political stability as the forced relocations of Kosovars, the continued extinquishment of the Tibet religious community or the destruction of the native eco-environment in the Amazon rain forest. Issues which of course attracted the predominant cultures attentions with relative ease.

These stories are of people and of communities that love, breathe, educate and desire what every other nation or people expect from those that rule and have authority over them. Simply what is fair, what is legal, what is right and what is owed.

The disenfranchisement of the native cultures has not abated nor has the rampant opportunism that eventually and continually undermines their attempts at acquiring parity. The playing field is not level and it is to that end the Ameri-Advocate strives, with every breath we take, to help level the playing field through advocacy, education and action.

Now is the time. To get the word out. To right the wrongs. To give back what was stolen. To pay rent on what's owed. To honor and act justly on the agreements we're committed to. Its time to make amends and begin again. A righteous future can await us if we can only awaken and act on it now.

If we dug up the graves in Kirksville Missouri to study what rural farmers were like in an era past and then placed them in museum's for everyone to "enjoy", I'd imagine there would be a few angry folks in town ready to string up the nut case who ever dreamed up such a sacrilegious and insidious act. Yet to this day, hundreds if not thousands of remains are disinterred and residing in NY and DC Museum's.

The fact that this kind of atrocity is entirely ignored by the media and for that matter , the predominant culture's population as a whole is exactly why the Ameri-Advocate has engaged this issue as its primary focus; namely to bring to the world the concept that Indigenous People are an integral, viable and vibrant component of our species. They deserve to be recognized and treated as such.

Lastly, for this reason, we will continue to bring the latest information and stories on these vital issues not only to the light of day but to the world as a whole, in full view.

Ellis Smith June 99'


 

*************

Seventh Circle Help

Thanks your correct in that it fell thru the cracks of mayhem.
With winter coming now would be a good time to start drives
to gather supplies and to get this guy on board to pick up and
deliever them.

ellis

  From: MissJoshua@aol.com

  Hi All! A few weeks ago, I sent this info to Ellis, but his pc blew up and
  then the onelist went down and well, you all know the rest. It must of got
  lost in the shuffle.
  Due to a family illness, I am not able to persue this at this time, but
  thought I'd shoot it through to see if anyone else could.
  A few weeks ago I talked to a trucker who lives in the apt. complex where I
  work. I told him about the donations waiting in PA for shipment to South
  Dakota. He was such a nice man, and gave me the number of his company (I
  beieve it's Roman-Haaus?)
  Anyway, he said they do this sort of thing all the time so here is the info:
  Robin Berry (it's a guy)
  1-800-321-4552
  East Coast Sales Division
  Can't beat an 800 #! If anyone can follow up on this, it'd be great!
Please  let me know......
  Peace and prayers,
  Lynny


The Seventh Circle

   When you enter Rapid City for the first time you are struck with images of industry, tourist
   attractions and gaming parlors. There are many new buildings and lots of things to do, without
   having to see the tragedies that occur beyond the glitz. Every winter people are dying of
   exposure and because they are Indian and hidden their fate means little to the general
   population. That must change.

   Winter is closing in fast and many people are not equipped withh the necessary clothing.
   Winter coats,clothes, gloves hatsand footgear along with socks are going to be desperately
   needed. Warm blankets and sleeping bags would also be appreciated. Check out the guest
   book for other needed items.

   With the extreme poverty of the Reservations, people come to the cities seeking a better life
   and are all too often left stranded. The cities are overwhelmed by the numbers of destitute
   people and often the shelters can not house everyone.
   People sleep in abandoned houses, cars, boxes, under bridges and anywhere they can find
   some shelter from the elements. Weather in the plains states can be brutal and even
   deadly. But weather is not the only killer of the people, apathy can be just as deadly, we need
   people to care enough to sacrifice what they can to help. This is an effort taking place in Rapid
   City, please read this page carefully and let your heart do the rest.

   All to often indigenous people are turned away from the homeless shelters in Rapid City, South
   Dakota because they have been drinking. During the bitter winter that is often a sentence of
   death. Alcohol decreases the body's ability to fight hypothermia and as a result they freeze to
   death. Until now their only option has been to seek shelter under bridges or in abandoned
   houses. They may survive another winter but the problem remains, they have little hope for
   anything better in their lives. The Seventh Circle is a non-profit organization, dedicated to
   providing the homeless of the Rapid City, S. Dakota area, with affordable housing , restoring
   dignity and giving them a foundation rooted in traditional culture. Although it is aimed at the
   Native American homeless the program will be open to all that are homeless. There are a few
   preconditions: 1.They must be willing to change destructive habits thru traditional methods
   and 2. They must be homeless at the time of their application, and 3. They must be willing to
   work within the community for everyone's benefit.


   The plan would provide the indigent not only with physical shelter, but with a caring
   community built around our Native traditional values, culture and religion. We believe that
   such a living and learning situation will be especially valuable for the most vulnerable of our
   people-- children living in poverty. Without such a cultural background, these children will
   have little chance to compete effectively in mainstream culture, with it, they will have the
   confidence to learn and master the skills that they will need to survive and prosper. The plan
   hinges upon obtaining the surplus military housing at the West Nike site near Ellsworth AFB, S.
   Dakota.

   And here is a statement from Rick Grey Buffalo Quinn, Founder of the Seventh Circle: The
   Seventh Circle is seeking urgently needed help from all generations and peoples. And as
   founder of the Seventh Circle, I am working with the homeless. Not only working with the
   homeless, but trying to replace things lost or stolen, by replacing homes to the homeless. And
   so I thank you.

   We are but a small voice crying in the wind. And again, we ask all mankind to help with our
   endeavors. Although I cannot come to you I pray my voice will. From the heart of the Dakota
   Nation, the housing that I will aquire will be called the "Leonard Peltier Housing Project", In
   the spirit of Crazy Horse, it is a dream of Leonard Peltier to provide housing for his people.
   Donations of food, clothing and desperately needed funds can be sent to:
   The Seventh Circle
   c/o Rick Grey Buffalo Quinn,
   321 Doolittle Street,
   Rapid City, S. Dakota 57701
   (605)355-9025 or
   605-390-2751
   For information via e-mail contact David
   Hendren at dhendren@mint.net

**************

Speak Out for Black Mesa!
          All Day Friday October 29, 1999 and
              All Day Monday November 1, 1999
                  Phone Calling, Faxing, Letter Writing:

  Please be polite, keep a copy and share any replies with ISCO!  Thank you.

              5:00 am- 2:00 pm Pacific Standard Time:

  Contact:        President Bill Clinton   (202) 456-1111
              The White House     (202) 456-2461 Fax
              1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
              Washington DC 20500  president@whitehouse.gov
              United States of America

  -- Ask him to issue an Executive Order forbidding any forced evictions of
  traditional Dine'h (Navajo) from the HPL in Arizona.  Remind him the next
  "deadline" is February 1, 2000.  Urge him to show his commitment to human
  rights here at home.  Suggest this is his opportunity to leave the legacy
  of his presidency by righting the wrongs against American Indians.

  Contact:        Asst. Attorney General Eric Holder
              United States Department of Justice
              PO Box 44378        (202) 514-2101
              Washington DC 20026 (202) 514-0467 Fax

              cc: Attorney General Janet Reno (address above)

  -- Ask Mr. Holder to *not* ask the US District Court for, nor enforce
  eviction notices for the Dine'h from the Hopi Partition Lands in
  northeastern Arizona.  Express your concern that the DOJ handle this
  non-violently, with sensitivity to the Elders and different culture of the
  Dine'h People.  The DOJ should halt any threatening actions against US
  citizens whose beliefs counter US policies that directly affect their
  children, such as the traditional Dine'h resisting forced relocation from
  the HPL (regardless of their "Accommodation Agreement" lease status).

  Regardless of any perceived land dispute between the Hopi and Navajo, or
  any settlement between the Hopi Tribe and United States, forced relocation
  continues to violate traditional Dine'h (Navajo) religious, civil and
  human rights.  Forcing Dine'h to sign leases to settle legal claims the
  Hopi Tribe has with the US is neither permanent or fair.  The US must be
  more "accommodating" in their problem solving and learn to stop bullying
  American Indians.  Remind him of the terrible outcome of their raid on the
  Branch Dividians at Waco, Texas and ask him to avoid another national
  tragedy!  Instead, the DOJ should protect the human rights of the Dine'h.


          For More Info:           isco@efn.org
          Indigenous Support Coalition of Oregon
          PO Box 11715 Eugene, OR 97440    (541) 683-2789

**********

Urgent Ward Valley alert   
   From: "Save Ward Valley" swv1@ctaz.com
  
   BREAKING NEWS! U.S. Government breaks promise to Native Nations and public to stop proposed Ward Valley Dump Project, betrays environment and tribes!
    California Governor Davis appoints nuclear industry-dominated committee to "study" issue. 
  
Call Tom Fry at the U.S. Interior Department --(202) 208-3801
      *  Tell the Interior Dept. it is unacceptable they have failed to terminate the Dump Project as promised

Call Governor Davis today -- (916) 445-2841  
        * Call Davis now!  Tell him that the public has no confidence in the biased task force and that the  people will stop the dump, no matter what it takes.
  
   TELL THE GOVERNMENT TO KEEP THEIR PROMISES AND STOP  THE DUMP NOW!
  
   In a disturbing turnabout and betrayal, both the federal government and
   Governor Gray Davis have broken their promises to stop the dump once
   and for all.  The Bureau of Land Management refuses to return the State's
   application for the land as promised, and Governor Davis has assembled a
   task force made up primarily of nuclear waste generators to determine
   the fate of Ward Valley.
  
   The first meeting of the Task Force will be November 17 at UCLA in Los
   Angeles.  Join hundreds of activists for a demonstration against the dump.
  
  
   VISIT THE GREENACTION WEBSITE FOR MORE DETAILS ON
   THIS ACTION ALERT
   http://www.greenaction.org

************

10-27-1999
Indigenous struggle continues in Latin America


MEXICO CITY (IPS)-Indigenous organizations throughout Latin America held a
variety of protests to commemorate the 507th anniversary of the arrival of
the Spaniards to the Americas.

The "Día de la Raza," "Día de Hispanidad," Columbus Day or Discoverers' Day
are just a few of the names used by governments on the American continent to
refer to October 12, a date that indigenous groups do not want to see
celebrated because to them it represents the start of exploitation and
oppression.

An estimated 75 million indigenous people died in the 16th and 17th
centuries in Latin America due to forced labor, wars and epidemics under
Spanish colonialism. And although they enjoy a greater political presence
today, a majority of the roughly 45 million indigenous members of 400 ethnic
groups found in the Americas, mainly in Bolivia, Ecuador, Peru, Guatemala
and Mexico, remain firmly in the grip of poverty and marginalization.

In a number of countries in the region, including Mexico, Peru, Guatemala,
Honduras and Ecuador, indigenous groups organized protest marches, arts
festivals and debates, demanding that their governments recognize the rights
of native groups to ownership of ancestral lands, autonomy and respect for
their culture and identity.

Honduras highlighted the various aspects of the continuing struggle waged by
indigenous people in Latin America.

A demonstration outside the presidential palace by around 5,000 indigenous
and Black protesters was broken up by the National Police using tear gas,
rubber bullets and batons. At least six demonstrators were injured.

Minister of the Presidency Gustavo Alfaro admitted that the protesters had
been granted a permit to march past the presidential palace. "We lament this
incident,'' he said.

Earlier, the demonstrators had successfully blocked a constitutional reform
project in the Honduran parliament, which would have authorized the sale of
public land in coastal and border areas for the development of tourist
projects.

Indigenous leader Salvador Zuniga said communities living in those areas
would be displaced by national and foreign investors if Congress approved
the proposed amendment.

The reform of article 107 of the constitution-which reserves for the state
property rights over, and bans the sale of, all land around the country's
coast and borders, as a means of defending national sovereignty-made it
through a first vote last year in Congress. But, it still must undergo
another vote.

However, the president of Congress, Rafael Pineda Ponce of the governing
Liberal Party, assured reporters that the amendment of article 107 had been
ruled out.

"Indigenous blood runs through my veins, and we must address the just
demands of our brothers,'' said Mr. Pineda Ponce, who added that he had
given instructions to pull the draft amendment off the legislative agenda.

The demonstration outside Congress was organized by the Civic Committee of
Indigenous Organizations and Blacks of Honduras, along with several
associations of subsistence-level farmers.

The protesters also called on the Ministry of Security to resolve the
murders of around a dozen indigenous leaders, killed in disputes over land
by gunmen hired by landowners and ranchers in western and northern Honduras.

Furthermore, they called on the National Agrarian Institute to speed up the
paperwork involved in granting indigenous groups titles to their land, and
to expedite the agrarian reform process.

Lastly, the demonstrators gathered outside the Supreme Court to protest a
legal ruling over land disputes and demand the release of imprisoned peasant
activists.

But the momentum felt throughout the region seven years ago seems to have
waned.

"The 12th of October is symbolic, but it is no longer a reference point, as
it was in 1992, for pushing for substantial changes in the situation of
indigenous peoples,'' said José del Val, director of the Inter-American
Indigenist Institute, an Organization of American States (OAS) agency based
in Mexico.

The 500th anniversary of the arrival of Christopher Columbus to the Americas
was marked by massive protest demonstrations, government pledges, the
awarding of the Nobel Peace prize to Guatemalan indigenous leader Rigoberta
Menchú, and the election of Víctor Hugo Cárdenas, a member of an indigenous
group, as vice- president of Bolivia.

Discussions in the Organization of American States (OAS) and the United
Nations on draft declarations on the rights of indigenous peoples were also
given a new impulse.

The draft declarations on the rights of indigenous peoples have been under
discussion in the OAS and UN for over 10 years. Analysts say the discussions
have been held up by the reluctance of governments to recognize the right to
autonomy of indigenous communities.

That reluctance could also explain the fact that only 10 countries in the
Americas have ratified International Labor Organization (ILO) Convention
169, which recognizes the rights of ethnic groups to the preservation of
their culture and territory.

********

         Wed, 27 Oct 1999
Feds Freeze Indian Tribe's Accounts
    
.c The Associated Press
 By PHIL ROONEY

SANTEE, Neb. (AP) - Federal prosecutors have frozen the
bank accounts of the Santee Sioux Tribe in an attempt to
shut down its casino.

U.S. Attorney Tom Monaghan said he intends to seize the
assets to help pay more than $1 million in fines the tribe
owes the government for operating its casino in defiance of
court orders.

``It's the first step in the collection process,'' he said
Tuesday. ``The tribe has not made any effort to pay those
court-ordered fines.''

Santee leaders said the money included federal funds
earmarked for health-care and social service programs.
None of the money was generated from the casino, tribal
chairman Butch Denny said.

``This is an attack on our elderly and children,'' Denny
said. ``We are not going to let him get away with this. We
are ready to fight.''

It was the latest development in a three-year effort by
state and federal officials to close the casino on the
Santee reservation near the South Dakota border in
northeast Nebraska.

The tribe opened the Ohiya Casino in 1996 even though
the
state refused to approve it. Casino-style gambling,
including slot machines, is illegal in Nebraska.

The Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 requires states to
negotiate agreements with tribes to set rules and limits on
gambling. The tribe sued the state, alleging it failed to
negotiate in good faith.

The tribe says the casino's 23 jobs are much needed on the
reservation - where the unemployment rate is 74 percent.

Neither the tribe or Monaghan knew exactly how much
money was in the frozen accounts at two banks.

A federal judge started fining the tribe $3,000 per day in
February for refusing to close the casino. The fine was
doubled in July. None of the fines have been paid.

Monaghan also seized about $87,000 from a Santee account in
South Dakota in 1997. The tribe responded by filing a lawsuit and
opening secret accounts.

************

October 27, 1999
Gratitude for Cooperation

I posted the Indigenous Peoples Statement on the Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights(TRIPS)Agreement of the WTO 'NO TO PATENTING OF LIFE'  paper last week I believe and even duped' notice of it on the ALT lists. 
The response was minimal.  Here we have Nepal's indigenous peoples jumping on board but the North American Indigenous peoples ignored it.  This is important.  The WTO is the World Trade Organization.  Rather then going after "twinkies", it would be far more beneficial to get this agreement passed in the WTO and thus protecting everyone's culture rather then attempting to go after them one by one on a miniscule basis.  The WTO meets in Seattle soon and if one truly wants to do something to protect native rights or go after twinkies,  THIS is the venue and the way to do so.

Ellis

From: NIPDISC, KATHMANDU, NEPAL
To: indig-csd List Member

October 27, 1999
Gratitude for Cooperation

Dear Beatri,

Thank you very much for enlisting to NIPDISC in the CSD Caucus list and sending regular information to update this organization about the Caucus's activities.

We appreciate the issues raised by the Caucus for discussion on are found of great important in protecting indigenous peoples' rights and freedoms of sustainable development.

I must also express my sincere gratitude for advising me to write an article about the indigenous peoples of Nepal. But, I am very sorry for not being
able to write it presently. Its due to my fixed program I am going to leave Kathmandu from tomorrow for Bhojpur to conduct consultation meetings concerning to NIPDISC's Indigenous Adult Education Programme piloting at
local level. After my retrieval from the field/village I will try in my best to write something about my peoples.

For my personal introduction; My name is Kripa Kirati. I was born in a remote village Dilpa, Bhojpur of eastern Nepal.I belong to Kirati tribe, who have their own oral religious tradition and distinct way of life than others. Linguistically,now the Kirati peoples are divided into near about 45 language groups. Among them my language group is Bantawa.The total number of the identified Kirati peoples (including the Limbus)is shown 675725(4 percent).

At these days I have been living in Kathmandu and working as the founder chairman of this 'Nepal Indigenous Peoples Development and Information Service Centre(NIPDISC) for the establishment' of this organization.

At the same time, I would also like to inform you that we have agreed to sign on the Indigenous Peoples Statement on the Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights(TRIPS)Agreement of the WTO 'NO TO PATENTING OF LIFE'. That was received through the email of BadMsgQ@ecouncil.ac.cr, but our response could not reach to the sender's address. So, should you please convey our gratitude to him/her who sent us the important document to sign on it.

Please, also be confirmed that your selection of Dedorah Mclaren as a co- facilitator for Tourism is welcomed by us too. We wish he would be successful in safeguarding the interest of indigenous peoples in tourist sector.

Lastly I most apologize for this late response of your emails.

Looki

Thanks again.

Yours sincerely

Kripa Kirati
Chairman
NIPDISC

*********

"Chief Illiniwek" - call for immediate  action

Mon, 25 Oct 1999 10:33:33 -0500
CALL FOR IMMEDIATE ACTION

  Dear Friends,

      The National Coalition on Racism in Sports and  the Media calls for your
  immediate and sustained action. The University of  Illinois, the state's
  flagship academic institution and one of our most stubborn cases on Indian
  mascots, is being evaluated for accreditation by the North Central
  Association of Colleges and Schools.

      The University administration, conveniently neglected to include the
  "Chief Illiniwek" issue in their required self-study, even though this had
  been requested and the Student-Faculty Senate had voted to eliminate the
  mascot (also 700 out of approx. 2100 UI faculty have expressed their
  opposition to this practice).

      Loss of accreditation would imply putting millions of dollars in federal
  funds at risk. Loss of revenue, is the quickest way to get the attention of
  the Board of Trustees, the Chancellor and the President of the University.
  To that end, we are asking you to write to the chairperson of the
  accreditation committee and to the committee itself, asking for
  accreditation to be withheld until the University stops using Native
  peoples and their cultures for entertainment and profit.

      Below is a sample letter and the addresses.
  Please take the time to send these off and ask your friends to do
  the same.

  In Solidarity,
  Paula Ostrovsky
  Co-coordinator
  NCRSM-IL

  1-The Accreditation Group:
  Public Comment/UIUC
  Commission on Institutions of Higher Education
  North Central Association of Colleges and Schools
  30 N. LaSalle St.
  Suite 2400
  Chicago, IL 60602

  2: The Chairperson of the Accreditation Group:
  Philip Certain
  Dean of Arts & Letters
  University of Wisconsin
  Madison, WI 53706

  3: The Sample Letter:
  Please withhold academic accreditation from the University of Illinois
  until their use of a Native American as their sports mascot ceases.
  Signed,
  Name
  Address

**************

Sacred Lands Under Seige ::: Support Sovereign Dineh Nation
23 Oct 1999
 
  ************************************************
  From: Lendra Ceinwyn
  *****************
  To weave for the Dine'h is a prayer of thanksgiving , "the
  People" whom some call Navajo. Without their sheep  they cannot pray.
 
  As of Feb1., 2000 this proud independent matriachal culture will be
  forced once again to move to a "New Land", to be relocated,
  which they have no word for in their language.
 
  In 1998, President Clinton signed the Relocation Act during a golf game,
  condemning the Dine'h to be moved again against their will, to "New Land"
  which is filled with radioactive uranium tailings at 100 times the maximum safety level.
 
    7 grandmothers have refused to sign over their land, and will refuse
  because Big Mountain is sacred to them, the Earth their Mother,
  this is their  lives they refuse to hand over to the BIA, and Peabody
  Coal. These 7 grandmothers are the elders of the Dine'h and represent 14,000 people.
 
  The Dine'h people are afraid that there will be another Ruby Ridge or
  Waco or Wounded Knee on or before Feb. 1
 
  Please sign the Petition to end the genocide of the Dine'h People, and
  let them continue to weave and breathe.
  This is surely one of the darkest episodes in our history.
 
  Sign Online Petition in Support of Navajo Elders
  http://www.freespeech.org/senaa/VPJava.html
  http://www.freespeech.org/senaa/VPnoJava.html
 
  ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
  Ya'a' te & Aloha All...
 
      The Altar-Land at Black Mesa is one of the sacred power-centers
  of our planet, and the balance of all life is being jeopardized by the
  ruthless and brutal rape of this mineral-rich area adjacent to the Grand
  Canyon.
 
     My Aunty, Roberta Blackgoat, is one of the "resistors", or traditional
  elders, who is holding out till the last, faced with guns, bulldozers,
  barbed wire, helicopters, and constant harrassment... in order to protect
  the medicine ways and family ties to this sacred place, now referred to
  simply as "Big Mountain."
 
     The extent of the conflict, the war of attrition carried out by U.S. &
  multinational corporate terrorists, and the total ecocide of the North
  section of Black Mesa (literally turned into a "hell on Earth"!) by
  United Energy & Peabody Coal through stripmining, is difficult to
  convey in words, or even pictures.
 
     Please take a short time out of your lives and visit the links below,
  watch  ::: "Vanishing Prayer" (RealPlayer)
  http://www.freespeech.org/senaa/VanPrayr2.ram
 
  Sign the online petition at SENAA, and after you've reviewed the
  situation, please send your letters of protest to the people below.
 
     Having lived out there with the elders, and walked in the footsteps
  of the ancients, having listened to the Hopi Prophecies, and the
  wisdom of the medicine carriers, I can testify to the importance
  of this struggle for sovereignty and self-determination, both
  culturally and ecologically. Walk the Altar-Land yourself, and
  feel the Spirit move in and around you...
 
    In the Spirit of Crazy Horse, Emilio Zapata, and Lili'uokalani
               BZ Bonoboy           Hilo, Kingdom of Hawai'i
                       sheeva@shaka.com
 
  Protests & Support for Elders to:::
  Secretary of Interior Bruce Babbitt
  bruce_babbitt@ios.doi.gov
 
  BIA Office of Congressional & Legislative Affairs
  http://www.doi.gov/bia/clahome.html
 
  U.S. Department of the Interior ::: BIA West
  OAIT@ios.doi.gov
  jackie_dean_cheek@ios.doi.gov
  danae_wilson@ios.doi.gov
 
  National Academy of Public Administration
  http://www.napawash.org/napa/index.html
  Comments to cbrouwer@napawash.org
  (Panel Urges Major Reforms at the Bureau of Indian Affairs)
 
  +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 
  FIGHTING THE BIA's "FINAL SOLUTION"
  by Al Swilling
 
  Kosovo is not the only place in the world conducting human rights abuses and
  ethnic cleansing. What the U.S. government doesn't want the Americanpublic
  to know is that the same crimes that NATO forces were so determined tostop
  in Kosovo are happening right now within United States borders. The
  following video outlines the story of the Dine'h (Navajo) who live at Big
  Mountain, on the Black Mesa, in northeastern Arizona.
 
    For the past 25 years, the Dine'h have been the victims of greed and
  government oppression in the extreme. Abandoned by their own tribal
  council by orders of the federal government, the Dine'h have been stripped of
  virtually every human, civil, and constitutional right because they refuse
  to leave their ancestral homeland and relocate into the only alternative
  provided by the U.S. government, which is known as the "New Land," land
  that is contaminated with uranium tailings that have rendered the land
useless, with radiation levels 100 times maximum safe levels.
 
  Now the Dine'h face a deadline of February 1, 2000, to relocate. The Bureau
  of Indian Affairs (BIA) has sworn that it will execute its "Final Solution"
  before the deadline. The Dine'h at Big Mountain fear that the BIA's "Final
  Solution" will be similar to the solutions executed at Waco, Ruby Ridge,   and
  Wounded Knee; with only the BIA remaining to tell the American public
  whatever it wants the public to believe and no one surviving to say otherwise.
 
  This video presentation conveys as no words can the story of the Dine'h of
  Black Mesa and the reasons for their suffering.
 
  If you would like a copy of the videotape, VANISHING PRAYER Genocide of
  the  Dineh, it is available by contacting Steve Sugarman at:
  steve@saveourplanet.org ,or from Sol Communications at
  meyesol@eudoramail.com
 
  VIEW "Vanishing Prayer" (RealPlayer)
  http://www.freespeech.org/senaa/VanPrayr2.ram
 
  We hope that you will join our battle to help the Dine'h remain on their
  ancestral homeland and to stop the ethnic cleansing and human rights
  violations being perpetrated by the federal government.
 
    The Dine'h now survive almost totally on charitable contributions. We   hope
  that you will join SENAA and others across the nation in helping to fight
  for these proud and peaceful people. For more photos and in-depth articles,
  etc., about the plight of the Dine'h people, visit SENAA's web site
  NEWSLETTER at: <http://members.xoom.com/senaa/index2.html .
 
  If you want to get involved and make a difference for the Dine'h and for
  your children and grandchildren's future, contact Al Swilling at:
  senaa1@netscape.net
 
  Contributions to help the Dine'h, can be mailed to: SEE 20110 Rockport Way
  Malibu, CA 90265
 
  Audio File (RealAudio)
  "Resource Extraction and the Genocide of the Navajo People"
  by Jackie A. Giuliano Ph.D
 
  http://www.freespeech.org/senaa/navajo.ram
 
  &&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&
 
  The View from the Hogan 7
  107 Days till the final solution
  Notes from Big Mountain
 
  Ya'a'tee
 
  First off, a point of terminology. I have been instructed to avoid using  the
  word"HPL" in my writing. The words HPL, JUA, Navajo Reservation, etc etc,
  are deeply painful and offensive. These words refer to lines drawn on maps
  and in the minds of those in Washington ( and their followers). They are not
  real, they divide that which is whole.
 
  I will refer to the land where these  words are being written as The Altar.
  The reasoning is this: Within the four sacred mountains that encompass
  Navajo land, is the hogan for the Dineh people. When a hogan is built to
  live in, it is a model of this Macrocosmic Hogan. This is why Ceremonies
  must take place inside a Hogan. This is also why bulldozing of Hogans is
  such an abominable and sacreligious crime.
 
  Within the Ceremonial Hogans is a space used for an altar. Within the
  Macrocosmic Hogan this space correlates to the Big Mountain area.
 
     We hear of many events and prayer vigils taking place in the first week
  of  October at U.S. Embassies abroad in support of the people here and against
  the continued genocide. To all of you who have worked hard at setting up
  these events, we send our prayers and thanks, as well as to all those who
  give of their precious time to attend these events. Let us hope that the
  hearts of those in Washington will be touched.
 
  As Sitting Bull said "As individual fingers we can easily be broken, but   all
  together we make a mighty fist."
 
  There is a good letter circulating on the Net from "the people of the land
  known as America" to the clowns in Washington. contact Beth at isco@efn.org
  and ask her to send you a copy. If you like what it says, then you just  send
  Beth your name and address and it will get appended.
 
  The Men In Black continue to visit Paulines land on a daily basis. They
  recently stopped at the site of this past summers Education/Witness camp,
  and -horror of horrors- they discovered a piece of soggy cardboard
  approximatley one foot square, and a small brown bottle that at one point
  contained ginger beer. Barely able to contain their outrage, many
  photographs were taken of the offending material, and they rushed back to
  HQ  as fast as possible. Imagine the scene, the BIA War room,... a group of
  Very  Important People cluster around the photos trying to decide what action
  to take against this latest outrage. Smart young men and women stride across
  the room with the latest satelite images.
 
    In the end they settle on an armed convoy composed of Hopi Rangers, BIA
  police, US marshalls, County Sherrifs, FBI and ATF, with a couple of
  National Guard Helicopter Gunships for back-up. Maybe I'm exaggerating
  SLIGHTLY, but what continues to take place here is a farce on a hugely
  criminal level, and sometimes I find humor to be my only defense against
  absurdity.
 
    Meanwhile, the real criminals, the BIA impoundment squads, continue to
  snatch the peoples animals even though there is more grass than could be
  consumed by flocks ten times as large. Of course we knew they were coming
  because the roads were graded. Normally the roads we travel are so bad they
  couldn't be classified as jeep trails, only last week I had to rush a woman
  to hospital in the middle of the night. A 75 mile journey took 2 and a half
  hours, each bump, rut and pot hole slowing us down and causing pain to my
  passenger.
 
  But when the BIA need to come in on a lightning raid to take the peoples
  animals, out come the dozers and graders to give them a nice smooth, fast
  ride. Your tax dollars hard at work.
  What may not be at all clear to  y'all out there is that this is all
  executed as military operations, these are para-military, multi-agency
  "squads" whose only aim is to cause fear and hardship. Loaded down with
  weapons and all the hi-tech toys money can by, elders who are alone are
  targetted.
 
  The following is a quote from Big Mountain Newsletter.
 
  The people of Big Mountain and the Joint Use Area say they are being
  terrorized. They cite jet airplanes flying so low that the pilot is  visible,
  BIA trucks cruising the Survival Camp and the peoples hogans, helicopters,
  and the apparent sabotage of wells and windmills, and so on. The government
  has answers for most of the charges, saying for instance that the jet
  flights are "routine" training patterns, the helicopters are "surveying"  and
  the trucks are "conducting a census". The government says the people are
  being "over dramatic" in their reactions.
  In the 1960's these same people said that they were attacked with poisonous
  gases from airplanes,  killing their livestock. It wasn't until years   later,
  when the white citizenry of Globe, Arizona, received a similar attack, that
  the U.S. admitted it had been using 2,4,5-T, an incredibly toxic pesticide,
  for "brush control" without proper safeguards.
 
  Even if the latest actions are in fact "routine", the question remains why
  all of these activities should suddenly escalate in the few months just
  prior to the July deadline for Navajo removal.
  The governments position on the jet flights is typical: the Air Force
  insists it is just running a normal training pattern which happens to pass
  directly over Big Mountain. Challenged at a recent hearing as to why the
  flights were necessary, and whether similar flights were scheduled over
  non-indian communities, the Air Force declined to explain.
 
  Spokespersons noted that it would not change the flights just to please the
  indians, regardless of ceremonies or other problems with the flights.
  Parents claimed the flights terrified their young children at school and
  literally knocked the elderly out of bed. Religious ceremonies are also
  disrupted and the livestock are scattered by the flights. The Air Force
  admits that it flies as low as 400 feet.
 
  Bottom line is that these Indian people are being subjected to procedures
  which the government wouldn't think of directing towards white communities.
  In this case the people under attack are the traditional Navajo and Hopi
  people of the Joint Use Area, already under incredible pressure due to 12
  years of implementation of the Relocation Act. The result is terror.
 
  That was written 14 years ago, and nothings changed..... its been going on
  the whole time since, and the view from the Hogan is inescapable that this
  is war, low-intensity maybe, but war nonetheless. One thing I am sure of,  is
  that both the people who plan this campaign of  harassment and those that
  carry it out, watch waaay too much TV.
 
    How is it that a war against Indians has been and is still being fought   on
  this continent for the past 30 years, and most people are only just finding
  out about it now?
 
  So, we are hurtling towards two big dates. January 1st, 2000 and February
  1st, 2000. I find it hard to get excited about the Millenium, some Roman
  dude, way back when, decides to change his peoples calendar and start time
  from a new date, how is that real? ......And anyway, don't most people know
  that the year begins on November 1st?
 
  When I think of Y2K, my first reaction is, how utterly terrifying it must
  be, to live in a world that is so unstable that a couple of digits on a
  silicon chip has the potential to bring it all tumbling down.
 
  My second thought is how absurd it is, that here on the Altar, are people
  who have the  knowledge, skills, and most importantly, the wisdom, to live
  without an infantile dependence on the Technostructure, and yet the  dominant
  society is hell-bent on rubbing out these people rather than listening to
  them and learning from them. If, in a worst case scenario (barring Nuclear
  Winter), the technostructure does collapse, then we here on the Altar will
  have to  make a few minor adjustments to our lifestyle ( though as I am now
  a cyber-slut, I'd surely miss conversing with all you good folks out  there),
  but overall the benefits would be enormous.
 
  The mine will close down. The sky will be free of huge, noisy, chunks of
  metal hurtling towards La La Land with Very Important People on board, and
  the Men in Black will cease harassing us  as the coal will be worthless. It
  would be my guess that many of you who have not been here cannot truly
  imagine what it is like to live outside of the Technostructure, without
  electricity, without plumbing, with the closest small store 20 miles away,
  asphalt road 30 miles away, telephone 36miles away, post office 40+ miles
  away, supermarket 74 miles away.
 
  The people here have never had these "amenities",... in what I consider a
  dumb move, the U.S. made it illegal for the people to "develop", hoping to
  encourage the people to leave, but what its caused is that the people
  continued with a way of life that has changed little for generations, and
  life is lived in a good way, depending on those most basic resources,  brains
  and bodies, something most of us have, life is generous.
 
  There is an often voiced belief "out there" that everybody in the world is
  so desperate to achieve the "American way of life", but I must tell you, it
  just ain't so.
 
  A little story may show this.Some years ago, when I was living with my
  Grandma and Grandpa, I figured that the price of a simple solar power  system
  was low enough for me to be able to raise the funds, so I asked my Grandma
  what she would use electricity for if I could supply it. I needed to figure
  what size system to work on. Her eyes immediately lit up, "an electric
  light,".... for the hogan in winter, so she could weave. Like many elderly
  people, her eyesight was not as sharp as it used to be, and with a keresone
  lamp the colors of the yarns were hard to see, so on the long winter nights
  she wasn't able to weave. " What else would you like" I asked. She thought
  for a while, and then said " an iron, to iron the rugs after they are
  finished". "Anything else" I asked. She thought, and thought....." how  about
  a microwave oven? refrigerator? TV?. She laughed. That was all she could
  think of to do with electricity, make it so she could spend even more hours
  sittin at the loom.
 
  Around this time I sat down and figured out how much these elderly women
  were getting paid to weave these beautiful rugs. Figuring in the time it
  takes to raise the sheep, shear, wash, clean, card, spin, dye the wool, set
  up the loom, and then do the weaving, I reckoned they were lucky if they
  were getting 2 bucks an hour.
 
  So any of you in the market for a genuine navajo rug, please bear in mind
  what a deal you're getting.  On the subject of rugs, for those of you in   the
  neighbourhood of  Missoula, Montana, there is an exhibition of   approximately
  50 rugs from the resisters here at the Art Gallery, in the University.  These
  are the real things, and the show runs till Oct 31st. I saw some of the  rugs
  on their way up there, and there is some beautiful work.
 
  I would be out of line to have a favorite, but Fanny Goys rugs are
  particularly fine. Roberta Blackgoat will be in town for a reception on
  Saturday the 30th, so that would certainly be worth attending.  On the
  subject of Robertas travels, she will be in Washington DC during the second
  week of November. I don't have any locations or dates for her appearances
  there, but for sure she will be at the concert where Blackfire are playing.
 
  Presuming of course we survive Y2K, we then come to February 1st, 2000. Who
  knows what is going to happen? The Feds and the HTC know, but they ain't
  saying. There have been deadlines before, and a pattern has emerged.  Threats
  of forced evictions are broadcast, support is mobilized, the media takes an
  interest, the deadline arrives, nothing happens, the media lose interest,
  support wanes, and back to the daily grind of low-intensity warfare and siege tactics.
 
  Maybe that will happen again, but maybe not. Warmaker is not known for
  making rational decisions, so it's best to plan for all eventualities.
 
    Back in the real world, the weather has changed. It hasn't rained for   some
  weeks now. Back to the usual intense blue dome above. The sun is much lower
  in the sky, the shadows are larger, the colors richer, and the days shorter.
 
  The Dineh name for this moon is "back to back", where the two seasons touch.
  The corn's all harvested, primary chore now is to bring in, cut, and chop
  firewood for the coming winter. There is already a nip in the night air, a
  killing frost took out my squash and tomato plant a few weeks ago.
 
  Like most life-sustaining activities round here, cutting firewood is illegal
  according to the Feds and the HTC. I know for a fact that sons of two of
  the Grandmas went into Hopi Tribal Offices to get a woodcutting permit and
  left without one, so even though no-ones been arrested in a while for cutting
  wood, it is one more stress and worry on the people.
 
    I've been too busy with the flock and the firewood to take advantage of   the
  other bumper harvest this year, Pinyon nuts, a much favored delicacy.
  Travelling across the Altar one sees people out, under the trees,  collecting
  as much as possible before the 4 legged and winged get their share.
 
  The sight of people collecting free food always feels festive to me. I
  stopped by Robertas place late one afternoon after she had been out picking
  all day. We sat in front of her house and watched her sheepherder bring  home
  the flock. Behind us, on her door, was a simple sign that reads:
 
  Entering Sovereign Dineh Nation Thin Rock Mesa All are welcome who repect
  the land, life, and law of the Dineh Warning! Federal, state, and tribal
  personnel, your jurisdiction does not apply here Your actions will be counter-acted.
 
  Similar signs are re-appearing around the Altar. As we sat, a huge strange
  looking object flew slowly over us. grabbing noculars I saw that it was the
  Space Shuttle, piggy-backed on a big jet transport. I explained to Roberta
  what the space shuttle was, and how it put all the satellites up in the  sky,
  and how some of those satellites can take pictures of us here on the ground.
 
  Her eyes immediately lit up, "we should write SUE THE CREATOR out there"
  she said, pointing to the land out in front of the house, Sooo there is now a
  message being laid out on the ground in front of her place, so if you happen
  to be an owner or operator of a spy satellite, point it to:
 
  36 degrees 14 minutes 79 seconds N 110 degrees 38 minutes 62 seconds W
  Also  if you are a pilot or photographer who wants to take some pictures of this
  message, you're welcome.
  One final thought on Y2K, we hear of big bucks being made by supplying Y2K
  survival information, so, I make the following offer; for a mere fifty  bucks
  a day, you are invited to the BOPEEP Y2K SURVIVAL SCHOOL, topics covered
  will include:
 
  How to avaoid freezing by using an axe. How to avoid thirst by walking to a
  spring with a bucket. How to avoid starvation by grubbing around in dirt  and
  blood and guts. How to repair just about anything with baling wire. 1001
  things to do when your television doesn't work. etc  etc.
 
     We human beings are an incredible species. Our brains and bodies are
  perfectly capable of doing all thats necesesary to keep life going in a  good
  way, but more than that, we are capable of profoundly beautiful acts of
  love, kindness, and generosity. Yet we are taught to feel powerless and to
  fear each other and to fear life itself. Why? (I am reliably informed that
  that is a rhetorical question)  But then, what the hell do I know,........
  I'm just a sheepherder.
  "We need to be kinder to each other"  Your prayers, support, and
  correspondence are invited.  I thank you for your time that you have given
  me by reading this.  For all my relations  Bo Peep  reachable via
  unclejake74@hotmail.com
 
  P.S. To all those who have written to me, please be aware that owing to the
  pressing needs of the flock, the firewood, and the Grandmas, the office is
  sometimes left unattended for days at a time. It may take as long as a half
  moon between when you write, and when you hear back from me. Around here  the
  information superhighway is a muddy jeep trail. Please be patient, you will
  hear from me.  If you have received this update as a forward, but want to
  sure of getting them in the future, please let me know and I will add you  to
  the list. Also if there are any "back issues" you don't have, again, let me
  know.  Please feel free to distribute (unedited) this email
 
  http://members.xoom.com/senaa/View.html

**********

INDIGENOUS PEOPLES RIGHTS DEBATES
C
ompromise on Article 3?:   Self-determination


From: Boyle, Francis [mailto:FBOYLE@LAW.UIUC.EDU]

  Thought some of you might find this to be of interest. It concerns
the negotiations going on now in Geneva at UN Headquarters on the Draft
Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
Best regards,
Francis Boyle.

Saturday, October 23, 1999
Compromise on Article 3?
Importance: High

Dear Indigenous Friends:
  This morning  I read through the debates on self-determination.
Although I am not there, it appears to me that you are going around in
circles once again  on this critical matter with the States. They simply
are
not paying attention to what you have to say. For what it is worth,
therefore, it is still my advice that you offer them the following
compromise on Article 3 that will protect your right to self-determination
while at the same time meet any "legitimate" concerns some of these States
might have. If you have any questions, please feel free to give me a call at
217-333-7954.
Aloha.
Francis A. Boyle
Professor of International Law

From: Boyle, Francis [mailto:FBOYLE@LAW.UIUC.EDU]
Sent: Wednesday, December 02, 1998 1:35 PM

Subject: Compromise on Article 3
Importance: High

Dear Friends:
  Once again, for what it is worth, I hereby offer the following
compromise language on Article 3 that meets legitimate concerns about
secession.
Francis A. Boyle
Professor of International Law

Francis A. Boyle
Law Building
504 E. Pennsylvania Ave.
Champaign, Ill. 61820
Phone: 217-333-7954
Fax: 217-244-1478
fboyle@law.uiuc.edu

  ----------
  From: Boyle, Francis[SMTP:FBOYLE@LAW.UIUC.EDU]
  Sent: Thursday, November 06, 1997 9:44 AM
  Subject: ADDITION TO ARTICLE 3?
  Importance: High

  Francis A. Boyle
  Law Building
  504 E.Pennsylvania Ave.
  Champaign, Illinois 61820
  Phone: 217-333-7954
  Fax: 217-244-1478
  fboyle@law.uiuc.edu
  6 November 1997

  My Dear Indigenous Friends:

  I have done some research on this stalemate confronting all the
  delegations in Geneva on Draft Article 3:

  DRAFT ARTICLE 3 (self-determination )
        " Indigenous peoples have the right of self-
          determination. By virtue of that right they
          freely determine their political status and
          freely pursue their economic, social and
          cultural development."

  I am making the following proposal for all the delegations to
  consider. I am assuming that some of the States have legitimate concerns
  about the question of secession. However, for example, it is clear that
  the United States government's objection that the Mormon's are the
  indigenous people of Utah is not made in good faith. This is a
  ridiculous objection that is deliberately designed to insult you and to
  treat you like idiots. But let us assume that there are some states
  which support Indigenous Peoples but nevertheless do have some
  legitimate concerns about secession. Can something be done that would
  alleviate their concerns while at the same time protecting the rights of
  indigenous peoples?
  Remember I am making this proposal for your consideration in
  full awareness that I am not on the front-lines of the battle. You are
  the warriors, not me. You have to decide, not me. It is your futures
  that are at stake, not mine. Ultimately, I will respect and support your
  decision if you do not agree with me. But that being said, I offer the
  following for your consideration:

  The Declaration on Principles of International Law Concerning
  Friendly Relations and Co-Operation Among States in Accordance with the
  Charter of the United Nations was adopted by the United Nations General
  Assembly by consensus on October 24, 1970 in G.A. Res. 2625 (XXXV) 25
  GAOR, Supp. (No. 28) 121; reprinted in 9 International Legal Materials
  1292 (1970). The fact that the Declaration was adopted by consensus
  means that no State dissented, not even the United States. In other
  words, the contents of the Declaration were fully acceptable to all the
  State Members of the United Nations Organization at that time.Today the
  Declaration is universally considered to constitute customary
  international law.
  I will not bother to go through the entirety of this lengthy
  Declaration at this time. But for our purposes, the relevant portion is
  as follows:

  The principle of equal rights and self-determination of peoples

  By virtue of the principle of equal rights and
  self-determination of peoples enshrined in the Charter of the United
  Nations, all peoples have the right freely to determine, without
  external interference, their political status and to pursue their
  economic, social and cultural development, and every State has the duty
  to respect this right in accordance with the provisions of the Charter.
  Every State has the duty to promote, through joint and separate
  action, realization of the principle of equal rights and
  self-determination of peoples, in accordance with the provisions of the
  Charter, and to render assistance to the United Nations in carrying out
  the responsibilities entrusted to it by the Charter regarding the
  implementation of the principle, in order:

  (a) To promote friendly relations and co-operation among States;
  and

  (b) To bring a speedy end of colonialism, having due regard to
  the freely expressed will of the peoples concerned;

  and bearing in mind that subjection of peoples to alien subjugation,
  domination and exploitation constitutes a violation of the principle, as
  well as a denial of fundamental human rights, and is contrary to the
  Charter.

  Every State has the duty to promote through joint and separate
  action universal respect for and observance of human rights and
  fundamental freedoms in accordance with the Charter.

  The establishment of a sovereign and independent State, the free
  association or integration with an independent State or the emergence
  into any other political status freely determined by a people constitute
  modes of implementing the right of self-determination by that people.

  Every State has the duty to refrain from any forcible action
  which deprives peoples referred to above in the elaboration of the
  present principle of their right to self-determination and freedom and
  independence.  In their actions against, and resistance to, such
  forcible action in pursuit of the exercise of their right to
  self-determination, such peoples are entitled to seek and to receive
  support in accordance with the purposes and principles of the Charter.

  The territory of a colony or other Non-Self-Governing Territory
  has, under the Charter, a status separate and distinct from the
  territory of the State administering it; and such separate and distinct
  status under the Charter shall exist until the people of the colony or
  Non-Self-Governing Territory have exercised their right of
  self-determination in accordance with the Charter, and particularly its
  purposes and principles.

  Nothing in the foregoing paragraphs shall be construed as
  authorizing or encouraging any action which would dismember or impair,
  totally or in part, the territorial integrity or political unity of
  sovereign and independent States conducting themselves in compliance
  with the principle of equal rights and self-determination of peoples as
  described above and thus possessed of a government representing the
  whole people belonging to the territory without distinction as to race,
  creed or colour.

  Every State shall refrain from any action aimed at the partial
  or total disruption of the national unity and territorial integrity of
  any other State or country.

  As you can see from this language, the Declaration establishes a
  balance between the right of self-determination and secession. This
  language is the customary international law on the subject. Therefore, I
  would like to suggest for your consideration that  you propose to the
  States an additional sentence to be added at the end of  Draft Article 3
  as follows:

  "Indigenous peoples shall exercise the right of self-determination in
  accordance with the requirements of international law, including the
  Declaration on Principles of International Law Concerning Friendly
  Relations and Co-Operation Among States in Accordance with the Charter
  of the United Nations (1970)."

  The addition of this sentence to Draft Article 3 should
  alleviate any legitimate concerns held by States about secession. While
  at the same time, this language will fully protect your right of
  self-determination. The States have already accepted the Declaration as
  far back as 1970. Today, the Declaration is considered to constitute
  customary international law. Therefore, the States should be willing to
  accept this reference to the Declaration in Draft Article 3. Conversely,
  if a State is not willing to accept the reference to the Declaration,
  then it seems to me that this State is not dealing with you in good
  faith.
  If you agree with my analysis that this addition to Draft
  Article 3 is a reasonable compromise, then I would ask you to forward it
  to your people in Geneva. If they have any questions about it, they are
  free to contact me by phone or fax as indicated above. If they agree
  with my analysis, then the delegations could tender it to the States as
  a  reasonable and good faith compromise proposal designed to end the
  deadlock over Draft Article 3.

  Yours very truly,

  Francis A. Boyle
  Professor of International Law

  Francis A. Boyle
  Law Building
  504 E. Pennsylvania Ave.
  Champaign, Ill. 61820
  Phone: 217-333-7954
  Fax: 217-244-1478
  fboyle@law.uiuc.edu
visit the Khandi Pages
http://www.netset.com/~khandi
ICQ # 53121539

*********

Genocidal bill HR 1814
Oct. 18, 1999  
  
   Greetings:
  
    The American Indian Movement of Florida asks all HUMAN BEINGS to take note
   of a undisguised attack on the sovereign rights of Indian Nations called HR
   1814. This bill, in basic form, would force Indian Nations to pay sales tax
   to the states that they are surrounded by. If they fail to pay they will lose
   trust lands that might be returned, according to the bill, if they pay back taxes etc,
  
   This is nothing but a continuation of the history. The new Custers and
   Chivingtons are named Bob Graham who parlays himself as a democrat and
   environmentalist and now can be exposed as a FRAUD, also from Florida a Rep.
   Rothman, Rep. Canaday.
  
   We sincerely hope the good people, that surely must exist within the halls of
   Congress, have the wherewithall to support this insane piece of legislative
   fiat. We shall support any lobby in any fashion we can from here to oppose and kill this bill.
  
   However we call upon ALL HUMAN BEINGS to do  everything possible from this
   moment forward to oppose REP. Graham, Canady, Rothman and the other
   "Custer's" who authored this anti-Indian, Anti-Treaty rights and
   anti-sovereignty piece of legislation in their futures. It is the goal of
   Florida AIM that these uncloaked anti-Indian forces political future is non-existent.
  
   Thank You.

*********

Monday, October 18, 1999 (Online Edition 179)
 
March of Honduran Indians and Blacks met with  bullets
 
   By WENDY GRIFFIN
 
   TEGUCIGALPA -- As has become a custom since 1992,  Honduran indigenous
   groups and Blacks organized a protest march for Oct.  12,  Columbus Day.
   This year's march was called "Marcha de los  Excluidos"   (March of those who
   are Excluded), and populist Ladino organizations  from  southern and
   northern Honduras joined in.
 
   Each group brought its own protests. The march date  was  not kept a secret,
   but was rather well publicized through the media.  Juan  Laboriel, a
   Garifuna residing in the United States who came for  the  march, said
   marchers were surprised when they were met by the  police when they were
   yet a long way from town. Celeo Alvarez, president of the Garifuna
   organization ODECO, said indigenous leaders were meeting with the
   government when a zafarrancho or skirmish began, with the
  police shooting  real bullets and the crowd answering back with rocks.
 
   The indigenous people and other marchers whose numbers may have reached
   several thousand were eventually able to explain their demands at the
   Supreme Court and at the Congressional building. It was when they
   approached the Presidential Palace that the shooting occurred, even though
   President Flores had already given his permission to march, said Alvarez.
 
   Some of the Garifuna marchers felt that the reason for the clash was that
   the denouncements they wished to make were serious and involved people
   high up in the Liberal Party during the administrations of Reina and
   Flores. Besides their basic protest about the proposed reform of Article
   107 of the Constitution that would permit foreigners to buy land on the
   coast and in the islands, the Garifunas came to protest recent actions in
   Limon.
 
   During a previous march on Tegucigalpa, a high level inter-ministerial
   committee had been formed to ensure that the Reina administration kept the
   promises the president signed with the ethnic groups. As a result of
   agreements between all Garifuna organizations (a very difficult task) and
   the National Agrarian Institute (INA), supported by this inter-ministerial
   task force, the agricultural cooperatives of Garifunas from Limon were
   given title deeds to land in Vallecito near Limon, culminating a nine-year
   struggle.
 
   In spite of this, the Garifunas of Limon have been unable to use about 80
   acres of land, because a man there says he is "taking care of this land
   for Miguel Facusse," reports an organizer of the March. Facusse is a
   wealthy Honduran businessman with African palms planted in the area, as
   well as a resort near Limon. The Garifunas of Limon went to court to have
   their title to the land recognized and this person removed. Facusse
   submitted a request for injunction in the courts of La Ceiba to stop the
   Garifunas from removing this person. The Garifunas have denounced this
   case to the Fiscalia de las Etnias (Special Prosecutor for Ethnic Affairs).
 
   The leaders of the protest in Limon have received threats against their
   lives and there is reportedly a contract paid to a Ladino named Osvaldo to
   kill Lombardo Lacayo, the former mayor of Limon. Lacayo reports that four
   attempts have been made against his life. The most serious was on Sept. 26
   when an object was thrown on the palm thatch roof of his house. The roof
   burst into flames, with his wife and his four children in the house. While
   he was rescuing the children, someone shot four shots into the house. All
   the people got out alive, but the house, all their possessions, a car, and
   Hurricane Mitch donations for Limon were lost in the flames.
 
   The Garifunas were joined in their protest by Ladinos from Tocoa, who felt
   that Carlos Escaleras was also murdered by contract for his stand against
   the construction of an African palm processing plant near Tocoa.
 
   Because coverage of the march switched to the confrontation with police,
   Honduran Spanish-language papers gave little attention to the issues. Many
   of those who were wounded were Lencas who had come to protest activities
   by sawmill owners like Juan de la Cruz Avelar, one of the vice presidents
   in the Reina administration, who is active in the area of the Montecillos
   park where nine Lenca communities are located. La Tribuna
  reported that  the Lencas also thought that current Vice President
  Billy Handal was  responsible for deforestation in the area of San
  Isidro.
 
   Deforestation was also on the minds of the Tawahkas who marched to protest
   the deforestation of the Rio Platano Biosphere. A Congressional commission
   found that the Tawahka complaints of illegal airfields next to saw mills,
   excessive logging in the Biosphere and the burning of forest for cattle
   ranching and agricultural activities were all true.
 
   As a result of the march, the proposal to change  Article  107 of the
   Constitution will not even be discussed in the  Congress.  If people are
   almost killed for agricultural lands given with  legal  titles supported by
   the highest authorities of the land, what would not  happen with lands less
   well protected? Alvarez also said the ethnic groups  will  meet with human
   rights commissions at the national and Central  American  levels. "Today's
   activities will have a high political cost," he  said.
 
   Copyright (c) 1999 Marrder Omnimedia in association  with  Galaxy
   Multimedia. All Rights Reserved.

*********

Mon, 18 Oct 1999
Felony charges considered for Columbus protesters
in Pueblo, Colorado


We need a minute of your time...and possibly your fax.
 On Columbus Day this  year, October 11th, there was a protest held by Native
Americans and Chicanos  at the "shrine" to Christopher Columbus here in
Pueblo.  For those of you  unaware, this "celebration" was started right here in
Pueblo, Colorado by  Italian immigrants. It then spread across the nation.  It
is of utmost  importance that you understand how strong the Italian
community is here.

During the protest, some of the protesters had filled balloons with red dye
to symbolize the blood that was shed by this monster.  In their frustration
these were thrown and some red dye spilled on the clothes
of the Italians  that were doing a counter-protest.  Today, the Sheriff
of Pueblo County,  Dan Corsentino (Italian!!) announced that in viewing the
tape of the protest,  they had been able to identify those who threw the dye
filled balloons and  they are considering filing FELONY charges against
anyone who had them in  their possession.  They are claiming over $5,000 in
damages to the Italian's  clothes!   They were wearing polo shirts and baseball
hats for Pete's sake!!!
   This is absurd and racist.  The Italian protesters were portrayed as
wonderful upright citizens that had a right to celebrate their "hero" and all
others have been portrayed as violent,  belligerent, hot heads.  They won't
even consider the reasons behind the protest or why this is so offensive to
us.

Please, I ask you to contact the Sheriff's office by fax or mail or phone and
do it TODAY.  This cannot happen.  These young people had every right to
express their frustration in the celebration of this enslaver, torturer and
murderer of our ancestors. It is paramount to a national celebration by the
Germans of Hitler in Jerusalem.  They refuse to listen or take our concerns
as valid.

Please, fax your comments now and also to the Pueblo Chieftain newspaper.  Be
respectful in your comments, we will not win our argument by name calling or
foul language, but be FIRM in your comments.  It is obvious to us that if the
Sheriff were not Italian these charges never would have been considered. 

Fax number for the Sheriff's office is:  719-583-6143.
 
Phone number is:
719-583-6125            the Pueblo Chieftain's (newspaper)
719-544-5897 and  phone number is: 719-544-3520.

Make sure that any "facts" that you state, are accurate, because they will be
scrutinized and we need to make sure that we know what we are talking about
since it will be under such close observation.  These young people need your
help and they need it NOW, before any further action is taken.

Mitakuye Oyasin, Renee Still Day N.A.T.I.V.E.S.
Pueblo, Colorado
Reprinted under the Fair Use
http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html
doctrine of international copyright law.

**********

 

March In Sisseton

http://www.kelotv.com/News/Detail.cfm?ID=1772&NewsSet=1

10 / 16 / 1999
Indian Protesters March in Sisseton
First, there were calls for justice in the death of Robert Many Horses.
Now, another death of a Native American has protesters on the march in
Northeast KELO-LAND. More than one-hundred people marched through the
streets of Sisseton today, in honor of an Indian man killed in a drunk
driving accident in which the white driver is now free.
KELO-LAND'S Erin Payne reports.

A song for justice, and a wavering flag for peace. It's a mile long march
in Sisseton, where people are going the extra mile for one thing, they're
"seeking their equal rights, equal treatment."
 
They're upset because vehicular homicide charges have been dropped against
the driver of a truck that struck and killed Justin Redday, a Native
American who died in May.
 
The protest starts at a local park, goes through downtown, and ends at the
Roberts County courthouse. The message of the march? Justice. Something
they say they aren't getting in KELO-LAND courthouses.
 
The protesters are also searching for answers in the death of another
Native American, Robert Many Horses of Mobridge. "We're not advocating for
violence, hatred or anything in that manner. We're only demanding justice,"
says Mark White Bull, who is on Many Horses' Justice for Boo Committee.
 
Banners show the signs of their anger, an upside down American flag marks
their distress. It's a shadowy thing...death...that's bringing these Indian
protestors together, but they're trying to get some good out of it, through
activism. "We're trying to plan a march every week like Rosebud, Pine
Ridge, to show that people here aren't going to take the injustice," says
Della Eastman, of the Eastern Dakota Chapter of the American Indian Movement.
 
So how far will they walk for justice? "Until there's change. Maybe that's
not going to be immediately. But if it takes time, then so be it," says White Bull.
 
Mark Appel was driving the truck that struck and killed Redday. Both men
had been drinking. Appel pleaded guilty to driving while intoxicated so the
vehicular homicide charge could be dropped.

*********

16 Oct 1999 17:31:38 -0400
Micmac fishing violence escalates
 
  MNN.  Mohawk Nation News.  16 Oct. 99.  At this  moment hundreds of
  non-native fishing boats are destroying fishing equipment of the natives
  in Yarmouth Nova Scotia Canada harbour.  They need your letters of
  support and ideas.

For the Full Story and how you can help, Click over to our Canadian Native Page here

***********

Sent: Monday, October 18, 1999 3:17 AM

[senaa] SORRY SO SILENT


  Brothers & Sisters

  Sorry I have been so silent for the past few days. I have been replying
  to a mountain of e-mail from people--apparently novices--who could not
  find how to get into the guestbook/petition to sign it. Most were
  apparently looking for a button to click on. Some of them did not know
  what linked text is, and there were some other minor details that had to
  be worked out. Apparently, some of the people that we made contact with
  at the demonstrations have put the word out. Anyway, I have been
  downloading signatures from the online petition that I set up for SENAA:
  120+ Friday, 220+ Saturday, and 320+ Today. If this keeps up, we will
  have a huge cache of online signatures besides those we gather from
  printed petitions.

  I have also gotten dozens of e-mails to SENAA from people who are
  printing out petitions and passing them around to fiends, family,
  co-workers, church groups, college classes, etc. My hopes, it seems, are
  being substantiated that everyone who hears about the Dine'h is outraged
  at what the U.S. government is doing to the Dine'h. Everyone who wrote
  vehemently opposes the relocation, especially to contaminated land. A
  few have asked why we have not notified the "mainstream media." When I
  explain the situation there, it infuriates them even more.

  The amazing part is that the majority of those who are responding are
  non-Indigenous people who are fed up with the way the government is
  treating us and ashamed of the way their ancestors treated us. We have a
  vast amount of support among non-Indigenous people worldwide. There are
  responses from Australia, all over Europe, South America, Canada, and
  other nations who are vowing support for the Dine'h and what SENAA is
  doing to try to stop the relocation.

  Friday, I established a guestbook specifically for the online Petition.
  You can view the guestbook signatures and their comments by going to
  either of SENAA International's web sites. I now have a button on the
  following pages, as near the top of the page as possible:

  http://members.xoom.com/senaa
  http://members.xoom.com/senaa/index2.html
  http://www.freespeech.org/senaa/VPJava.html and
  http://www.freespeech.org/senaa/VPnoJava.html

 

  GENOCIDE IN AMERICA: SIGN OUR PETITION

  E-mail everyone you know and urge them to sign the online petition and
  to print out petitions to pass around their communities. Inform them,
  too, of the mailing information. It can be found just below the
  Printable petition links.

  I want to thank each of you for the wonderful job you are doing getting
  the word out. We are now beginning to see some results of our hard work.

  Your brother in Spirit
  Al


********************

Date: Thu, 14 Oct 1999
LETTER TO U.S. CONSUL, HAMBURG, GERMANY

General Consul Christopher F. Lynch's letter in response follows.

(translated from the German by Alan Frankel)
FIAN (International Human Rights Organization [Working] for the Right to
Feed Oneself)
Fian Group, Hamburg, Prof. Harald Ihmig, Beim Rauhen Hause 30, 22111
Hamburg, Tel. 651-8393

Hamburg, 9 September 1999

General Consul Christopher S. Lynch
Alsterufer 27-28
20354 Hamburg

Dear General Consul Lynch:

For years, we have been observing with alarm the abuses to which the
Dineh/Navajo are subjected in a country that considers itself a leader
in human rights.

What has been defined as "relocation" in order to settle a land
dispute between two Native American tribes has proven to be evacuation
of a region of economic interest. Both Dineh and Hopi elders have
opposed the division of land and the policy of exploitation of resources
that are leading to the destruction of their cultural and religious
identity. People to whom the ancestral land surrounding Big Mountain is
holy are being uprooted or gradually driven below subsistence level.
Their resistance is to be crushed by continuing reprisals: ruling their
presence illegal, banning construction and repair work, confiscating
livestock, blocking access to pastureland and springs, and subjecting them
to capricious acts and fraud by rangers and BIA agents. The fact that
the tribal councils, who profit economically from the arrangement,
approved the division of the land and the expulsion of the Dineh who did
not agree to a limited lease under foreign jurisdiction, does not change
the fact that they did so over the heads of the people affected.

The offenses against fundamental human rights, documented in detail,
led to an on-site investigation by the UN special correspondent for
religious intolerance in February 1998, and his subsequent report to the
55th session of the human rights committee in April 1999. However, the
"Final Solution" of the Dineh problem, the forced deportation of the
inhabitants still remaining in the artificially created Hopi Partitioned
Land, is still scheduled for 1 February 2000.

We are working to prevent the people remaining on their ancestral land,
many of whom we know, from being subjected to this act of violence, and
to keep the USA from beginning the next millennium with such a scandal.

FIAN International, a worldwide organization for the right of people to
feed themselves, has adopted the case of the Dineh. Our Hamburg FIAN
group is responsible for this case. We ask you to transmit to your
government our protest against the past and imminent abuses against the
Dineh and against the offenses against their right to live. We are
interested in holding a discussion with you and would appreciate an
appointment in October.

Sincerely,

Prof. H. Ihmig
_______________________________________________________
HERE IS THE TEXT OF THE LETTER PROF. IHMIG RECEIVED IN RESPONSE (it's also available as a .tif file, attached)

CONSULATE GENERAL OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA / HAMBURG
September 22, 1999

Prof. Harald Ihmig
FIAN-Gruppe Hamburg
Beim Rauhen Hause 30
22111 Hamburg

Dear Prof. Ihmig:

Thank you for your letter of 9 September in which you expressed your concern about the Dineh Navajo Native Americans in Arizona. I am sorry to take so long to respond to your letter, but I wanted to read the UN Report you mentioned and to research this issue before writing back to you.

The U.S. record in dealing with its Native American population has not been a good one overall. In recent years, however, the American people have become more sensitized to this issue and the last few administrations have made considerable progress in correcting many of the past injustices. Under the Clinton administration, in particular, a much greater sensitivity to Native American issues has been shown and a number of steps have been taken to secure thie rights, respect their traditions and cultures, and to improve their economic situation.

With respect to this issue, however, the situation is rather complicated and does not permit an easy answer. As you are well aware, the dispute between the Dineh Navajos and the Hopis grew out of conflicting claims over the same territory. Both tribal groups have legitimate claims that are unfortunately in conflict, as well as economic interests (namely mining) that have a direct bearing on the economic well-being of the Indian tribes. It fell to the federal government to reach some compromise that would take into account the various interests involved and would best serve the cause of justice while respecting the cultural and religious traditions of both groups as much as possible. As one might expect, such a situation cannot be resolved to the satisfaction of everyone and even the best solution will leave at least one party unsatisfied.

Paragraph 67 of the UN Report contains a statement from the Department of State which bears repeating here. The U.S. Government is painfully aware of the abuses that Native Americans have suffered historically and recent years have seen considerable progress in rectifying many of those mistakes. However, this is a long-term process and these mistakes cannot be corrected at once. What is significant is the change in attitudes that has taken place and the fact that we are now addressing these issues and working closely with Native American populations to deal with their problems in a fair and equitable manner. The Clinton Administration has been especially forthcoming in this respect and, while much work remains to be done, there is a clear desire to continue building on the progress that has been made.

The U.N. report (paragraph 68) also has a statement from the Department of Justice which explains their position on this issue. I cannot add anything to these two statements. There are several web sites on the Internet you can turn to for further study on both sides of this issue and I am including some of that information for your benefit. I especially recommend the article from the Christian Science Monitor * as it gives a very good overview of the issue, whereas the other materials all advocate a position in the debate.

I hope this reply will be of some help to you in examining this sensitive and important issue. We appreciate the interest of the FIAN-Gruppe in this dispute and understand very well your concern for the rights of Native Americans and the preservation of their cultural and religious traditions. Many Americans, both inside and outside the federal government, share your concerns and are working very hard to reach a just and equitable resolution to this issue. I am confident that a means will be found to address the many concerns in this dispute in a fair manner.

Thank you again for your interest.

Sincerely,
(signed)
Christopher F. Lynch
Consul General
___________
*I believe he's referring to the article of January 26, 1999, by Daniel B. Wood, with photographs by Robert Harbison.


-- Carol S. Halberstadt, Migrations (carol@migrations.com)
Native American art and crafts
http://www.migrations.com


**************

October 13, 1999 7:39 AM
URGENT: CALL FOR AUTHORS FOR AGRICULTURE
DIALOGUE PAPERS


Dear brothers and sisters,

FYI for your participation, and please circulate to any other Indigenous
Peoples organizations who work with traditional/sustainable agriculture
issues and LAND MANAGEMENT and have something to say about it!

The UN hasn't made it easy for us to convince community, grass roots people
with real, hands-on expertise in specific areas (like agriculure) that we
can have any kind of policy impact at the international level.  But if we
don't take advantage of this opening to get some direct IP input into the
CSD through these groundwork-laying papers NOW for the CSD session, it'll
mean months of struggle to make sure our issues aren't pushed to the sides
LATER in the formal part of the CSD process. (There will be a diverse block
of Indigenous and
non-Indigenous NGOs together as allies on the GMO issue & organic farming,
etc., but interests could clash when stakes are high re: Land issues).

Treaty Council can work with people on the papers, if needed (and later, as
we prepare as an Indigenous Caucus toward the Intersessional Meeting in Feb.
and the official CSD-8 session in April) from a more international
perspective, but it's the LOCAL voices that I'm trying to make sure get
heard at the UN.

THANKS,
Carol

************

Wed, 13 Oct 1999 11:32:42 -0400
Paul Doxtater Hunger Strike  
   The London Free Press
   Copyright (c) 1999, Sun Media Corporation
  
   HUNGER STRIKE PUTS FOCUS ON SPIRITUALITY
   Thursday, October 7, 1999
   Page: A3
  
   BY JULIE CARL, FREE PRESS COLUMNIST
  
   Say you were denied to shower and cleanse yourself  for a week at a time.
   During those weeks how would you feel?
   Worthless, dirty, unworthy.
   Pretend the dirt and grime and oil that sticks to you is negative
   emotions, hate, anger and jealousy. They stick to your mind and soul.
   Suppose only one day of the week are you allowed to free yourself from
   them. During those weeks how would you feel?
   Worthless, dirty, unworthy.
   Those words were scrawled in 1994, in a childish  hand, by a native young
   offender after officials ended daily native rituals at his detention centre.
   Paul Doxtator draws strength and inspiration from the boy's writing as
   he, too, fights for change to native programs in  prisons.
   At sunrise yesterday, Doxtator started a hunger strike to force change.
   The Onyota'a:ka man thought of those words as he vowed to take only
   water until Ontario's Correctional Services Ministry makes improvements.
   Doxtator fasted for two weeks in 1985 to win sweat  lodges, a native
   purification ritual, for fellow prisoners in  Millhaven Penitentiary.
   Since his release 11 years ago and his discovery of  the "good red road,"
   the journey of a native person connecting to his  culture, Doxtator has
   used other means to make his point: Native inmates need to embrace their
   spirituality to be truly rehabilitated.
   In 1995, he and other Onyota'a:ka members ran from  their reserve just
   west of London to Goderich to protest the lack of native programs at the
   Bluewater Youth Centre near Goderich.
   He's written letters, spoken at gatherings and organized healing   circles.
   Most recently, Doxtator worked with a handful of  London activists --
   native and non-native -- who volunteered to  supervise native programs in
   provincial jails. Unlike the federal system, the  province bans inmates
   from meeting without an outsider to supervise.
   The London group, Circle of Friends, could not get a  foot in the door at
   Bluewater Detention Centre, London's Elgin-Middlesex  Detention Centre or
   other jails. But after much letter-writing and agitating, they began a
   twice-monthly group in April at Maplehurst  Correctional Centre in Milton.
   Relations with officials there soured about two  months after the Native
   Sons group began when volunteers asked about  temporary absence programs.
   Despite letters of support from the London District  Chiefs Council and
   the Oneida chief, Maplehurst revoked the activists' volunteer status and
   cancelled the native group in September.
   Frustrated by the red tape and barriers that have been put in his way,
   Doxtator decided words weren't enough. He would starve until officials
   listened.
   He wants the volunteers reinstated and a temporary absence program
   established at Maplehurst. He's calling for  provincial jails to follow
   federal prison directives which guarantee access to native spirituality
   programs.
   Ontario Correctional Services Minister Rob Sampson  hasn't received
   Doxtator's letter but will take his fast seriously,  ministry
   spokesperson Ross Virgo said. Virgo stressed the ministry is "sensitive"
   to native needs, offering programs if "practicable."
   That's not enough, says Doxtator. He calls it a  matter of freedom of religion.
   Christian inmates have access to spiritual services 52 times a year. But
   native inmates are lucky to have access to their services four times a
   year, he said.
   Doxtator won't talk about death. But he ends his letter with a phrase
   from the native boy:
   Sometimes big sacrifices are needed to make big change.
   --
   Copyright 1999, The London Free Press Unauthorized
   reproduction prohibited.
  
   Memo: To discuss the opinions of Julie Carl call   667-4596.
   Outside the London dialing area call 1-800-265-4105,
  
   extension 4596. Write her at The London Free Press,
   P.O.  Box 2280, London, Ont. N6A 4G1 or fax 667-4528 or
   e-mail   jcarl@lfpress.com   
   --
   Harold P. Koehler, 43 Napoleon Drive, London  ON 
   N5V 4A8 CANADA
   E-mail   hkoehler@execulink.com
   Home page 
   http://www.execulink.com/~hkoehler/index.htm
   Sacred Assembly '97
   http://www.execulink.com/~hkoehler/sacred97/
   Voice (519)453-5452,  Fax 453-3676

**********

Date: Wed, 13 Oct 1999
Towns press Congress on tribal recognition bill

NEW LONDON, Conn. -- Three southeastern Connecticut towns are calling on Congress to kill proposed legislation that would streamline the federal recognition process for Indian tribes.

Associated Press in the Boston Globe.

http://www.boston.com/dailynews/286/region/Towns_press_Congress_on_tribalP.shtml
Towns press Congress on tribal recognition bill

   By Associated Press, 10/13/99 08:18

   NEW LONDON, Conn. (AP) Three southeastern Connecticut are calling on
   Congress to kill proposed legislation that would streamline the federal recognition
   process for Indian tribes.

   The House Resource Committee is reviewing a bill that would revamp the current
   tribal recognition process before the Bureau of Indian Affairs by creating a
   three-member panel to decide recognition claims by tribes.

   Ledyard, North Stonington and Preston, through their Washington D.C., lawyers,
   Perkins Coie, said testimony submitted last week that a big concerns with the bill is
   a proposed change in how tribes prove their lineage.


   The new rules would eliminate much of the historical evidence for ''tribal
   continuity,'' which current regulations require.

   Tribes seeking federal recognition must be able to trace their roots to the early
   years of American colonization.

   The proposed rules would allow petitioning tribes to trace their roots back only to
   the early part of this century.

   Preston, Ledyard and North Stonington have collectively spent about $120,000
  opposing efforts by the Paucatuck Eastern Pequots and the Eastern Pequots to
  gain federal recognition.

   The three towns have also had a running dispute with the Mashantucket Pequots
  over annexation of land.

Reprinted under the Fair Use
http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html
doctrine of international copyright law.

*************

HARRIS' CONTINUING ABUSE OF POWER STRENGTHENS SUPPORT FOR AN INQUIRY.

FEDERAL & INTERNATIONAL STRATEGIES UNFOLD, TO DEAL WITH DERELICTION OF
RESPONSIBILITY.


"The Ontario government is under suspicion by  the United Nations Human
Rights Committee, the UN's Special Rapporteur on Extrajudicial Executions,
and  Amnesty International of having committed grave human rights abuses
during its handling of the September, 1995 Aboriginal Rights protest at
Ipperwash Park," said Ann Pohl, a non-Aboriginal Spokesperson for the
Coalition. "Even the Ontario Ombudsman is alarmed!"

For the entire story...click over to our Native Canadians   page

***********

Wednesday, October 13, 1999 1:52 PM
nasu: OSU position announcement

  From: Sho.Shigeoka@orst.edu

  There's a position in our office, Minority Education Office,
  for the Indian Education Office.  I'd appreciate it if you could please
pass this onto those who are interested in
  working with Native American students in higher edudation.

  Sho Shigeoka
  Coordinator
  Asian/Pacific American Education Office
  200 Kerr Admn Bldg
  Oregon State University
  Corvallis, OR 97331-2133
  (541) 737-9033 or 1-800-291-4192
  (541) 737-7874 (fax)

  Oregon State University
  Coordinator, Indian Education Office
  Position Announcement
  Indian Programs at OSU

  OSU currently enrolls more than 200 American Indian/Alaskan
  Native students, and offers students a wide variety of
  support services,  financial aid opportunities, and
  mentoring programs including the highly successful Native
  Americans in Marine and Space Sciences.  OSU's chapter
  of the American Indians in Science and Engineering Society
  has consistently placed in the top in the nation, and the
  university has also achieved recognition for programs such
  as the Science and Math Investigative Learning Experience
  program working with younger students in Indian communities.
  Innovative courses such as Ecosystems of Pacific Northwest
  Indians are taught by experts from the Indian community, and
  Native American studies is now available as an academic area
  of specialization through OSU's Ethnic Studies department.
  Community life centers around the Native American Longhouse,
  one of four cultural centers for students of color on
  campus.  The university also has a Multicultural Affairs
  Office and a Minority Education Office, which houses three
  other minority education offices in addition to the Indian
  Education Office.

  The Indian Education Office
  The Indian Education Office was established in 1991 as the
  first of the four offices now located in the Minority
  Education Office.  The IEO and its coordinator have the
  following responsibilities:
  *       Service to Indian students: providing counseling and
  advising, coordinating tutoring, financial aid, and other
  services, coordinating and assisting recruitment and
  retention efforts, maintaining liaison with the Longhouse
  and Native student organizations.
  *       Service to Indian communities: maintaining liaison
  with tribal and community groups and regional and national
  Indian organizations, serving as a central resource for
  tribal education officers and others seeking help and
  information about Indian programs and services at the
  university.
  While the office and many of its primary functions are
  located on campus, the coordinator is also responsible for
  on site recruitment and liaison efforts in Indian
  communities throughout the state and region.
  *       Coordination of campus programs: maintaining liaison
  with other Indian programs and other service units on
  campus, assisting other campus units serving Indian students
  and preparing grant proposals involving Indian students and
  communities, and maintaining accurate statistics on the
  campus Indian community. The office also coordinates the
  activities of the Camas Coalition, an on-campus coalition of
  units working with Indian students and community
  representatives.  The coordinator also participates in the
  joint operations of the Minority Education Office,
  addressing the common needs of students of color at the
  university.
  *       Additional opportunities: depending upon the
  interests and skills of the coordinator, other functions
  might include more extensive involvement in statewide Indian
  education programs at the K-12 and community college levels
  and the development of closer relations with tribal
  colleges.
  The coordinator position is a 12-month appointment,
  reporting to the Vice-Provost for Student Affairs.

  Qualifications
  A Bachelors degree is required, and advanced degrees and/or
  extensive experience in Indian education are desirable.
  Counseling, administrative and grant writing experience in
  higher education are also highly desirable.  Demonstrated
  record of successful work in education and with Indian
  communities is essential.  Competitive salary and benefits
  package.

  Application Procedure
  Please forward a cover letter, curriculum vita, and at least
  two letters of reference (one, if possible, documenting work
  with Indian communities) to
  IEO Search Committee
  Minority Education Office
  A200 Kerr Administration Bldg.
  Oregon State University
  Corvallis Oregon, 97331-2133

  For first consideration, all materials must be received by
  November 1, 1999.  Starting date will be as early as January
  1, 1999. For further application information, call Rose
  Lacey (541) 737-9030, or email <Rose.Lacey@orst.edu

  For updated information, see our website at
  <http://osu.orst.edu/Dept/indianed

  OSU is an AA/EEO employer and has a policy of being
  responsive to dual-career needs.
  <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
                       David Lewis
                       P.O. Box 3086
                       Eugene, OR 97403
   coyotez@darkwing.uoregon.edu, coyotez@oregon.uoregon.edu
               http://gladstone.uoregon.edu/~coyotez
 

************

OCTOBER 12, 1999
   Letter From The Jatibonicu Taino Tribal Nation, To:
   All Native American Tribes And Nations.

 
   :                 The Taino Tribal Council of Jatibonicu'
   :                     US Regional Tribal Affairs Office
   :                            703 South Eight Street
   :                          Vineland New Jersey 08360
   :
   :
   October 12,1999
   Tau Ah Taiguey Adanatiao,
   Hello and Good  Day to All Our Relatives,
 
        We bid you a warm greeting from The Jatibonicu Taino Tribe, its
   Telcesta Florida Tribal Band, the Taino People, and its' Nation.  I will
   speak my heart so that all of my relatives will understand that I, Guanikeyu
   (Noble Bird of The White Earth), Principal Chief of The Taino Tribe speaks
   the truth in the eyes of our Creator the Great Spirit.
        It has been 507 years since our Taino National Homeland of the
   Caribbean, Bahama Islands and Florida were invaded and overthrown by the
   Spanish Europeans in 1493.  As peaceful people, we stood by and observed the
   destruction of our Atabey (Mother Earth) and our ancestral ceremonial
   grounds.  With chains on our hands and feet, we stood alone without the
   power to protect ourselves.  The souls of the Taino people cried out in pain
   and anguish as our daughters were being raped and our people became the
   victims of mass genocide.  A conservative estimate of three to six million
   Tainos died due to the intentional introduction of many new European
   diseases. Our ancestral blood fell upon our land like rain drops into a red
   river of blood, that was caused by the Spaniard's Bull Mastiff hunting dogs
   and their bloody Toledo swords. Many of our relatives of other Native American
   Nations do not remember our Taino People, the first nation to encounter Columbus
   on the morning of October 12, 1492, in the Caribbean Bahama Island of
   Guanahani (San Salvador).  We have been waiting patiently for the
   completion of our Taino 500 year prophecy.  The prophecy states that we the
   Taino people would reemerge after 500 years as a proud and noble
   Nation. This would come to pass within our traditional homelands in the sixth
   generation of our Arocoels (Elders or grandparents) in the year 1993.
        Presently, The Taino Jatibonicu (Great People of the Sacred High
   Waters) Tribe and its Tekesta  (People of the Good Earth) Tribal Band of
   Bimini (Mother of Many Waters, the original name of Florida in the Taino
   language)  must beg to our relatives of the other Tribes and Nations to come
   to our aid.  Our Taino ceremonial grounds in Bimini has fallen into the
   hands of a group of private business people.  We have been in a struggle to
   reaffirm and preserve our traditional Taino cultural heritage within our
   Bimini and Circum- Caribbean Island  homeland.  Our Tekesta Taino Tribal
   Band of Bimini Florida, currently is struggling to help gather the needed
   funding of 8.7 million dollars to buy back one of the most sacred and
   ancient ceremonial grounds found within North America. This site is better
   known in the local Florida newspapers, as The Miami Circle.
         It seems that a local business person, insensitive to our native
   spirituality, would like to destroy our sacred ceremonial center.  He plans
   to built a new high rise apartment complex upon the bones of our ancestors.
   The Miami Circle is known to our people as the Navel of Amikekia (name of
   Turtle Island or America in the Taino language). This Taino ancestral
   ceremonial site belongs to all the indigenous people of the Americas.
        According to The Taino Book of Prophecies, the destruction of this
   sacred site by the Guamikena (The Covered People, name give by the Tainos to
   the Europeans) would come to trigger a natural disaster as never seen on
   Turtle Island since the dawn of its creation.  This is prophesied to happen
   in the seventh generation on or about the year 2005. We can humbly say that
   our Taino Jatibonicu Tribe and its two tribal Bands are the poorest of the
   Tribal Nations of Turtle Island.  As you already know, all our tribal
   homelands were lost to the past European colonial powers.  We, further, must
   inform our brothers and sisters that within sixty days we must find a way to
   buy back our land from this Guamikena business man located in Dade County
   southern Florida. Our Tribe has never begged nor asked anything from our
   relatives of Turtle Island.  We must stress upon our relatives the
   importance of preserving this sacred site. The destruction of this site will
   effect all our families here on Turtle Island.
        We ask that you open your hearts to the pleas of our Tribe and its Band
   here in Florida.  We ask that you share, in the matum (generosity)   Native
   American way, of sharing whatever money your Tribes and Nations can spare to
   aid us in this most noble struggle to preserve our past indigenous heritage.
   It is sad to see in this day and age that what is sacred to the indigenous
   people is not respected by some people.  It is unfortunate that the value of
   our ancestral heritage and indigenous spirituality is not respected by some.
   The only value these people seem to have in their hearts is money and power.
   It seems that, they enjoy running  over, native people, fish and foul and
   breaking up the Sacred Wheel of our Native American way of life.
        It is also sad to note that we as Native Americans, must  now be forced
   to buy back our own lands and sacred sites.  We hope and pray to the Creator
   that our brothers and sisters of Turtle Island will not abandon us in this
   time of need.  We are all one Nation of Amikekia also known as The Caguama
   (The Great Mother Sea Turtle).
 
   Respectfully Yours,
 
   Pedro Guanikeyu Torres
   Cacike/ Principal Chief of the Jatibonicu Taino
   Tribe of Boriken  Puerto Rico
 
   Taino Tribal Council of Jatibonicu Boriken
                       PO Box #253
      Orocovis, Puerto Rico  00720-0253
 
   Karlos Rodriquez
   Nitayno/ Sub-Chief of The Tekesta Taino Tribal Band
   of Bimini Florida
 
   Tekesta Taino Tribal Band of Bimini Florida
                     PO Box #6080
        Deltona, Florida 32728-06080
 
   (C) Copyright: Jatibonicu Taino Tribe of Boriken

**********

Selling out,dignity for dollars; Mi'kmaq Chiefs speak.
Sent: Wednesday, October 11, 1999 7:08 PM


  If your an indian and you have any dignity and want to dump it on the market
  maritime Chiefs and nat,l chief  Phil Fontain are bying and selling at a
  premium.. it is said that if you give up one ounce of liberty for one ounce
  of security,you deserve neither..our chiefs have done that .and in a very
  big way.
  This time in the area of fisheries..they have alowed two birds to be killed
  with one stone ..food fishery under sparrow and the compromise of the
  marshall decission..Our people have been alowed to fish under sparrow since
  the supreme court ruled on it in 1982 ..They in Burnt Church and other
  Indian communities were allowed on the average of 40 to 50 traps per family
  or for food fishery .their food fishery in the months of september and
  october were their most productive perriods, the chiefs have let this all
  get away an thus impossed an economic hard ship on this reserve and others
  like it thus allowing the white man to continue with his season..where is
  the logic..you have only to go to our chiefs for that one..There appears to
  be a terrible oder in the air pay offs and bye outs and anything else that
  might represent the above..How much will end up in the in the wrong hands
  how much will go back to the people if any..To watch these chiefs bow down
  and yeild to the minister of fisheries make,s one sick to one,s stomatch .
       The 600 hundred traps thet was offered to the reserve amounts to .5 or
  a half of a trap per person..
  What was imposed on the indian community should be imposed on the white mans
  community as well,  after all its only fair , we do live in a fair and just sosciety..
    There was a preposal that was put on the table by one cheif that was to be
  implamented, by the band,it stated  that thirty percent of his catch was to
  be given to the band office to be administerd to the band at chief and
  council discression ...this sounds like ,smells like and looks like ,low and
  be hold it is extortion, or else he would not get a liscence to fish under
  the band ..the godfather is more generous then that it is said that fish
  always rots at the head first ...government bare,s that out both on a nat,l
  level and a local level
                                              JOSEPH A.FRANCIS
                                              PO BOX 3  REXTON,N.B.
                                             CANADA,    EOA2LO

***********

John Trudell back on the Rock
  Monday Oct. 11, 1999
  An Indian Poet Rocks on the Rock
  The San Francisco
  http://www.sfgate.com/chronicle/
 
  "It's always good to go home," says American Indian
  poet-performer John Trudell about his recent visit  to the
  Santee Sioux reservation in Nebraska, where he was  born.
  "It's strengthening to see your past and know you  have
  someplace to go where you're part of a people."
 
  Since the late '80s, Trudell has been creating  spoken-word
  rock 'n' roll to articulate his experiences and the  plight
  of Indians. It's raised a cultural consciousness  that's
  much different from his turbulent political past,  one that
  thrust him into the national limelight 30 years ago  as a
  spokesman for the American Indian Movement.
 
  But it was his role as the voice of the 1969-71  Indians of
  All Tribes occupation of Alcatraz that brought  Trudell to
  "lefty" prominence, as he broadcast reports from the  island
  live over KPFA with a portable transmitter. To  commemorate
  the event's 30th anniversary, the performer returns  with
  his band on October 23 for a celebration and  reunion.
  Activist veterans are expected, along with  performers such
  as comedian Charlie Hill, New Mexico vocal ensemble  Ulali
  and the indigenous punk rocker Arrigon Starr. The
  anniversary brings attention to an event that  reintroduced
  indigenous people to the American social conscience
  through   "red power".
 
  During the occupation of Alcatraz, the issues were about
  land, sovereignty and legal realities. Trudell agrees that
  establishing a tribal economic base is a good thing, but
  the struggle is not over.
  "There have been some positive things that have happened
  for the tribes, but it's a constant, vigilant fight about
  protecting what resources we have in terms of land and
  rights. It has improved to some degree for us as humans.
  There's not as much political activism coming out of the
  Native community as there was 25, 30 years ago, but
  there's much more cultural and artistic work taking
  place."

**********

Web-addresses for Wounded Knee and AIM-publications

The AIM and the Wounded Knee documents are all found on
the MSU site as well as the Indian Land Cessions. Additionally,
according to the text from the site the graphic versions will also
be made available in text versions.  That will be great for those
who are yet unable to load large graphics.


***See the paths below.

Michigan State University
http://www.lib.msu.edu/
The American Radicalism Collection
http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/
"The Special Collections Division and the Digital Sources Center of the
Michigan State University Libraries have been scanning documents from
the American Radicalism Collection to make them available electronically.
Some of the documents are also in the process of being made available
in e-text (electronic text) versions, i.e., in HTML or SGML." [According
to our understanding of copyright law, all of the works in this digital
collection are in the public domain, and therefore have no copyright protection.]

Titles in Alphabetical Order
http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/alpha_list.html
Titles by Subject
http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/subj_struct.html
Title: American Indian Movement:file of clippings and miscellanea
http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/aimfile.htm
[MSU Note: Collected at Michigan State University Libraries in
the Special Collections Division's American Radicalism Vertical
File (ARVF)]

Title: Wounded Knee Indian Occupation, 1973
http://www.lib.msu.edu/spc/digital/radicalism/woundedfile.htm

Royce, Charles C. - Indian Land Cessions in the United States:
http://www.lib.msu.edu/digital/Indian_Cessions/index.htm
"Washington, Government Printing Office, 1899."

*************

Mi'kmaq Update: Community torn by anger, racism
Oct. 12, 1999

  by CHRIS MORRIS


  BURNT CHURCH, N.B. (CP) - After years of peaceful coexistence, Burnt
Church today is a community torn by fear, anger and racial tension. "There
was always a little bit of racism here," says Robert Sylliboy, a Mi'kmaq
fisherman and carpenter.

  "It wasn't blown out of proportion but behind your back, you could hear,
'you dirty Indian, go back to the reservation. We don't need you here.' Now,
it's not behind your back, it's to your face."

  The Supreme Court of Canada's decision recognizing a priority right of
Maritime natives to hunt and fish changed more than the legal landscape, it
has fundamentally altered life in this pretty seaside village on New
Brunswick's eastern shore.

Get the FULL Story on our Canadian Native Page - click here

***********

October 12, 1999 12:54 PM
Mi'kmaqs promise to defy new fishing rules
  The Canadian Press, October 11, 1999.
  BRIAN DALY AND CASSANDRA SZKLARSKI

  BURNT CHURCH, N.B. (CP) - At least one Maritime aboriginal band says new
  rules on the native fishery will be broken Monday. Federal Fisheries
  Minister Herb Dhaliwal imposed strict guidelines Sunday on two bands that
  insist on fishing out of season under newly won treaty rights.

  But native fishers in Burnt Church, who are now restricted to setting only
  600 lobster traps, say they plan on setting as many as they want.

  Get the FULL Story on our Canadian Native Page - click here

**********

October 12, 1999 
                   
Liquor Plan by LaMere Sparks Protest

                    BY SUSAN SZALEWSKI
                    WORLD-HERALD STAFF WRITER


                    About 30 people, including members of at least seven American Indian tribes, protested
                    Monday outside the Sioux City, Iowa, American Indian Center.

                    Inside, an audience was gathering to hear Frank LaMere speak of his plan for Indians to
                    obtain a liquor license for an Indian-owned store in Whiteclay, Neb.

                    The plan by LaMere and Russell Means has caused a split among Indian
                    leaders on how to solve the problems of alcohol sales in Whiteclay and
                    alcohol use in the adjoining Pine Ridge
                    Indian Reservation.

                    "Alcohol adversely affects indige-nous peoples as well as all people of the world," Scott
                    Barta, one of the protesters, said in a telephone interview. "All liquor stores should be
                    closed in the (Whiteclay) area."

                    Barta is administrative assistant at the Native American Alcohol Treatment Program in
                    Sergeant Bluff, Iowa.

                    On his way inside the Indian Center, LaMere spoke to the group of demonstrators.
                   According to Barta, the demonstrators asked LaMere if he was retracting his
                   statements on obtaining a liquor license. LaMere said he would not change his position.

                    Protesters included area youths and Reva Barta, national secretary for the American Indian
                    Movement. She is Scott Barta's mother.

                    The protest lasted about 90 minutes. Some of the demonstrators then went inside to hear
                    LaMere.

                    Two Oglala Sioux men were slain in June at the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.

                    The deaths were the catalyst for weekend marches from Pine Ridge, S.D., to Whiteclay, to
                    focus attention on the unsolved slayings and protest the sale of beer in the Nebraska                       village   to reservation residents.

                    Earlier Monday, LaMere was in Omaha to present Millard South High School with a special
                    American Indian ceremonial blanket to recognize the school's decision to drop its Indian
                    mascot.

More Pine Ridge News...Click Here

***********

VICTORY!!! Oceti Sakowin: CPT leaving LaFramboise
SUCCESS!!! OH THANK GOD ALMIGHTY SUCCESS AT LAST!!!

  CPTnet
  Oct. 11, 1999
  PIERRE, SOUTH DAKOTA: CPT Presence at Oceti Sakowin Camp
  Ends with Repeal of First Mitigation Act

  Christian Peacemaker Teams is ending its presence at the Oceti Sakowin Camp
  on La Framboise Island in South Dakota,following the repeal of the first
  Mitigation Act and a new focus by the Oceti Sakowin on other treaty issues
  impacting the Great Sioux Nation.

  On Monday, October 4, about 35 people representing seven bands of the Lakota
  and Dakota kicked off the new focus by meeting Senator Daschle at a boat
  landing. He was touring the river with South Dakota media. Daschle has
  instigated most of the legislation which presently challenges the Treaties,
  and denies the validity of Lakota Treaty rights.

  People stood in the fall sun at the boat ramp, holding signs with messages
  like "Leave our land, you greedy greedy man" and "Mitigation Act is as
  illegal as the Act of 1889." Across the river, others held a tarp with the
  painted message, "Stop the Mitigation [Act], Honor the Treaties."

  Daschle, Senate Minority Leader avoided looking at the gauntlet of Native
  American elders and youth on either side until one Lakota lady stepped in
  front of him. As he shook hands with elders, a Dakota woman, Stella Pretty
  Sounding Flute, explained the group's concerns about violations of treaty
  rights and ended, "You should let us walk this land in peace." He responded
  with a lame, "I appreciate the fact that you feel as strongly as you do.
  Thanks for coming here today."

  On September 30, President Clinton signed a bill which included the repeal
  of Title VI of the Omnibus Appropriations Act of 1999, or the Mitigation
  Act. The repeal was Section 605 of the Energy and Water Development
  Authorization Act.

  Reflecting on the repeal, the media coordinator for the camp, Charmaine
  White Face, said that prayers for the repeal had been answered. The precise
  purpose of the camp has been fulfilled. However she added, there are other
  attacks looming on the Great Sioux Nation's treaties with the U.S. CPT is
  leaving in part to give space for the campers and the Coalition to develop
  this new strategy and focus. Besides serving as a deterrent to harassment
  of the camp by local racists and law enforcement, CPTers have helped
  campers to think about new possibilities for direct action as part of a
  nonviolent struggle. They have partnered with supporters of the camp on
  several public witnesses drawing attention to the violations of treaty rights.

  CPT will maintain contact with the camp and its supporters, the Red Earth
  Coalition, and respond to requests for presence.
  _____________________

  Christian Peacemaker Teams is an initiative among Mennonite and Church of
  the Brethren congregations and Friends Meetings that supports violence
  reduction efforts around the world.  CPT P. O. Box 6508 Chicago, IL 60680
  tel:312-455-1199 FAX 312-432-1213 To join CPTNET, our e-mail network, fill
  out the form found on our WEB page at http://www.prairienet.org/cpt/

***********

Native woman starving to protest squalid conditions
  The Canadian Press, October 11, 1999.
   SUE BAILEY

  OTTAWA (CP) - Yolande Redcalf says she is prepared to die. The 32-year-old
  mother of two, a member of the Sunchild First Nation in Alberta, has
  consumed only water since Aug. 31, she said in an interview. She won't eat
  until a public inquiry is held into how her community's chief and band
  council spend federal government funding, she said by telephone from her
  reserve.

  "I really feel it's time to look into what's happening on reserves.

  "It's heart-breaking for me to have to do this," she said, describing
  provisions she has made for her daughter, 12, and eight-month-old son in a
  will.

  But Redcalf says she won't turn back.

  "Because that would be accepting defeat, and (like) saying what's
happening  on the reserve is okay. And it's not."

  Redcalf's weight has dropped to less than 135 pounds from about 170.

  Weakness, trouble concentrating and dehydration have set in.

  Rhonda Chapman of Calgary was stunned by her sister's appearance when she
  arrived last week to visit.

  "Her gums are turning black and her jaw line is skeletal," she said.
"Sure,  I think Yolande has valid reasons for what she's doing.
  "But we need her here."

  Redcalf, Chapman and two of their sisters were removed as youngsters by
  child welfare workers from their mother's home on the tiny Sunchild
reserve northwest of Red Deer.

  Redcalf grew up with a white family and only returned to the reserve 2½
  years ago.

  It was a rude homecoming.

  Her mother lives in a three-bedroom house with up to 17 relatives at a
time,  Redcalf said. In summer, a sheet or blanket hangs in the front door frame
  because there's no screen door.

  The basement is unfinished and wiring hangs exposed.

  Redcalf's aunt makes do in a decrepit home with a leaky roof,
foul-smelling  water and rotting floor boards.

  The conditions are starkly squalid when compared to new homes which
Redcalf  says are enjoyed by band councillors, their families and friends.

  Financial audits required of the band by Indian Affairs aren't sufficiently
  detailed, she said.

  And Redcalf was turned away by an Indian Affairs allegations officer
because she had no proof.

  "Nobody ever comes forward with the proof because it's impossible to get,"
  she said. "You need someone on the inside to get the proof for you."

  Redcalf planned to complete her second year at University of Alberta
before she and several supporters staged a protest in late August.

  They pitched tents near the Sunchild band office to decry housing
  conditions. Dissatisfied with band council's reaction and bureaucratic
  indifference, Redcalf stopped eating.

  Glenn Luff, spokesman for the Alberta office of Indian Affairs, said the
  band's last independent audit confirmed $175,000 earmarked for housing was
  spent for that purpose.

  But it's up to the chief and band council to decide who gets the money and
  when, he said.

  "We receive allegations all the time from First Nation members," Luff said.
  "And not all of them are valid.

  "I don't know if there's really anything, as a government department, we can
  do about somebody on a hunger strike."

  Sunchild Chief Harry Goodrunning took office last March.

  He's grappling with a reserve jobless rate of 80 per cent, a list of 60
  people awaiting houses, and population growth that will compound both
  problems.

  About 460 of the band's 780 members live on reserve. Housing funds from
  Ottawa help pay for just five new units per year, said Goodrunning.

  But a one-time cash infusion of $288,000 will help pay for several new
  houses, of which two will go to the Redcalf family, he said.

  Redcalf is right about one claim, he added: Federal funds allocated for
  housing have been used in recent years to pay down the band's deficit.

  But Goodrunning blamed that on lack of government funding.

  Houses are provided to those in greatest need, he said.

  Redcalf has received whatever financial information she requested and is
  welcome to view the most recent audit, the chief added.

  Outsiders who come home to the reserve are often disappointed, Goodrunning
  said.

  "It's a lot different from what they expected."

  Redcalf wants Indian Affairs Minister Robert Nault to call a public
inquiry  into the band's books.

  "If one little Indian dying isn't enough to make the Minister of Indian
  Affairs look twice then I guess . . . he doesn't care," she said.

  Calls to the minister's office were not returned.

***********

The Seventh Circle
October 10, 1999

When you enter Rapid City for the first time you are struck with images of industry, tourist
attractions and gaming parlors. There are many new buildings and lots of things to do, without
having to see the tragedies that occur beyond the glitz. Every winter people are dying of
exposure and because they are Indian and hidden their fate means little to the general
population. That must change.

Winter is closing in fast and many people are not equipped withh the necessary clothing.
Winter coats,clothes, gloves hatsand footgear along with socks are going to be desperately
needed. Warm blankets and sleeping bags would also be appreciated. Check out the guest
book for other needed items.

With the extreme poverty of the Reservations,people come to the cities seeking a better life
and are all too often left stranded. The cities are overwhelmed by the numbers of destitute
people and often the shelters can not house everyone. People sleep in abandoned houses,
cars, boxes, under bridges and anywhere they can find some shelter from the elements.
Weather in the plains states can be brutal and even deadly. But weather is not the only killer of
the people, apathy can be just as deadly, we need people to care enough to sacrifice what they
can to help. This is an effort taking place in Rapid City, please read this page carefully and let
your heart do the rest.

All to often indigenous people are turned away from the homeless shelters in Rapid City, South
Dakota because they have been drinking. During the bitter winter that is often a sentence of
death. Alcohol decreases the body's ability to fight hypothermia and as a result they freeze to
death. Until now their only option has been to seek shelter under bridges or in abandoned
houses. They may survive another winter but the problem remains, they have little hope for
anything better in their lives. The Seventh Circle is a non-profit organization, dedicated to
providing the homeless of the Rapid City, S. Dakota area, with affordable housing , restoring
dignity and giving them a foundation rooted in traditional culture. Although it is aimed at the
Native American homeless the program will be open to all that are homeless. There are a few
preconditions: 1.They must be willing to change destructive habits thru traditional methods
and 2. They must be homeless at the time of their application, and 3. They must be willing to
work within the community for everyone's benefit.


The plan would provide the indigent not only with physical shelter, but with a caring
community built around our Native traditional values, culture and religion. We believe that
such a living and learning situation will be especially valuable for the most vulnerable of our
people-- children living in poverty. Without such a cultural background, these children will
have little chance to compete effectively in mainstream culture, with it, they will have the
confidence to learn and master the skills that they will need to survive and prosper. The plan
hinges upon obtaining the surplus military housing at the West Nike site near Ellsworth AFB, S.
Dakota.

And here is a statement from Rick Grey Buffalo Quinn, Founder of the Seventh Circle: The
Seventh Circle is seeking urgently needed help from all generations and peoples. And as
founder of the Seventh Circle, I am working with the homeless. Not only working with the
homeless, but trying to replace things lost or stolen, by replacing homes to the homeless. And
so I thank you.

We are but a small voice crying in the wind. And again, we ask all mankind to help with our
endeavors. Although I cannot come to you I pray my voice will. From the heart of the Dakota
Nation, the housing that I will aquire will be called the "Leonard Peltier Housing Project", In
the spirit of Crazy Horse, it is a dream of Leonard Peltier to provide housing for his people.
Donations of food, clothing and desperately needed funds can be sent to:
The Seventh Circle
c/o Rick Grey Buffalo Quinn,
321 Doolittle Street,
Rapid City S. Dakota 57701,
(605)355-9025 or
605-390-2751
for information via e-mail contact David Hendren at dhendren@mint.net

**********

John Trudell at Peltier Benefit

  Date: Sun, 10 Oct 1999 21:06:53 -0500
 
LEONARD PELTIER BENEFIT AND JOHN TRUDELL BIO

JOHN TRUDELL TO SPEAK AT LEONARD PELTIER DEFENSE COMMITTEE
  BENEFIT CONCERT
 
  Spoken word artist John Trudell, will appear in a benefit concert for The
  Leonard Peltier Defense Committee at the Heartland Cafe on Tuesday,
  Wednesday, and Thursday, October 12, 13, and 14, 1999.

Get the Schedule and Full Story on our Leonard Peltier Page- Click Here

***********

Date: Sun, 10 Oct 1999 22:32:41 -0700 (PDT)
Revoke the Bull "Inter Catera" - Papal  Bulls Burning! 
******************************************************
  
  Dear Relatives:
  
  On behalf of the United Confederation of Taino  People
  (UCTP), we wish to extend our full support to any
  organization or individuals, working toward the
  revocation of the Papal Bulls. We look forward to
  working together in soliderity with any and all who
  are currently engaged in this historic undertaking.
   
  In the Spirit of Our Ancestors,
  Roberto Mucaro Borrero,
  Spokesperson, UCTP
  email: uctp1493@yahoo.com
 

******************************************************

  REVOKING THE BULL "INTER CAETERA" OF MAY 4, 1493
                        
  A movement to revoke the Papal Bull "Inter Caetera"
  was initiated by the Indigenous Law Institute in 1992.
  At the Parliment of World Religions in 1994, over 60
  indigenous delegates drafted a DECLARATION OF VISION.
  It reads, in part:
    
  We call upon the people of conscience in the
  Roman Catholic hierarchy to persuade Pope John II to
  formally revoke the Inter Cetera Bull of May 4, 493,
  which will restore our fundamental human rights.
  That Papal document called for our Nations and Peoples
  to be subjugated so the Christian Empire and its
  doctrines would be propagated. The U.S. Supreme Court
  ruling Johnson v. McIntosh 8 Wheat 543 (in 1823)
  adopted the same principle of subjugation expressed
  in the Inter Cetera Bull. This Papal Bull has been, and 
  continues to be, devastating to our religions, our
  cultures, and the survival of our populations.
  
  WHAT ARE THE "PAPAL BULLS"?
    
  Papal Bulls are decrees or "solemn edicts" granted
  by  the Vatican. The bulls we are concerned with
  essentially sanctioned 15th century Portuguese and
  Spanish genocide campaigns into Africa and the
  Americas. These decrees established Christian dominion
  and subjugation of non-Christian "pagan" peoples and
  their lands (Newcomb, 1992). The 1493 Bull "Inter
  Caetera" granted unlimited rights to Spain, and the
  subsequent 1494 "Treaty of Tordesillas" (inspired by
  the Bull "Inter Caetera") divided the world in half,
  everything 370 leagues west of the Cape Verde islands
  went to Spain, everything east went to Portugal (Gottschalk, 1927).
  
  Because the Bull "Inter Caetera" concedes rights of
  conquest to both Spain and Portugal, the movement has
  focused on revoking the 1493 document (Newcomb, 1999).
   
  On October 12, 1998, over 50 indigenous and human
  rights advocates gathered in Honolulu, Hawai'i to
  demand the revoking of the 1493 bull and called for
  it to be revoked by the year 2,000. This response
  parallels Pope John Paul II's call that Christianity's
  2,000 anniversary be "a year of mercy," saying "the
  church will seek forgiveness,"  "atonement," and that
  he "wants the church to enter the third millennium
  with a clear conscience" (Associated Press, November 28, 1998).
 
  For more information on the papal bulls movement and
  our annual burning event, please see our website:
    
  http://bullsburning.itgo.com/papbull.htm
  
  INDIGENOUS PEOPLES AND SUPPORTERS, YOU ARE ASKED TO
  CALL UPON PEOPLE OF CONSCIENCE IN THE ROMAN CATHOLIC
  HIERARCHY TO PERSUADE THE VATICAN AND POPE JOHN PAUL
 
  II TO FORMALLY REVOKE THE 1493 BULL "INTER CAETERA."
 

*****************************************************
   
  EMAIL INSTRUCTIONS: Indigenous peoples and supporters
  are asked to symbolically burn copies (or tear them up
  if you wish) of the Bull "Inter Caetera" of May 4,
  1493, provided HERE. Simply print out the message
  and clip off the Bull where it says "cut here."
CLICK HERE to get the entire story and the message!

 
**********

Native Fishery QuickFacts

Some facts on the Aboriginal fishing dispute:

Number of native traps set after the Supreme Court ruling,
compared with the number of commercial traps set annually:

New Brunswick -- Commercial: 600,000. Aboriginal: 5,000.

Prince Edward Island -- Commercial: 400,000.
Aboriginal :3,000.

Nova Scotia -- Commercial: One million. Aboriginal: 4,000.

30 Day Moratorium: 33 of 35 Aboriginal Bands agree.

Dissenting Bands: Burnt Church, N.B., restricted to 600 traps;
Indian Brook, N.S., allowed 800 traps.

East Coast lobster fishery seasons:

    Bay of Fundy: Oct. 14 to Dec. 31.

    Southwest Nova Scotia: Nov. 29 to May 31: .

**********

Native fishermen check salmon stocks on West Coast
  WebPosted Sat Oct 9 11:39:20 1999
 
  VICTORIA - While tensions in the fishery have eased
  somewhat in the East, seven native bands on southern 
  Vancouver Island are literally testing the waters this
  weekend.
 
  Members of half a dozen bands are cooperating on a test
  fishery for pink and chum salmon, checking the condition
  of salmon stocks with the help of a marine biologist.
 
  It will be a small fishery with only two boats out on
  the water, but native leaders say they hope the results
  will show there is enough fish to support the commercial
  fishery.
 
  Native leaders announced their plans to start a limited
  fishery without the permission of the federal Department
  of Fisheries and Oceans last Thursday.
 
  Native fishers hope to keep their test salmon fishery
  peaceful. They say they are not looking for a fight but
  are determined to assert their rights.
 
  The bands have asked the DFO to send an adviser to help
  keep the peace. But Chief Robert Sam says he has no doubt
  the same sorts of problems experienced on the East Coast
  will arise out west.
 
  "We've already got a survival coalition here made up of
  commercial fishermen, and their agenda is to stop any
  aboriginal groups from exercising their rights," Sam said.
 
  Native leaders say that while native fishermen hope to
  make a living, they will put conservation first.
 
  The Department of Fisheries and Oceans says there is no
  scheduled opening this weekend but it has not threatened
  to halt the fishery.
 
  The Fisheries Survival Coalition will be watching
  unhappily from a distance. Its members oppose what they
  see as racially based fisheries and plan to be on the
  water this weekend as well.
 
  Native leaders from the Nanoose First Nation believe
  the recent Marshall ruling, covering the Mi'kmaq in the
  Maritimes, applies to them as well.
 
  Nanoose is covered by the 150-year-old Douglas Treaty,
  which Chief Wayne Edwards says gives members the right
  to fish "as though we were the sole occupants of the land."
 
  A B.C. expert on native issues says that view may well
  be right. But one way or the other, the province or
  Ottawa is obliged to negotiate with bands that want to
  fish out of season.

**********

FSU/Racist mascots/ESPN
 
  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
  10/8/99
 
  CONTACT: Susan Anderson, Coordinator NCRSM-FL.(850) 997-1001
    Vernon Bellecourt, President, NCRSM  (612)889-0796
  Michael Haney, Exec. Dir., NCRSM  (850)997-5988 (Room 213)
 
  Tallahasse, FL.  Native American leaders Michael Haney and Vernon Bellecourt
  met with Sandy D'Alemberte, current Florida State University President, this
  morning, to assess the progress of a plan outlined six years ago.  The plan
  included the creation of an International Center for Indigenous Studies, an
  endowed Chair within this program, and the active recruitment of American
  Indian faculty and students.  Even though a few entry level courses on
  Indigenous Studies were added, both leaders found that, overall, the agreed
  upon plan has not been implemented. An indication of FSU's failure to recruit
  Native American students is blatant at the Law School where out of 638 law
  students only approximately ten are American Indian.  Indian law student Travis
  Trueblood expressed his support for the leaders' demands.
 
           "Implementation of this plan is the least Florida State University can
  do to try to rectify the damage they cause by having an Indian mascot" stated
  Mr. Bellecourt.  The National Coalition in Sports and the Media (NCRSM) upholds
  that as long as Native Americans are viewed as caricatures or people locked in
  the past, the problems that affect Indian people will never be seriously
  addressed.  In addition, the NCRSM, points to numerous studies that demonstrate
  the direct negative effect of these images on Indian children and young
  adults.  Some statistics show that 1 out of 5 Indian children attempt suicide.
  "The FSU mascot is a cancer on one of the best collegiate football teams, that
  permeates the whole University.  We want the tomahawk chop, and the Chief
  Hollywood chants to stop", added Bellecourt.
 
           These leaders and supporters will gather  tomorrow at 8 AM to march
  through four blocks of the FSU campus to the Doak Campbell Stadium where they
  will hold a rally and Press Conference at the South end of the stadium, Gate E.
  The demonstration will be covered by an ESPN crew as part of "Outside the
  lines" a special program on Indian mascots in sports, to be aired November
  16th, 1999 at 7 PM EST.

************

October 09, 1999 12:48 PM
Oceti Sakowin: Janklow, protesters argue

  http://www.yankton.net/stories/100899/new_1008990004.html
  Web posted  Friday, October 8, 1999

  Janklow, Protesters Argue About Land Claims During Boisterous Meeting
  By JOE KAFKA
  Associated Press Writer

  PIERRE -- Congress made treaties with Indian tribes, and
  Congress can break them, Gov. Bill Janklow told a handful
  of protesters Thursday during a feisty session in his Capitol office.

  Raising their voices, the two sides tried to speak over
  each other on several occasions, turning part of the
  meeting into a shouting match.

  The governor's impromptu guests are members of an
  encampment on LaFramboise Island, located on the Missouri
  River between Pierre and Fort Pierre. The group wanted the
  governor to formally acknowledge an 1868 treaty with the
  Sioux as well as the Declaration of Independence and U.S.
  Constitution.

  A copy of the treaty, which set aside the western half of
  South Dakota as Indian lands, was placed on the governor's
  desk for his signature.

  The governor refused to sign, accusing the protesters of
  staging a publicity stunt for bringing reporters.

  The treaty cannot be considered in a vacuum, he said.

  "I have no reason to sign it," Janklow said. "I uphold the
  Constitution and the laws of the United States."

  Cliff Kindy of North Manchester, Ind., a member of
  Christian Peacemaker Teams who is staying at the camp,
  argued that the treaty does not allow federal transfer of
  land along the river to state government. Two tribes also
  are to receive some of the land.

  "We're inviting you to acknowledge a common history that
  all of us have," Kindy said to the governor. "We're not
  talking about what's law. We're talking about what's
  right."

  Christian Peacemakers is a Chicago-based group that works
  to prevent violence and tries to resolve conflicts.

  "What we're trying to talk about is a nation-to-nation
  agreement that was signed in 1868," Kindy said during
  several minutes of spirited banter with the governor.

  "Your office has been an obstacle to the withholding of
  that agreement between the Great Sioux Nation and the
  United States," Kindy told Janklow.

  Campers have been on LaFramboise Island since March 22 to
  protest the land transfer. The deal, which was brokered by
  Janklow and Sen. Tom Daschle a couple years ago, violates
  treaties, protesters argue.

  Congress passed a law last year returning land taken
  decades ago for Missouri River dams.

  The act makes the state and the Cheyenne River and Lower
  Brule Sioux responsible for environmental protection and
  development along the Missouri River virtually all the way
  from North Dakota to Nebraska.

  Janklow has said the state and tribes can manage the land
  cheaper than the federal government and improve recreational
  access to the river.

  Although protesters said the transfer law violates the 1868
  treaty, Janklow said there is a century-long history of the
  U.S. Supreme Court upholding the power of Congress to pass
  laws affecting treaties.

  "The power to make a treaty is the power to follow a
  treaty," the governor said.

  Under the Constitution, the Supreme Court has the final say
  on all laws and treaties, he said.

  "The Constitution predates any treaty," he told the
  protesters crowded into his office.

  The Black Hills and much of the rest of western South
  Dakota was reserved for the Sioux in the Fort Laramie
  Treaty of 1868. After gold was discovered in the Black
  Hills, the land was taken back in 1877 and Indians were
  forced onto smaller reservations.

  The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 1980 that the federal
  government improperly confiscated the land, awarding
  financial damages. With interest, the sum has now grown to
  several hundred million dollars, but the tribes have
  refused to accept it.

  The justices did not say the land must be returned to the
  Sioux.

  Janklow told protesters Thursday that an 1825 Sioux treaty
  acknowledged the supremacy of the United States and that
  the tribe lived within U.S. territory. He also said the
  U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 1903 that Congress can break
  treaties.

  "I will not allow you to single out one treaty," Janklow
  told his wary guests. "You have to look at all the
  treaties. You have to look at all the laws and the
  Constitution."

  A dozen or so campers stay on LaFramboise Island. They are
  allowed by the Corps of Engineers to stay even though
  camping there is off-limits to others.

  "I'm concerned that we all respect the laws of our
  country," said Joanne Kaufman of Chicago, another Christian
  Peacemaker. Treaties are the supreme law of the land and
  courts must follow them, she told Janklow.

  "A treaty, under the auspices of nation-to-nation
  relationship, is what binds all of us to respect that
  treaty," Kaufman said. "How can the state of South Dakota
  take treaty land ... by an act of the United States
  Congress?"

  The act transfers about 158,000 acres of shoreline from
  Corps of Engineers control to the state and two tribes.

  Opponents said changes in the 1868 treaty must first be
  approved by descendants of all the tribes that signed it,
  not just the Lower Brule and Cheyenne River Sioux.

  The controversial land varies in width on the shoreline
  along both sides of the river. The transfer is to compensate
  the state and tribes for more than 400,000 acres of flooded
  wildlife habitat when the dams were built.

  The state wants to plant trees and fix deteriorating boat
  ramps, campgrounds and other recreational facilities along
  the river.

  The new law also creates a trust fund to give the state and
  tribes money to manage the land.

************

Mi'maq Update 10/08/99  
 
  Friday October 8 4:20 PM ET
 
Warriors Are Symbol Of Native Militancy In Canada
 
  By Andrea Hopkins
 
  BURNT CHURCH, New Brunswick (Reuters) - The Mi'kmaq warrior
  pulled down his camouflage mask and stubbed out his
  cigarette when the word came that a mob of white fishermen
  was ready to attack the wharf he had sworn to defend.
 
  The whites never came -- it had been a false alarm.
  But  later, hunkered beside a smoky campfire, the warrior
  named  Gerald passed a marijuana joint and explained he was
  ready  to sacrifice his life to protect the rights of aboriginals
  in Atlantic Canada to fish out of season.
 
  "I am ready to die tonight," he said quietly, the light of
  the fire flickering over his fatigues and dark eyes. "I
  will die an Indian, proud. Not ashamed."
 
  Gerald and the other young members of the Mi'kmaq Warrior
  Society reminisced about the past standoffs and
  confrontations they've taken part in, and discussed the
  state of native rights in Canada.
 
  The image of Indians dressed for combat occupying or
  blockading public property -- a wharf, a bridge, a
  government office, a golf course -- has become the
  symbol  of native militancy in Canada in the past 10 years.
 
  In Burnt Church, an impoverished Indian reserve overlooking
  the rich Miramichi Bay lobster grounds, the warriors were
  called in this week. This time to guard native fisherman
  from the rage of the whites with whom they share the
  fishery.
 
  In September, the Supreme Court of Canada, based on old
  treaty rights, ruled natives could harvest Atlantic
  Canada's fisheries without license or limit.
 
  Since then, nonnatives, worried about a depleted resource,
  have become increasingly frustrated as Indians have set
  their lobster traps off season while the whites sit idle on
  shore.
 
  Last Sunday the situation changed from tense to violent and
  several natives were hurt. The warriors were called. They
  came from across New Brunswick, mostly men, members
  of the  formal but secretive militia organized years ago to
  protect  the East Coast Mi'kmaq and their property from
  outsiders.
 
  Gary, who would not reveal his last name, has spent the past
  few nights vigilantly patrolling the Burnt Church reserve.
  He had intended to go on a hunting trip.
 
  "Then I got the phone call from the war chief," he said
  matter-of-factly as he searched the blackness from a pickup
  beside the dark Burnt Church wharf.
 
  When the call came, he dropped everything, left his home on
  the Big Cove Indian reserve in eastern New Brunswick and
  drove north to Burnt Church and into the middle of a the dispute.
 
  Twenty to thirty others joined him. They donned fatigues
  and traditional headbands, erected tepees along the fishing
  wharf, and hoisted the blood-red warrior flag overhead.
 
  "I used the term loosely, but we own it (the wharf) for
  now," said Clifford Larry, one of the war chiefs for Burnt
  Church. "It is still a government wharf, and we'll honor
  that, but right now we are here."
 
  Little is known about the warrior societies that take over
  as guardians when disputes get ugly.
 
  In Canada's most famous modern showdown between natives and
  authorities, the 1990 Oka standoff in Quebec, Mohawk
 
  warriors held security forces at bay for 11 weeks.
  During the crisis a police officer was killed.
 
  The drama blew up when Quebec police stormed a roadblock
  set up by Mohawks near the village of Oka, near Montreal.
  The Indians were trying to stop the local municipal council
  from extending a golf course onto their ancestral lands.
 
  The standoff, which ended after the Mohawks surrendered to
  Canadian armed forces, heralded a new militancy among
  Canada's natives and left a bitter legacy.
 
  "The warriors are very specifically chosen -- they are not
  called up from within the ranks. It is an honor bestowed
  upon those who have the diplomatic qualities needed to do
  that job," said Krystyna Sieciechowicz, who studies native
  culture as a professor of anthropology at the University of
  Toronto.
 
  "They are called warriors but they are really diplomats,"
  she said. "They have a dual role, they do the negotiating
  (during a standoff), but at the same time they will go to
  battle if the chiefs decide."
 
  War chief Larry said the job is simple.
 
  "We are the protectors of the people. There are these
  others, the RCMP, the police, but we are a sovereign
  nation, and have our own protectors," he said.
 
  He added the warriors do not decide when they are needed,
  but respond only when asked to do so. "Our values have to
  reflect the community's values. If the community asks us to
  stand down, we go home."
 
  In Burnt Church, the warriors mingle with natives from the
  reserve. Everyone is welcome at the informal blockade but
  warriors prevent reporters from going onto the wharf, where
  native fishermen continued Friday to ply their trade.
 
  At a standoff like Burnt Church, the warriors are supported
  by the community. Coffee and sandwiches, cigarettes, warm
  gloves flow to the front lines, and expenses like gas and
  lodging are often funded by neighboring tribes.
 
  "I feel safer with my own people than I do with them (the
  RCMP)," said Lorna Augustine, a young native from Big Cove.
  "I'm glad they are here."
 
  The warriors declined to say if they are armed.
 
  One young warrior, wearing crisscrossed black ammunition
  belts across his thin chest, peeked into one of the long
  thin pockets on one belt. Catching a reporter watching, he
  pulled up the corner of a candy bar.
 
  "Butterfinger," he said with a wide smile, before pushing
  the chocolate back into hiding.

***********

Friday, October 08, 1999
  National Post Online:
  http://www.nationalpost.com/news.asp?s2=national&f=991008/97495.html
 
  Mi'kmaq band rejects 30-day   moratorium on fishing lobster 
Burnt church breaks rank

 
  Graeme Hamilton
  National Post
 
  BURNT CHURCH,
  N.B. - The Mi'kmaq
  community at the heart of the native  dispute in the Maritimes rejected an
  appeal from their grand chief yesterday  and decided to continue fishing.
 
  "The decision has been made here that  they are not going to come out of the
  water," Alex Dedam, a band spokesman,  said as a hastily
  convened community meeting ended. "They intend to continue to
  exercise their aboriginal right, which has been confirmed by the
  Supreme Court of Canada and is protected by the Constitution Act
  of Canada, and they feel to do anything else would be criminal."
 
  The decision, made behind closed doors and described as
  unanimous, came a day after chiefs from all 35 Atlantic Canada
  reserves agreed to ask fishermen to stop fishing for 30 days in an
  effort to calm tensions. The chiefs were heeding the advice of Ben
  Sylliboy, grand chief of the Mi'kmaq nation, who said restraint was
  needed for the safety of his people.
 
  Non-native fishermen in the Miramichi Bay area, who maintain that
  the off-season native fishery threatens lobster stocks, were stunned
  to learn Burnt Church had broken ranks. Mike Belliveau, executive
  secretary of the Maritime Fishermen's Union, said Ottawa will now
  have to intervene to defuse the crisis.
 
  "There's a basic issue of peace, order and good government, and
  that's something that's beyond us. No Canadians can afford to live
  in the atmosphere that's here," he said.
 
  Herb Dhaliwal, the Fisheries Minister, was scheduled to announce
  what action he will take to regulate the native fishery but postponed
  the announcement to wait for tomorrow's deadline imposed by the
  chiefs. "All parties should stay calm and play it day by day," Mr.
  Dhaliwal said. "We should not jump to conclusions but should give
  co-operation a chance."
 
  But on the impoverished Burnt Church reserve, home to 1,200
  people, defiant fishermen said they will ignore any orders from the
  federal government. "We're not going to stay home and live off
  welfare. We need lobsters to survive," Clarence Dedam said.
  "We're going to keep going back no matter what." He accused the
  grand chief of cowardice for proposing the moratorium and said he
  is not worried about confrontations on the water.
 
  "If we have to fight, we will fight, that's all I can say," he said.
 
  In a Sept. 17 ruling that acquitted Donald Marshall Jr. of illegally
  selling eels, the Supreme Court ruled that a 1760 treaty gives
  natives in the Maritimes the right to earn a "moderate livelihood"
  from fishing, hunting and gathering.
 
  The band council has ordered 1,000 new lobster traps after a flotilla
  of non-native fishing boats cleared the waters of an estimated 3,500
  native-owned traps on Sunday. The sabotage has provoked a
  number of acts of violence. Three native youths were hospitalized
  after their pickup truck was rammed by a van driven by a
  non-native. Arson has destroyed a ceremonial arbour as well as two
  trucks and a cottage belonging to non-natives. And non-native
  fishermen vandalized three fish plants suspected of buying
  native-caught lobster. The RCMP is continuing to investigate all of
  the incidents.
 
  Chris Bonnell, a band councillor and fisherman, said that suspending
  the fishery now would have sent the wrong message. "The people
  are saying, 'Why should we bow down to the vigilantes who have
  cut our traps? If we do stop, they have won.'"
 
  But another councillor, Vernon Mitchell, said he shares the grand
  chief's concern for his people's safety. He said about a dozen
  fishermen from the reserve pulled their traps yesterday as a display
  of goodwill but about 50 continue to fish.
 
  "I'm worried, of course I am," he said, adding that he will try to
  persuade others that they won't be abandoning their treaty rights if
  they agree to a shut down.
 
  The Big Cove, N.B., reserve, which has several fishing boats
  operating out of Burnt Church, is expected to decide today whether  to stop fishing.

************

Jamaica's Catholic Church repents
 
  Oct 08 1999
  Source: Reuters
 
  Jamaica Church
  KINGSTON, Jamaica -- Jamaica's Catholic Church is going to
  repent for its role in the nation's history of slavery and
  genocide of the indigenous Arawak population.
 
  The Catholic Archdiocese of Kingston has issued a statement
  promising the day of repentance on October 17th.
 
  The church says it has "Not, often, been mindful or
  charitable in our Christian crusade."
 
  The church said that it arrived at that conclusion while
  reflecting on its history in preparing itself for the new
  millennium.
 
  Against that background, the Catholics said they would
  host an ecumenical service at the site of the Cenotaph in
  Spanish Town, Jamaica's capital during most of its
  colonial history.
 
  Catholic leaders invited other religious denominations to
  participate, as well as modern-day Maroons, descendants of
  runaway African slaves who lived in Jamaica's mountains
  and battled its white planters.

***********

07 Oct 1999 10:57:59 +0000
From: Indigenous Environmental Network <ien@igc.org
Mohawk leaders promise fight against plutonium

For your information:

                             National News
                 Calgary Herald      Front Page

        Mohawk leaders promise fight against plutonium
                             DONALD MCKENZIE


KAHNAWAKE, Que. (CP) - Mohawk leaders promised Friday
their communities will use "human resistance" to stop the
shipment of plutonium through native territory. Atomic
Energy of Canada is planning to move up to 50 tonnes of
fuel containing plutonium along the St. Lawrence Seaway
before it reaches its final destination of Chalk River,
Ont.

Part of the route would go through Mohawk territory on the
Kahnawake reserve south of Montreal and the Akwesasne
reserve which straddles Quebec, Ontario and New York state.

Mohawk leaders warned they won't let the plutonium pass.
It is expected to arrive in Canada from Russia in November.

"We will use every means possible to prevent it from coming
through our territory," Joe Norton, grand chief of the
Kahnawake Mohawks, told a news conference.

Norton and Akwesasne Grand Chief Mike Mitchell both referred
to the nuclear accident in Japan on Thursday when 55 people
were exposed to radiation at a uranium-processing plant.
Three people were listed in serious condition and given
little chance of survival.

"We feel no reassurance that the kind of precautions and
safety measures that are being taken will in any way prevent
something happening," Norton said.

Mitchell said the Mohawks hope "common sense" will prevail.
But if the plan goes ahead, court action is a possibility.
And if that doesn't work, "human resistance" will be next,
Mitchell said.

Asked to be more specific, he said: "That speaks pretty
clear, what that would mean - humans getting together and
resisting. We don't wish to participate in one big
experiment hosted by Canada."

Mitchell said there is also a danger that the ship could run
aground before it reaches Cornwall, Ont., because of lower
water levels in the St. Lawrence.

Norton, meanwhile, raised the possibility that terrorists
might be interested in hijacking the ship. He also urged all
Canadians to voice their opposition to the plan.

"Canadians in general are too damned complacent," Norton
said. "They just sit back and allow things to happen."

Transport Canada official John Read said Atomic Energy of
Canada has filed a request to get the federal agency to
approve its emergency response plan.

Read said Canadians have until Oct. 15 to make their
comments known on the idea. Transport Canada will decide by
Oct. 29 whether to grant permission.

Read said not enough plutonium is being shipped for
explosions to be a possibility.

"To have a critical mass, you need four kilograms, 4,000
grams," he said from Ottawa. "What's involved is 132 grams.
So, for this shipment, we've dismissed the possibility."

The ship will sail from St. Petersburg to Cornwall, where
the contents will be shipped by road to a nuclear-research
facility in Chalk River in the Ottawa Valley.

Norton said that if the mission goes off without a hitch,
federal officials might be encouraged to allow Canada to
become a dumping ground for nuclear waste from abroad.

Larry White, a member of the Akwesasne emergency
preparedness team, said the plutonium will likely be shipped
in November.

© The Canadian Press, 1999

***********

EAST COAST INDIAN FISH WAR ESCALATING
 
 
   UPDATE:  BAND COUNCIL CHIEFS AGREE TO 30 DAY MORITORIUM - BUT MI'KMAQ,
  MALISEET AND PASSAMAQUODDY PEOPLE CONTINUE TO FISH -
  NON-NATIVES READY  TO ATTACKED INDIANS - Free fish dinner for anyone
  who shows up to help the Indians
 
  CANADIAN SUPREME COURT AFFIRMS INDIGENOUS FISHING
  RIGHTS IN DONALD MARSHALL RULING - Canadian Government Allows Mobs to
  Attack Indians and Destroy Their Property
 
  MNN Mohawk Nation News.  Kahnawake of Mohawk
  Territory.  7 Oct. 99. On October 6th Canadian Minister of Fisheries, Herb
  Dhaliwal met with the chiefs.  He tried to persuade the Indians to give in
  to mob rule by asking them to pull their traps for 30 days to give
  the non-natives a chance to cool down.  The chiefs agreed to have a
  self-imposed 30 day moritorium.  "The chiefs agreed but we the people
  did not", said many of the people.  So today they are back on the water
  fishing while another mob forms to attack them.

FULL STORY.....Click Here

***********

FCNL special alert to Native American
 
Legislative Update recipients
Wed, 6 Oct 1999
 
  As a disproportionate amount of U.S. nuclear testing has historically taken
  place in and around Indian Country, I am forwarding this emergency alert on
  the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty to Native American Legislative Updates
  list recipients.  If this issue is of concern to you, please read on, and
  be sure to check the list of key senators to contact below--yours may be a
  critical swing vote.
 
  Thanks,
  Aura Kanegis
  FCNL Legislative Associate for Native American
  Affairs

For Full Information and what you can do...click over to the Petitions Page

*************

Janklow, Protesters Argue About Land Claims During Boisterous Meeting   

   By JOE KAFKA 
Associated Press Writer 

PIERRE -- Congress made treaties with Indian tribes, and Congress can break
them, Gov. Bill Janklow told a handful of protesters Thursday during a
feisty session in his Capitol office.

Raising their voices, the two sides tried to speak over each other on
several occasions, turning part of the meeting into a shouting match.

The governor's impromptu guests are members of an encampment on LaFramboise
Island, located on the Missouri River between Pierre and Fort Pierre. The
group wanted the governor to formally acknowledge an 1868 treaty with the
Sioux as well as the Declaration of Independence and U.S. Constitution.

A copy of the treaty, which set aside the western half of South Dakota as
Indian lands, was placed on the governor's desk for his signature.

The governor refused to sign, accusing the protesters of staging a
publicity stunt for bringing reporters.

The treaty cannot be considered in a vacuum, he said.

''I have no reason to sign it,'' Janklow said. ''I uphold the Constitution
and the laws of the United States.''

Cliff Kindy of North Manchester, Ind., a member of Christian Peacemaker
Teams who is staying at the camp, argued that the treaty does not allow
federal transfer of land along the river to state government. Two tribes
also are to receive some of the land.

''We're inviting you to acknowledge a common history that all of us have,''
Kindy said to the governor. ''We're not talking about what's law. We're
talking about what's right.''

Christian Peacemakers is a Chicago-based group that works to prevent
violence and tries to resolve conflicts.

''What we're trying to talk about is a nation-to-nation agreement that was
signed in 1868,'' Kindy said during several minutes of spirited banter with
the governor.

''Your office has been an obstacle to the withholding of that agreement
between the Great Sioux Nation and the United States,'' Kindy told Janklow.

Campers have been on LaFramboise Island since March 22 to
protest the land transfer. The deal, which was brokered by Janklow and
Sen. Tom Daschle a couple years ago, violates treaties, protesters argue.

Congress passed a law last year returning land taken decades ago for
Missouri River dams.

The act makes the state and the Cheyenne River and Lower
Brule Sioux responsible for environmental protection and
development along the Missouri River virtually all the way from
North Dakota to Nebraska.

Janklow has said the state and tribes can manage the land
cheaper than the federal government and improve recreational
access to the river.

Although protesters said the transfer law violates the 1868
treaty, Janklow said there is a century-long history of the U.S.
Supreme Court upholding the power of Congress to pass
laws affecting treaties.

''The power to make a treaty is the power to follow a treaty,'' the
governor said.

Under the Constitution, the Supreme Court has the final say
on all laws and treaties, he said.

''The Constitution predates any treaty,'' he told the protesters crowded
into his office.

The Black Hills and much of the rest of western South Dakota was reserved
for the Sioux in the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1868. After gold was discovered
in the Black Hills, the land was taken back in 1877 and Indians were forced
onto smaller reservations.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 1980 that the federal government improperly
confiscated the land, awarding financial damages. With interest, the sum
has now grown to several hundred million dollars, but the tribes have
refused to accept it.

The justices did not say the land must be returned to the Sioux.

Janklow told protesters Thursday that an 1825 Sioux treaty acknowledged the
supremacy of the United States and that the tribe lived within U.S.
territory. He also said the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 1903 that Congress
can break treaties.

''I will not allow you to single out one treaty,'' Janklow
told his wary guests. ''You have to look at all the treaties. You
have to look at all the laws and the Constitution.''

A dozen or so campers stay on LaFramboise Island. They are
allowed by the Corps of Engineers to stay even though camping there
is off-limits to others.

''I'm concerned that we all respect the laws of our country,'' said Joanne
Kaufman of Chicago, another Christian Peacemaker. Treaties
are the supreme law of the land and courts must follow them, she told
Janklow.

''A treaty, under the auspices of nation-to-nation relationship, is what
binds all of us to respect that treaty,'' Kaufman said.
''How can the state of South Dakota take treaty land ... by an act of the
United States Congress?''

The act transfers about 158,000 acres of shoreline from Corps of Engineers
control to the state and two tribes.

Opponents said changes in the 1868 treaty must first be approved by
descendants of all the tribes that signed it, not just the Lower Brule and
Cheyenne River Sioux.

The controversial land varies in width on the shoreline along both sides of
the river. The transfer is to compensate the state and tribes for more than
400,000 acres of flooded wildlife habitat when the dams were built.

The state wants to plant trees and fix deteriorating boat ramps,
campgrounds and other recreational facilities along the river.

The new law also creates a trust fund to give the state and tribes money to
manage the land.

http://wolfseeker.com
http://www.sunlink.net/~

*****************

Thu., October 6  1999
Snoqualmie Tribe granted federal status for second time
http://flash.oregonlive.com/cgi-bin/or_nview.pl?/home1/wire/AP/Stream-Parsed/OREGON_NEWS/o1103_AM_WA--SnoqualmieTribe

SEATTLE (AP) -- The struggling Snoqualmie Tribe received  word Wednesday of a federal decision in its favor:
The  Interior Department rejected an appeal and declared the  tribe has been granted federal status.
"It's long overdue, and I think our ancestors are  rejoicing with us," said Arlene Ventura, a member of
the  1,000-member tribe based in Fall City. The Snoqualmies  have been battling for recognition for decades.

*****************

Attention all natives in Buffalo or Six nations area!
Date: Wed, 6 Oct 1999 19:15:16 EDT


The Native American People's Alliance of the University at Buffalo will
be holding a Columbus Day sit-in/rally in front of our Student Union at 3pm.
We want a lot of natives to be there so our rally can get media attention.
We will be wearing traditional dress for this occasion. If anyone needs
directions or information please Email Jessica at
QanQan@aol.com.


================================================================
RCMP ignore attacks, damage done by fishermen

THE TORONTO STAR

October 5, 1999

`We're not going to take this sitting down. It's going to be personal
now and it's going to get worse before it gets better.'
- Clarence Dedam Jr., brother of one of the Micmacs  injured Sunday

FULL STORY on the Canadian Native Page...Click Here

**********************

Feds threaten to close native fishery

THE NATIONAL POST
Tuesday, October 05, 1999

Dhaliwal threatens to close fishery

'There will be a regulated fishery or no fishery at all,' minister warns

Graeme Hamilton in Burnt Church, N.B., and Sheldon Alberts in Ottawa
National Post

BURNT CHURCH, N.B. AND OTTAWA - A day after New Brunswick
fishermen sparked violence by destroying thousands of Mi'kmaq lobster
traps, Herb Dhaliwal, the federal Fisheries Minister, said the government
could close the native fishery if chiefs don't agree to conservation
regulations.
FULL STORY ...Click HERE

*******************

The Ottawa Citizen Online:
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/national/991005/2953067.html

Native Fishermen Want RCMP Protection:
Two Sides Seek to Ease Tensions

Rick Mofina
The Ottawa Citizen

BURNT CHURCH, N.B. --
Native warriors in combat fatigues patrolled the local
wharf in shifts yesterday as the drama over the backlash to
a Supreme Court ruling upholding ancient aboriginal
fishing rights continued to heighten.

Full Story ...Click Here to the Canadian Native Page

**********************

To all of those planning on coming to DC for Peltier
Freedom Month, there is a listing of lodging in DC:

CLICK HERE

******************

McCAIN Letters

A lot of e-mails have come into SOL from people who want to get a letter
to Mccain. Here is his address:
Senator John McCain 
241 Russell Senate Office Building                        
Washington, D.C. 20510

He is best contacted by mail, as his office insists that they respond to
regular mail.

Keep in mind he is inextricably linked to the accommodation agreement and
that the simple facts are the most damaging:

relocation
relocation to sanders (uranium spill)
bennett freeze
religious intolerance (ie: this years sundance)
livestock impoundment and abuse
denial of basic American principals

Also, with his campaign gearing up, now is the time to put energy into his
direction. He just may turn out to be the one with a conscience. Remember
he was grilled at two booksignings in a few days span, a whole country
apart.

Mauro
SOL

*************************

Mi'kmaq & Maliseet attacked need help urgently
Date: Wed, 06 Oct 1999 00:28:59 -0400
URGENT:  MI'KMAQ AND MALISEET INDIAN NATIONS NEED HELP

CANADIAN SUPREME COURT RULES IN FAVOR OF INDIGENOUS FISHING RIGHTS
Re:  Donald Marshall Ruling

SACRED SITE BURNED BY NON-NATIVE MOB

MNN Mohawk Nation News.  Kahnawake of Mohawk
Territory.  5 Oct. 99. 
One week ago the Supreme Court of Canada affirmed that
according to a 1760 treaty Indigenous People have a right to fish without
restriction any time of the year.  Donald Marshall, a Mi'kmaq, was
arrested for catching eel out of season.  He took it to the Supreme Court
and won.  Since this favorable ruling for the Indians hundreds of
non-native fishermen have broken over 3,500 traps belonging to the Mi'kmaq
fishermen from Burnt Church, a native territory in New Brusnwick on the
Miramichi River.
They vandalized three plants suspected of processing native-caught
lobster.   Today they burnt a native sacred site.  So far the police
have  laid no charges nor stopped these mobs from attacking
the Indians and destroying and sabotaging Indian property.

URGENT.  The Mi'kmaq and Maliseet People need your help.
At an all chiefs conference yesterday the chiefs vowed to
continue to exercise their rights and support the Warrior Society.  They
need help physically, politically and financially.  The government is
presently standing back allowing the police to watch as non-natives
attack Indian people and damage their property.  The question is why
is the government allowing the non-native civilians to attack and
destroy without impunity.  In the past if the tables were turned, you
can be sure native people would have been arrested and given long prison
sentences.
Instead the mobs are allowed to rule, to desecrate Indian
property, to burn native boats, to destroy lobster traps and to
beat up native people.  The Mi'kmaq and Maliseet Nations are asking
supporters to contact the people listed below immediately and help
them, to go to Canadian Embassies all over the world and question
these tactics of using civilians against the native.  So this is the
new tactic of the government of not sending in the army?  People are
being ask to go to international organizations to put pressure on Canada
and to get whatever political support they can for the Mi'kmaq
and Maliseet Nations.  Remember, the native people have every right
to fish.  Because they do so they are be threatened.  As well, they need
more traps, fishing boats, fuel for their boats, communications
equipment and other necessary supplies.  They especially need people to go
there to deter the potential for violence.

To verify this information contact:  Frank Thomas
902-448-1605; Clifford
Larry 506-776-1013; Captain 506-523-9289; Steve
Marshall
902-890-1436.
Fax 902-897-2453

Supported by:
Mohawk Nation News
mohawkns@cyberglobe.net
450-632-6926
Canadian Alliance in Solidarity with the Native Peoples

*********************

 

October 5, 1999
Land Give Back
KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. (AP) - A potential water war over endangered fish
might be avoided under an ambitious plan that includes returning much of
the Winema National Forest to the Klamath Indian tribe.

 At issue is the endangered Lost River and shortnose sucker
fish in Klamath Lake. The tribe has been at odds with ranchers and
farmers who depend on the lake's water to irrigate pastures and crops.

 Settlement talks started in earnest last month after the Tulelake Growers
Association forwarded a draft proposal to the Hatfield
Upper Klamath Basin Working Group. The 31-member group includes
representatives from state and federal agencies; timber and agricultural interests;
conservation, hunting and fishing groups; and the tribe.

 Last Friday, more than 50 people crowded into a meeting
room at the Winema National Forest headquarters to have their say on the
growers' proposed settlement and the idea of restoring the tribe's
homeland.

 ``We believe that the pieces to construct a comprehensive
solution are in place, and miraculously the pieces could benefit
practically every interest,'' said Marshall Staunton, a farmer and
member of the Tulelake Growers, which drafted the plan.

 Opponents pointed to the $220 million paid to tribal members in exchange
for their reservation, and others voiced concern about lost
tax revenue in Chiloquin, where the 2,800-member tribe is based.

 ``What we have paid for is ours,'' said Don Roeder of Klamath Falls, whose
family owns ranch land in Fort Klamath, near the former
reservation. ``The United States government has no right to give away
public land.''

 The plan would give back the 680,000-acre reservation that
became part of the Winema National Forest in 1961.

 Other possibilities include re-engineering the Bureau of
Reclamation's massive Klamath Project, stepping up conversion of
farmland into marshes, guaranteeing adequate water for the basin's six
National Wildlife Refuges, protecting commercial farming on 22,000 acres leased
from one refuge and managing irrigation cutoffs in drought years.

 The tribe's 45-year quest to regain its reservation has
gained support from key members of the agricultural community,
surprising many area residents.

 Faith Wilkins of Chiloquin said the proposal ``has fragmented our
community at a very deep level on both sides.''

 The support follows two years of secret negotiations with
irrigators that began after the tribe successfully sued to ensure
adequate water for endangered fish in Klamath Lake and to recognize
tribal water rights within the Klamath Basin.

 Supporters praised the tribe's efforts to resolve water
issues outside of courtrooms and condemned the 1954 federal taking of
the timber-rich reservation.

 The tribe has ``done an excellent job to bring the parties
to the table and sit down to talk about some very delicate
issues,'' said irrigator Mike McKoen of Merrill.

 ``I think they have a legitimate claim there, and I think
it would benefit the economy of the entire region,'' added Earl Miller
of Bonanza.

 Tribal members said restoration of their homeland would
help sustain both the environment and the economy.

 ``It will allow the people who know the land best and live
here to make the decisions,'' tribal Chairman Allen Foreman said.

 Returning the Winema forest to the tribe and re-engineering the Klamath
Project's irrigation system would require congressional
approval and federal financing, worrying some.

 ``There is an inherent danger in asking Congress to pass any
legislation,'' said James Ottoman of Malin.

 But many still see the real danger as the loss of a water
supply developed mostly for agriculture.

 ``We're not interested in giving it away,'' said Barney Hoyt of Malin.

*****************

Rethinking Tourism Project
October 5, 1999

Hello, I'm writing on behalf of the Rethinking Tourism Project,
an Indigenous Peoples non-governmental organization dedicated
to protecting and preserving indigenous land and culture.  We
are located in Minnesota.  For more information about RTP,
please check out our website (see address at bottom).
One of our brothers, Octavio Ruiz, recently attended the World
Tourism Organization session in Santiago, Chile. He will be
reporting on this meeting in an upcoming RTP E-Newsletter, and
we will also put his report on this CSD listserve if everyone is
interested. Octavio was treated unfairly by the WTO and we
have a lot further to go with this institution. He also has a report
on the Global Code of Ethics.
We want  to thank the NGOs for organizing this listserve as
a way to support each other and discuss critical issues, planning,
etc. together. We welcome personal emails as well when people
want to ask us a specific question or make a comment, in order
to not send messages to everyone on the listserve.
We ask that everyone who writes an email to please sign your
name to all emails submitted so we will know who it is from. 
Also, some emails can be sent privately not to everyone on the list.
Please make sure your email is important to everyone or just send
it privately.  Thank you Beatrize, for undertaking this important work.
Thanks,
Deborah McLaren, Director (Shawnee)
Rethinking Tourism Project
Protecting & Preserving Indigenous Lands and Cultures
PO Box 581938
Minneapolis, MN 55458-1938 USA
Saint Paul, MN Office Phone/Fax: 651-644-9984
Email: RTProject@aol.com
Website: http://www2.planeta.com/mader/ecotravel/resources/rtp/rtp.html


************

November 1999 Leonard Peltier Freedom Month in
Washington DC--Calendar

Click Here for Full Details

*******************

Sun, 3 Oct 1999 15:09:40 EDT
High Court To Decide Hawaii Rights
.c The Associated Press
   By BRUCE DUNFORD

HONOLULU (AP) - Harold ``Freddy'' Rice sees his family as a microcosm of
the islands' racially mixed population: Diverse, but not always equal.

Born and raised on the islands, Rice is a white rancher whose
great-grandfather was governor of Kauai under the last island queen, Lili`uokalani. In
Hawaii's melting pot, two of his grandchildren are considered Hawaiian - and therefore
eligible for special st ate and federal benefits. Three are not.

``What do I tell my grandchildren, that some of them are different? Some
are privileged, some need assistance, some can't go to (Hawaiians-only)
Kamehameha Schools?'' Rice said. ``When you see it in your own family it becomes real obvious.''

For the last three years, Rice has been challenging a state law giving Hawaiians special
race-based voting privileges.

On Wednesday, the 62-year-old rancher will break from tending cattle on his Big Island spread
to listen to arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court.

Across the country, the arguments have drawn the attention of those on either side of the
debate involving minority groups and affirmative action.

``The potential implications could be great for all native peoples in the United States,'' said
Jon Van Dyke, a University of Hawaii constitutional law professor.
``There's not much logic in differentiating Native Americans from native Hawaiians. So
if Hawaii ans can't be given special rights, it would be hard to justify them for other Native
Americans.''

Briefs in support of the state have been filed by the National Congress of American Indians,
the Alaska Native Federation, the Justice Department, and Alabama, California, Nevada, New
Mexico, Oklahoma and Oregon.

Supporting Rice were Robert Bork, the conservative commentator and former Supreme Court
nominee, and The Campaign for a Color-Blind America, a Texas-based organization that has backed
legal challenges of voting districts drawn on racial lines.

At issue are elections held by the quasi-state Office of Hawaiian Affairs, established in 1978
to run a $300 million trust that benefits the islands' estimated 200,000 residents of Hawaiian
blood. The office oversees a wide variety of economic, social, health  and education programs.

State law says only residents who descend from those islanders living here prior to 1778, when
British Capt. James Cook made the first Western contact, can serve on the office's board of
nine trustees, or vote in OHA elections.

About 20 percent of the state's population have some Hawaiian blood, according to the OHA.

After being denied a ballot to vote for the board, Rice sued Gov. Ben Cayetano, claiming the
elections violate the 14th Amendment's guarantees of equal protection and the 15th Amendment's
guarantees against racial discrimination.

U.S. District Judge David Ezra disagreed, saying Hawaiians enjoy a special trust relationship
with the federal government that justifies the voting requirements. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court
of Appeals concurred, saying the voting restriction ``is not primarily  racial, but legal and political.''

Unlike American Indians, native Hawaiians are not a recognized tribe.

``The Supreme Court has provided Hawaiians with an opportunity to stand tall before this nation
and demand our rights as the indigenous people of these islands,'' said OHA trustee chairwoman
Rowena Akana.

To The Campaign for a Color-Blind America, an affirmation of the lower courts' rulings could
lead to race-based elections in many other states.

``This case could lead to a deprivation of voting rights of large populations in a number of
states if the declaration of a special relationship with a minority population is enough to
justify racial discrimination in voting,'' said the group's Shannen Coffin
.

The Clinton administration, which apologized to Hawaiians in 1993 for U.S. involvement in the
illegal 1893 overthrow of Queen Lili`uokalani, is backing the state.

AP-NY-10-03-99 1509EDT

   Copyright 1999 The Associated Press.  The information  contained in the AP news report may
not be published,  broadcast, rewritten or otherwise distributed without  prior written authority of The Associated Press.

Reprinted under the Fair Use
http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html doctrine of international copyright law.
             &&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

******************

Sun, 3 Oct 1999 18:16:00 EDT
Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

The fifth intersessional working group on the Draft Declaration on the Rights
of Indigenous Peoples will meet in Geneva from October 18-29.  This is the
fifth year in a row that the United States and other nations have dragged out
the process of recognizing the international customary law rights of
indigenous peoples.  Those who follow developments in this forum may wish to
consider direct action:

On March 1, 1999, the United Nations General Assembly adopted Resolution No.
53/134, the "Universal realization of the right of peoples to
self-determination."  Resolution No. 1 of that document "Reaffirms that the
universal realization of the right of all peoples, including those under
colonial, foreign and alien domination, to self-determination is a
fundamental condition for the effective guarantee and observance of human
rights and for the preservation and promotion of such rights."  There is no
doubt that the indigenous peoples of the world are under colonial and alien
domination.  Why, then, is the U.S. State Department attempting to deny the
right to effective self-determination in the draft Declaration and in a
similar Organization of American States declaration? 

On March 8, 1999, the U.N. General Assembly adopted Resolution No. 53/144,
the "Declaration of the Right and Responsibility of Individuals, Groups and
Organs of Society to Promote and Protect Universally Recognized Human Rights
and Fundamental Freedoms."  Article 9 guarantees the important rights to have
human rights protected, the means to complain of violations of human rights,
and to have an effective remedy.

Thus far, the U.S. State Department refuses to tell indigenous
representatives who is calling the shots and who is making the decisions on
the U.S. position on the Declaration.  They refuse to respond to complaints
about the U.S. positions or to acknowledge Indian nation positions on the
Declaration.  Those are obvious violations of this last Declaration (which is
a statement of international customary law). 

The State Department will continue to stonewall and voice its ignorant
positions on the Declaration unless public attention is focused upon the
Department's actions.  According to the State Department web page
(www.state.gov), anyone can e-mail Secretary Albright at secretary@state.gov,
and "The Bureau of Public Affairs reviews all emails sent to this address
and  responds on behalf of the Secretary."  Everyone who follows this bulletin
board is encouraged to e-mail Secretary Abright to demand that she:

1.  Support the draft Declaration, as originally presented, THIS YEAR.

2.  Disclose to the American public the names and identities of those who are
setting U.S. policy on the Declaration.

3.  Stop holding flashy "consultations" with indigenous leaders in Washington
and then telling the U.N. that they have been "consulted," without reporting
what they actually say about the State Department's positions.

4.  Stop the stonewalling on the Declaration and tell the truth - the United
States is not prepared to meet the international human rights of indigenous
peoples.

5.  Stop showing disrespect for the Miguel Alfonso Martinez treaty study -
it  is correct.

6.  Acknowledge Indian treaties for the international instruments they are,
and admit the fact that they were made with Indian nations as states.

7.  Remove Michael Dennis of the Office of Legal Affairs from any project
having to do with indigenous peoples.

We also encourage readers to use the Netwarriors site when the intersessional
working group begins its work on October 18th to voice strong support of the
indigenous representatives in Geneva.  They sit on the edge of a circular
room with national representatives in the middle, calling the shots.  The
voices of indigenous leaders are muffled because they are not allowed to
speak out to tell the truth - that the major nations of the world are guilty
of wholesale violations of the rights of indigenous peoples and that the
United States is in fact attempting to defeat or water down the Declaration
so indigenous peoples will have no internationally-protected human rights.  
The Department is in deep denial on the last point, and it needs to be set
straight. 

Indigenous peoples are doing poorly in Geneva because their situation has not
made the radar screens of the media, and there is little popular pressure on
national governments to call for support of the Declaration;  particularly in
the United States.

James W. Zion
Navajo Working Group for Human Rights
Reprinted under the Fair Use
http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html doctrine of international
copyright law.
             &&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&
            Tsonkwadiyonrat (We are ONE Spirit)
                       Unenh onhwa' Awayaton
                    http://www.tdi.net/ishgooda/       
             UPDATES: CAMP JUSTICE
http://shell.webbernet.net/~ishgooda/oglala/
             &&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

*****************

April 1999 Reminder from Fred Buma:
Happy Birthday Mumia Abu Jamal.
Letter from commandante Marcos to Mumia Abu Jamal.
Click Here for FULL heart felt letter...

*******************

Help stop the buffalo slaughter 
 
  Date: Fri, 1 Oct 1999 12:36:01 -0500
  From: "J.D.K. Chipps" jdkc@WOPTURA.COM
 
  I would like to remind everyone that there is an extremely
  easy way to write letters of protest against the slaughter
  of our buffalo.
  Just go to:
  http://woptura.com/rescue.html
 
  and scroll down to the link that says:
  "Write today to protest the slaughter of our Buffalo"
 
  It's already addressed, so you don't have to look up or type
  out addresses, just fill in your comments on the slaughter
  and click "Send".
  It's easy, it's simple, and it may save a life.
  Please write today, and often, and remember the guilty party
  is Racicot.  He alone bears the responsibility for this
  slaughter, the DOL just work for him.
 
  Pilamaya yelo

*******************

October 01, 1999 7:06 AM

SEA SHEP DIMWITS IN COURT
SEDNA: Protestor arraignments tomorrow...


From: "Michael Two Horses" twohorse@u.arizona.edu
Hello all,

I wanted to let you know that the Sea Shepherd and SEDNA folks are going to
be arraigned in Federal Court tomorrow in Tacoma (if you didn't already
know...).

Federal arraignment 1:30pm Friday October 1, 1999

Josh Harper
Jake Conroy
Alison Lance
Lisa DiStephano
Scott Hopper

Violation of 46 USC § 2302:

46 USCS § 2302 *** THIS SECTION IS CURRENT THROUGH 106-55,
APPROVED 8/17/99
***

TITLE 46. SHIPPING
SUBTITLE II. VESSELS AND SEAMEN
PART A. GENERAL PROVISIONS
CHAPTER 23. OPERATION OF VESSELS GENERALLY

46 USCS § 2302 (1999)

§ 2302.  Penalties for negligent operations and interfering with safe
operation

(a) A person operating a vessel in a negligent manner or interfering with
the safe operation of a vessel, so as to endanger the life, limb, or
property of a person is liable to the United States Government for a civil
penalty of not more than $ 1,000.

(b) A person operating a vessel in a grossly negligent manner that endangers
the life, limb, or property of a person commits a class A misdemeanor.

(c) An individual who is under the influence of alcohol, or a dangerous drug
in violation of a law of the United States when operating a vessel, as
determined under standards prescribed by the Secretary by regulation--
    (1) is liable to the United States Government for a civil penalty of not
more than $ 5,000; or
    (2) commits a class A misdemeanor.

(d) For a penalty imposed under this section, the vessel also is liable in
rem unless the vessel is--
    (1) owned by a State or a political subdivision of a State;
    (2) operated principally for governmental purposes; and
    (3) identified clearly as a vessel of that State or subdivision.

(e) (1) A vessel may not transport Government-impelled cargoes if--
       (A) the vessel has been detained and determined to be substandard by
the Secretary for violation of an international safety convention to which
the United States is a party, and the Secretary has published notice of that
detention and determination in an electronic form, including the name of the
owner of the vessel; or
       (B) the operator of the vessel has on more than one occasion had a
vessel detained and determined to be substandard by the Secretary for
violation of an international safety convention to which the United States
is a party, and the Secretary has published notice of that detention and
determination in an electronic form, including the name of the owner of the
vessel.
    (2) The prohibition in paragraph (1) expires for a vessel on the earlier
of--
       (A) 1 year after the date of the publication in electronic form on
which the prohibition is based; or
       (B) any date on which the owner or operator of the vessel prevails in
an appeal of the violation of the relevant international convention on
which
the detention is based.
    (3) As used in this subsection, the term "Government-impelled cargo"
means cargo for which a Federal agency contracts directly for shipping by
water or for which (or the freight of which) a Federal agency provides
financing, including financing by grant, loan, or loan guarantee, resulting
in shipment of the cargo by water.

HISTORY:
    (Aug. 26, 1983, P.L. 98-89, § 1, 97 Stat. 508; Oct. 30, 1984, P.L.
98-557, § 7(a), 98 Stat. 2862.)
    (As amended Aug. 18, 1990, P.L. 101-380, Title IV, Subtitle A, §
4105(b)(2), Subtitle C, § 4302(a), 104 Stat. 513, 537; Nov. 4, 1992, P.L.
102-587, Title V, Subtitle A, § 5102, 106 Stat. 5071; Nov. 13, 1998, P.L.
105-383, Title III, §§ 302(a), 304(c), Title IV, § 408(a), 112 Stat. 3417,
3419, 3430.)

HISTORY; ANCILLARY LAWS AND DIRECTIVES

Prior law and revision:

- --------------------------------------------------------------------
Revised Section                                    Source (USCS)
- --------------------------------------------------------------------
2302 .........................................     46:1461(d)
                                                   46:1483
                                                   46:1484(b)
- --------------------------------------------------------------------

    Section 2302 states that the negligent operation of a vessel is
prohibited. These acts are subject to civil and criminal penalties and the
involved vessel is subject to an in rem action. The negligent operation
provisions have their genesis in the Act of April 25, 1940, 54 Stat. 167,
when Congress prescribed that no person shall operate any motorboat or any
vessel in a reckless or negligent manner. This provision was directed at all
vessels and not those solely engaged in recreational boating. When the
Federal Boat Safety Act of 1971, P.L. 92-75, 85 Stat. 217 (46 U.S.C. 1461)
was enacted it adopted the reckless or negligent operation provisions of
the1940 Act. It adopted for the first time a provision for assessing civil
penalties in addition to criminal penalties. It dropped the word "reckless"
because of redundancy. It also combined the two classes of vessels; "any
motorboat or any vessel" into one class by using the word "vessel" and
defined vessel as including every description of watercraft.

Amendments:
    1984. Act Oct. 30, 1984, redesignated former subsec. (c) as subsec.
(d);
and added a new subsec. (c).
    1990. Act Aug. 18, 1990 (applicable as provided by § 1020 of such
Act,
which appears as 33 USCS § 2701 note) in subsec. (b), substituted "commits a
class A misdemeanor." for "shall be fined not more than $ 5,000, imprisoned
for not more than one year, or both."; in subsec. (c), in the introductory
matter, substituted "under the influence of alcohol, or a dangerous drug in
violation of a law of the United States" for "intoxicated", and deleted ",
shall be" following "regulation", in para. (1), inserted "is" preceding
"liable", and substituted para. (2) for one which read: "fined not more than
$ 5,000, imprisoned for not more than one year, or both.".
    1992. Act Nov. 4, 1992, in subsec. (c)(1), substituted "$ 1,000 for a
first violation and not more than $ 5,000 for a subsequent violation;" for"$ 1,000;".
    1998. Act Nov. 13, 1998, substituted the section heading for one which
read: "§ 2302. Penalties for negligent operations"; in subsec. (a),
substituted "or interfering with the safe operation of a vessel, so as to
endanger" for "that endangers"; and, in subsec. (c)(1), substituted "$
5,000; or" for "$ 1,000 for a first violation and not more than $ 5,000 for
a subsequent violation; or".
    Such Act further (effective 1/1/99, as provided by § 408(b) of such Act,
which appears as a note to this section), added subsec. (e).

Other provisions:
    Effective date of amendment made by § 408(a) of Act Nov. 13, 1998.
Act
Nov. 13, 1998, P.L. 105-383, Title IV, § 408(b), 112 Stat. 3431, provides:
"The amendment made by subsection (a) [adding subsec. (e) of this section]
takes effect January 1, 1999.".

NOTES:

                           CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS
Add:
    33 CFR Part 95

                                CROSS REFERENCES
    Penalty procedures, 46 USCS § 2107.
    Refund of penalties, 46 USCS § 2108.
    Injunctions against negligent operation, 46 USCS § 2305.

                                 RESEARCH GUIDE
Federal Procedure:
    Navigable Waters, Fed Proc, L Ed, § 57:223.

Am Jur:
    12 Am Jur 2d, Boats and Boating § 41.
    70 Am Jur 2d, Shipping § 615.

Am Jur Trials:
    Litigation involving accidents, 7 Am Jur Trials 1.
    Preparation of case concerning collision, 17 Am Jur Trials 501.
    Role of ship inspection in collision cases, 17 Am Jur Trials 501.
    Effect of licensing and certification in ship collision cases, 17 Am Jur
Trials 501.

Am Jur Proof of Facts:
    Negligent operation of ski boat, 36 Am Jur Proof of Facts 2d pp 525-604.
    Motorboat accidents, 14 Am Jur Proof of Facts pp 399-530.
    Marine radar accidents, 17 Am Jur Proof of Facts pp 283-505.
    Emergency stopping and turning of ships, 20 Am Jur Proof of Facts
pp 1-222.

Annotations:
    Liability of owner for vessel negligently sunk in navigable waters. 19 L
Ed 2d 407.
    Half-distance rule relating to speed of vessels in fog. 34 L Ed 2d 365.
    Last clear chance doctrine in admiralty. 3 ALR Fed 203.
    Right to limitation of liability as to accident caused by defective
navigation equipment. 20 ALR Fed 830.
    Criminal liability for injury or death caused by operation of pleasure
boat. 8 ALR4th 886.
    Res ipsa loquitur with respect to personal injuries or death on or
about
ship. 1 ALR3d 642.
    Right to recover for death of seaman under Death on the High Seas Act as
affected by Jones Act. 22 ALR3d 852.
    Liability of owner of powerboat for injury or death allegedly caused by
one permitted to operate boat by owner. 71 ALR3d 1018.
    Liability of owner or operator of powered pleasure boat for injuries to
swimmer or bather struck by boat. 98 ALR3d 1127.
    Liability for failure as to rescue of seaman who has gone overboard.
91
ALR2d 1032.

Texts:
    1 Norris, The Law of Seamen (3d ed), §§ 531, 535.

Law Review Articles:
    Gold, Vessel Traffic Regulation: The Interface of Maritime Safety and
Operational Freedom. 14 J Maritime L 1-21, January, 1983.
    Taylor, Criminal Liabilities of Ships Masters. Lloyds Maritime & Com
L Q
499-505, November, 1981.

                         INTERPRETIVE NOTES AND DECISIONS
  1. What constitutes negligence
  2. Who is liable
  3. Defenses

1. What constitutes negligence
    Maximum penalty of $ 1,000 assessed by Coast Guard against pilot of
pleasure boat for negligent operation is proper under 46 USCS § 2302(a)
where (1) hearing officer apparently accepted version of event offered by
pilot of second boat--that first boat came close to second boat at high rate
of speed, thereby creating large wake which tossed second boat and caused
passenger to fall from chair and sustain incapacitating injury requiring
medical attention, (2) pilot of first boat admitted advancing throttle from
1200 RPM to 3200 RPM as he approached entrance to harbor, creating wake, and
arriving at slip 10 minutes before second boat, and (3) speed of second boat
was limited to 1400 RPM, notwithstanding that pilot of first boat claimed
second boat "roared up" behind first boat and crossed wake twice.
Green vUnited States Coast Guard (1986, ND Ill) 642 F Supp 638.
    Operation of vessel at night without navigational lights is sufficient to
find negligent use of vessel since failure to display lights presents
unreasonable risk to other vessels and to darkened vessel itself; actual
damage or injury is not element of this violation, although resulting
damages may affect gravity of particular violation. G-LMI ltr 16781/2, 2
June 80, CGLB, Feb 1980.
    Finding of negligent use of vessel in manner so as to endanger life, limb
or property, in violation of predecessor to 46 USCS § 2302 was proper
where record discloses that wheelhouse of vessel in question was left
unattended for 5-10 minutes before collision with another vessel while operator, who
had earlier observed other vessel on nearby parallel course, went below to
make coffee; actions of other vessel, whether contributory to collision or
not, are irrelevant to civil penalty for negligent use of subject vessel.
G-LMI ltr 16731/8, 20 Feb 80, CGLB, Aug 1980.
    Vessel is negligently used so as to endanger life, limb, or property
where there is failure to secure exit hatches in heavy weather which permits
water to enter closed but unsecured hatch and cause vessel to sink. G-LMI
ltr 16460/8, 18 June 80, CGLB, Feb 1981.
    Failure of vessel master to assure that cargo containers are stowed
securely before ship leaves loading dock for sea and failure of vessel
officers in charge of unloading tanker, having notice of severe leak at
cargo pump, to remedy leak or mitigate its effects, constitute "use of
vessel in negligent manner," within meaning of predecessor to 46 USCS
§
2302. G-LMI memo 16732, 12 Nov 80, CGLB, Mar 1982.

2. Who is liable
    Pilot, having without necessity adopted dangerous course and having
failed, must bear responsibility. The George H. Dentz (1882, DC NY) 12 F
575.
    Any fault for act of licensed pilot in anchoring vessel in space allotted
to loaded instead of light vessels by harbor regulations was not
attributable to vessel. The Severn (1902, DC Va) 113 F 578.
    Offending vessel is liable for negligent act of pilot employed under
compulsion, and pilot is liable to vessel employing him and one injured
because of negligent act. Donald v Guy (1903, DC Va) 127 F 228.
    Bark anchored in harbor in violation of reasonable harbor regulation,
by tug acting as local pilot, is responsible for act and liable for resulting
collision. The Admiral Cecille (1905, DC Wash) 134 F 673.

3. Defenses
    In action for damages from collision due to vessel breaking from her
moorings, it is no defense that vessel was moored by licensed pilot, there
being no law or regulation compelling master to submit to directions of
pilot as to fastenings. Camden & A.R. Transp. Co. v The Lotty (1846, DC NY)
F Cas No 2337a.
    Before owner can defeat in personam liability, he must show not merely
applicability of compulsory pilotage provisions, but that collision was not
due to fault of vessel or crew; vessel's unseaworthy condition because of
defective radio transmitter precludes availability of pilotage defense to in
personam liability. Hogge v SS Yorkmar (1977, DC Md) 434 F Supp 715.

End of USCS entry.

They'll be at:

Tacoma Federal Courthouse
1717 Pacific Ave
Tacoma, WA 98402
(253) 593-6313
9:00 am to 4:30 pm
Take I-5 to Exit 133, City Center, follow the signs to City Center - this
puts you on Fwy 705 - take 21st St exit - turn right on Pacific Ave.
Parking:
$5.00/day, $3.00/half-day. VERY LIMITED one hour free parking on the
street.

Please post this wherever possible...the protestors will be out in force.
I'd like to see as many Indians as possible at this arraignment, not for a
confrontation but to show that we're determined that these people stay
within the law in their activities against the Makahs, since they seem to
believe that their end justifies their means.

Talk to you later,
mth


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Front Page or Contents
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Native News and Issues (October 1999)
Native News and Issues (November 1999)
Native Historicals, Page 1 (All Previous Dates)
Native Historicals, Page 2 (Sept. 1999)