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Patrick as 'Prospero' Theatre
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Beginnings
  Patrick began acting at the age of 12, and for the next 4 or 5 years he played with a number of amateur dramatic companies in and around his home town of Mirfield in Yorkshire.

After graduating from the respected Bristol Old Vic theatre school, Patrick's professional stage career, which now spans nearly 40 years, began in 1959 with the role of Morgan in "Treasure Island" at Lincoln Theatre Royal.

Following this was continual work with a number of British repertory companies across the UK, and on occasion joining companies such as Bristol Old Vic in their overseas tours with established stars such as Vivien Leigh.

For Patrick, going from role to role and theatre to theatre provided not only a wonderful experience, but the very best way to improve his performance and technique.

Roles with the RSC
  In 1966 Patrick joined the Royal Shakespeare Company at Stratford-upon-Avon, and within a year was made an Associate Artist. 

Coinciding with his arrival at Stratford was the significant appointment of Trevor Nunn, who took over as Artistic Director from Peter Hall. 

The RSC was about to undergo a transformation with a group of actors forming a new nucleus of talent including Susan Fleetwood, Alan Howard, Ben Kingsley, Helen Mirren, Norman Rodway, Stewart, and Janet Suzman. 

Throughout the late '60's and into the '70's this group under the direction of, Terry Hands, John Barton, David Jones, Peter Brook and later Buzz Goodbody would inspire some of the most noted productions the RSC had ever staged. 

Stewart was to find the work both immensely stimulating and rewarding as an actor, playing everything from Shakespeare to Chekov, Gorky, Stoppard and Edward Bond.  So much so, that he remained working solely for the RSC until 1982.


 
Play

 
Year

 
Role

 
Photos
Hamlet 1966 First Player  
The Revenger's Tragedy
1966/7
Hippolytus  
The Taming of the Shrew
1967
Hippolito/
Grumio
Taming of the Shrew - click to enlarge
As You Like It
1967/8
Touchstone/
Duke Senior
 
The Relapse 1968 Worthy  
King Lear
1968
Cornwall King Lear - click to enlarge
Troilus and Cressida 1968/9 Hector  
Much Ado About Nothing
1968/9
Borachio  
The Tempest
1970
Stephano Tempest - click to enlarge
The Two Gentlemen of Verona
1970
Launce  
A Midsummer Night's Dream
1971
Snout  
Occupations
1971
Kabak  
Enemies
1971
Mikhail Enemies - click to enlarge
Coriolanus  1972 Tullus Aufidius  
Julius Caesar
1972/3
Cassius Julius Caesar - click to enlarge
Antony and Cleopatra  1972/3 Enobarbus*
VHS Video available from Polygram - Renaissance Classics
 
Titus Andronicus
1973
Aaron  
Uncle Vanya
1974
Astrov  
Hedda Gabler
1975
Loveborg  
The Iceman Cometh
1976
Larry Slade  
Bingo
1976
Shakespeare  
A Midsummer Night's Dream
1977
Oberon A Midsummer Night's Dream - click to enlarge
That Good Between Us
1977
Knatchbull  
The Bundle
1977
Basho  
A Miserable and Lonely Death
1978
 Colonel Goosen  
The Merchant of Venice
1978
Shylock*
* Olivier Award nomination
Best Actor
Merchant of Venice - click to enlarge
Antony and Cleopatra
1979
Enobarbus*
* Best Supporting Actor-Olivier Awards
 
Hippolytus 1978/9 Thesesus  
The White Guard 1979 Myshlaevsky  
The Two Gentlemen of Verona 1981 Sir Eglamour  
Titus Andronicus 1981 Titus Andronicus  
The Winter's Tale
1981/2
Leontes The Winter's Tale - click to enlarge
Henry IV Parts One & Two
1982
Henry IV*
*Opened the new Barbican Arts Centre in London
Henry IV - click to enlarge
Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1986/87)
  Patrick made his debut in a leading American classic role as the embittered 'George' in Edward Albee's 'Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?' at the Young Vic in London in 1986. Stewart was chosen at the last minute for the role by Billie Whitelaw - who played Martha, and director David Thacker.

The production received great critical acclaim and Patrick was awarded Best Actor by the London Fringe Awards. Following this success it was hoped to transfer the production to London's West End but when Billie Whitelaw decided not to continue in the role of Martha, negotiations slowed and meanwhile Patrick was offered a role in an American television series that would change his life as he knew it.... 

The Tempest (1995)
The Tempest After the end of the 'Star Trek:The Next Generation' television series, Patrick was keen to return to his theatre roots and to Shakespeare. Now based in America, he began with the role of  Prospero in George C. Wolfe's 'The Tempest' as part of the New York Shakespeare Festival for 1995.

The play performed to massive crowds in Central Park, and was so popular that it transferred to Broadway for a limited sold out run.

Patrick received a nomination as Best Actor from the Outer Critics Circle for this role.

 
Reviews
Photos
  Time Magazine As Prospero
    Prospero & daughter
A Christmas Carol (1986 - 1996)
A Christmas Carol During his time with the TNG television series, Stewart conceived the idea of a one man performance of Charles Dickens classic "A Christmas Carol" as a way of keeping his beloved theatre work going during the limited time available.

Beginning in 1991 and continuing until 1996 at venues in California, on Broadway and also in London, the performances received critical acclaim and recognition from the Drama Desk and Olivier Awards. During the performance on a bare stage Stewart used minimal props to portray over 35 characters from the book!

After refusing for many years to film the performance, a deal was agreed with Robert Halmi of Hallmark Entertainment for a TV film version to be adapted for the screen by British playwright Peter Barnes.

Visit the TV page for details of this 1999 TNT production.

If you want to experience this remarkable performance a recording is available on cassette and CD from Simon & Shuster Audioworks (ISBN 0 671 69761 7)

Highly recommended.

 
Site
Photos
  CD/cassette details In performance
 
Audio
Video Clip
  Talking about Dickens In performance
Othello (1997)
Othello The role Stewart had always wanted to play since he first read it at age 14 was that of the tragic Moor Othello.

By the time he was of an age and experience to play the role, it was no longer acceptable for a white actor to put on black face an pretend to be an African Moor.

To get round this Stewart conceived the idea of simply reversing the roles, making Othello white and the rest of the cast black. It took some time before he finally found a theatre willing to take the risk of mounting such a production, and it was to the Shakespeare Theater in Washington D.C. that thanks must go for the opportunity.

The production ran from November 11th 1997 to January 4th 1998 and generated unprecedented advanced bookings ensuring that the run was sold out months before it's opening.

Those lucky enough to see the production saw Stewart's incredible stage 'presence', in what was an outstanding performance.

 
Reviews
Photos
  Review of Production Othello & Desdemona
  Washington Post Othello & Desdemona
  Curtain Up DC Review Othello & Desdemona
    Othello & Iago
    Othello
 
Sound Clip
 
  Talking about Othello  
The Ride Down Mt. Morgan (1998 and 2000)
The Ride Down Mt. Morgan In November 1998 Patrick starred in the New York premiere of Arthur Miller's 1991 play 'The Ride Down Mt. Morgan' at the Public Theater off Broadway.

This late Miller play deals with the power of sensuality and centres around Stewart's character of Lyman Felt, a wealthy New York insurance man who crashes his car one icy evening on the way down Mount Morgan and is confined to a hospital bed.

Whilst there he is visited by his lawyer and hears that his wife is also there to visit, the problem is which one....unbeknown to anyone Lyman has married twice! In his mind Lyman sees the confrontation as his wife of some 20 years Theo and daughter Bessie meet his more recent younger wife Leah.

This event does indeed happen and Lyman has to deal with the consequences of what he has done in an effort to 'have it all'.

Stewart gives an excellent portrayal of the sensuous Lyman, a man whose appetite for life and it's pleasures out weighs his moral conscience.

Patrick reprised the role of Lyman Felt on Broadway, this time at the Ambassador Theater from March 21st to July 23rd 2000

 
Reviews
Photos
  New York Times Lyman, Theo & daughter
  New York Post Lyman, Theo & Leah
  ABC News.com Lyman
Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (2001)
George and Martha 15 years previously Stewart had desperately wanted to continue the successful production of 'Woolf' in London where he first came to the role of the battered academic 'George' in Edward Albee's vitriolic play. Then Star Trek 'happened'. Once the series ended he again looked to reprise the role, but things didn't work out. 

So having written off the idea of ever playing George again it was a happy coincidence that director David Esbjornson (who directed Stewart in Ride Down Mt. Morgan) mentioned this would be his next project!

Albee's play revolves around 'George' and 'Martha', two intellectuals who have spent a lifetime playing games in a world of false values. Arriving home one evening after a party, they invite a young couple 'Nick' and 'Honey' to join them, and slowly as the drink flows so the vicious sparring of words between 'Martha' and 'George' begins, ultimately leading to a shocking conclusion. 

 
Reviews
Reviews
  Minneapolis Star Tribune Citypages.com
  NYTheatre.com Chicago Tribune
  Variety.com Twincities.com
  KMSP.tv  
 
Audio & Video
Related Articles
  Minnesota Public Radio interview with Stewart Minneapolis Star Tribune item
  MPR's Mid Morning Show Stewart explains it all for us
  MPR slideshow of rehearsals Article about the revival
    Associated Press article at CNN
    Playbill article
    Transfer to Broadway?
Future Stage Roles
  In recent years Patrick has appeared in modern American classics by Miller and Albee, and yet several major Shakespearean roles have still eluded him - notably Lear, Macbeth, Antony and Falstaff.

His next stage role will be in another 20th century work,  this time back in England (for the first time in 15 years) in the Autumn of 2001 for J.B. Priestley's 'Johnson Over Jordan' at the West Yorkshire Playhouse in Leeds.

However, having decided to concentrate on stage work in the next few years, we can be assured that Shakespeare will remain a high priority in the theatre roles he chooses. 

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