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Edward Lear
1812- 1888


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The Owl and the Pussy-Cat
HOW pleasant to know Mr. Lear
The Daddy Long-Legs and the Fly
There was an Old Man of Nepaul

The Owl and the Pussy-Cat

THE Owl and the Pussy-Cat went to sea
In a beautiful pea-green boat,
They took some honey, and plenty of money,
Wrapped up in a five pound-note.
The Owl looked up to the stars above,
And sang to a small guitar,
'O lovely Pussy! O Pussy, my love,
What a beautiful Pussy you are,
You are,
You are!
What a beautiful Pussy you are.'
Pussy said to the Owl, 'You elegant fowl,
How charmingly sweet you sing.
O let us be married, too long have we tarried,
But what shall we do for a ring?'
They sailed away for a year and a day,
To the land where the Bong-tree grows,
And there in the wood a Piggy-wig stood,
With a ring in the end of his nose,
His nose,
His nose!
With a ring in the end of his nose.
'Dear Pig, are you willing, to sell for one shilling
Your ring?' Said the Piggy, 'I will.'
So they took it away, and were married next day,
By the Turkey who lives on the hill.
They dined on mince, and slices of quince,
Which they ate with a runcible spoon;
And hand in hand, on the edge of the sand,
They danced by the light of the moon,
The moon,
The moon!
They danced by the light of the moon.

HOW pleasant to know Mr. Lear,
Who has written such volumes of stuff.
Some think him ill-tempered and queer,
But a few find him pleasant enough.
 
His mind is concrete and fastidious,
His nose is remarkably big;
His visage is more or less hideous,
His beard it resembles a wig.
 
He has ears, and two eyes, and ten fingers,
(Leastways if you reckon two thumbs);
He used to be one of the singers,
But now he is one of the dumbs.
 
He sits in a beautiful parlour,
With hundreds of books on the wall;
He drinks a great deal of marsala,
But never gets tipsy at all.
 
He has many friends, laymen and clerical,
Old Foss is the name of his cat;
His body is perfectly spherical,
He weareth a runcible hat.
 
When he walks in waterproof white,
The children run after him so!
Calling out, "He's gone out in his night-
Gown, that crazy old Englishman, oh!"
 
He weeps by the side of the ocean,
He weeps on the top of the hill;
He purchases pancakes and lotion,
And chocolate shrimps from the mill.
 
He reads, but he does not speak, Spanish,
He cannot abide ginger beer;
Ere the days of his pilgrimage vanish,
How pleasant to know Mr. Lear!

The Daddy Long-Legs and the Fly
1
Once Mr. Daddy Long-Legs,
Dressed in brown and gray,
Walked about upon the sands
Upon a summers day;
And there among the pebbles,
When the wind was rather cold,
He met with Mr. Floppy Fly,
All dressed in blue and gold.
And as it was too soon to dine,
They drank some Periwinkle-wine,
And played an hour two, or more,
At battlecock and shuttledore.
2
Said Mr. Daddy Long-Legs
To Mr. Floppy Fly,
Why do you never come to court?
I wish youd tell me why.
All gold and shine, in dress so fine,
Youd quite delight the court.
Why do you never go at all?
I really think you ought!
And if you went, youd see such sights!
Such rugs! Such jugs! And candle-lights!
And more than all, the King and Queen,
One in red, and one in green!
3
O Mr. Daddy Long-Legs,
Said Mr. Floppy-Fly,
Its true that I never go to court
And I will tell you why.
If I had six long legs like yours,
At once Id go to court!
But oh! I cant, because my legs
Are so extremely short.
And Im afraid the King and Qeen
(One in red and one in green)
Would say aloud, You are not in fit
You Fly, t come to court a bit!
4
O Mr. Daddy Long-Legs,
Said Mr. Floppy Fly,
I wish youd sing one little song!
One mumbian melody!
You used to sing so awful well
In former days gone by,
But now you never sing at all;
I wish youd tell me why:
For if you would, the silvery sound
Would please the shrimps and cockles round,
And all the crabs would gladly come
To hear you sing, Ah, Hum di Hum!
5
Said Mr. Daddy Long-Legs,
I can never sing again!
And if you wish, Ill tell you why,
Although it gives me pain.
For years I could not hum a bit,
Or sing the smallest song;
And this the dreadful reason is,
My legs are grown too long!
My six long legs, all here and there,
Oppress my bosom with despair;
And if I stand, or lie, or sit,
I cannot sing one little bit!
6
So Mr. Daddy Long-Legs
And Mr. Floppy Fly
Sat down in silence by the sea,
And gazed upon the sky.
They said, This is a dreadful thing!
The world has all gone wrong,
Since one has legs to short by half,
The other much too long!
One never more can go to court,
Because his legs have grown too short;
The other one cannot sing a song,
Because his legs have grown too long!
7
Then Mr. Daddy Long-Legs
And Mr. Floppy Fly
Rushed downward to the foaming sea
With one sponge-taneous cry;
And there they found a little boat
Whose sails were pink and gray;
And off they sailed among the waves
Far, and far away.
They sailed across the silent main
And reached the great Gromboolian plain;
And there they play for evermore
At battlecock and shuttledore.



There was an Old Man of Nepaul,
From his horse had a terrible fall;
But, though split quite in two,
With some very strong glue
They mended that Man of Nepaul


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2000 Elena and Yacov Feldman