Blog Tools
Edit your Blog
Build a Blog
View Profile
30 Jan, 12 > 5 Feb, 12
17 Oct, 11 > 23 Oct, 11
10 Jan, 11 > 16 Jan, 11
29 Nov, 10 > 5 Dec, 10
20 Sep, 10 > 26 Sep, 10
19 Jul, 10 > 25 Jul, 10
28 Dec, 09 > 3 Jan, 10
14 Dec, 09 > 20 Dec, 09
28 Sep, 09 > 4 Oct, 09
24 Aug, 09 > 30 Aug, 09
3 Aug, 09 > 9 Aug, 09
15 Jun, 09 > 21 Jun, 09
8 Jun, 09 > 14 Jun, 09
30 Mar, 09 > 5 Apr, 09
23 Feb, 09 > 1 Mar, 09
12 Jan, 09 > 18 Jan, 09
15 Dec, 08 > 21 Dec, 08
24 Nov, 08 > 30 Nov, 08
27 Oct, 08 > 2 Nov, 08
13 Oct, 08 > 19 Oct, 08
15 Sep, 08 > 21 Sep, 08
8 Sep, 08 > 14 Sep, 08
1 Sep, 08 > 7 Sep, 08
19 May, 08 > 25 May, 08
12 May, 08 > 18 May, 08
14 Apr, 08 > 20 Apr, 08
24 Mar, 08 > 30 Mar, 08
17 Mar, 08 > 23 Mar, 08
25 Feb, 08 > 2 Mar, 08
28 Jan, 08 > 3 Feb, 08
21 Jan, 08 > 27 Jan, 08
31 Dec, 07 > 6 Jan, 08
12 Nov, 07 > 18 Nov, 07
15 Oct, 07 > 21 Oct, 07
8 Oct, 07 > 14 Oct, 07
1 Oct, 07 > 7 Oct, 07
10 Sep, 07 > 16 Sep, 07
2 Jul, 07 > 8 Jul, 07
25 Jun, 07 > 1 Jul, 07
28 May, 07 > 3 Jun, 07
5 Mar, 07 > 11 Mar, 07
5 Feb, 07 > 11 Feb, 07
8 Jan, 07 > 14 Jan, 07
18 Dec, 06 > 24 Dec, 06
4 Dec, 06 > 10 Dec, 06
20 Nov, 06 > 26 Nov, 06
13 Nov, 06 > 19 Nov, 06
16 Oct, 06 > 22 Oct, 06
9 Oct, 06 > 15 Oct, 06
25 Sep, 06 > 1 Oct, 06
28 Aug, 06 > 3 Sep, 06
7 Aug, 06 > 13 Aug, 06
24 Jul, 06 > 30 Jul, 06
10 Jul, 06 > 16 Jul, 06
26 Jun, 06 > 2 Jul, 06
29 May, 06 > 4 Jun, 06
22 May, 06 > 28 May, 06
8 May, 06 > 14 May, 06
1 May, 06 > 7 May, 06
17 Apr, 06 > 23 Apr, 06
20 Mar, 06 > 26 Mar, 06
20 Feb, 06 > 26 Feb, 06
13 Feb, 06 > 19 Feb, 06
30 Jan, 06 > 5 Feb, 06
23 Jan, 06 > 29 Jan, 06
16 Jan, 06 > 22 Jan, 06
2 Jan, 06 > 8 Jan, 06
26 Dec, 05 > 1 Jan, 06
19 Dec, 05 > 25 Dec, 05
5 Dec, 05 > 11 Dec, 05
28 Nov, 05 > 4 Dec, 05
14 Nov, 05 > 20 Nov, 05
7 Nov, 05 > 13 Nov, 05
24 Oct, 05 > 30 Oct, 05
17 Oct, 05 > 23 Oct, 05
10 Oct, 05 > 16 Oct, 05
19 Sep, 05 > 25 Sep, 05
29 Aug, 05 > 4 Sep, 05
22 Aug, 05 > 28 Aug, 05
8 Aug, 05 > 14 Aug, 05
25 Jul, 05 > 31 Jul, 05
18 Jul, 05 > 24 Jul, 05
4 Jul, 05 > 10 Jul, 05
27 Jun, 05 > 3 Jul, 05
13 Jun, 05 > 19 Jun, 05
6 Jun, 05 > 12 Jun, 05
30 May, 05 > 5 Jun, 05
23 May, 05 > 29 May, 05
16 May, 05 > 22 May, 05
2 May, 05 > 8 May, 05
25 Apr, 05 > 1 May, 05
11 Apr, 05 > 17 Apr, 05
4 Apr, 05 > 10 Apr, 05
21 Feb, 05 > 27 Feb, 05
3 Jan, 05 > 9 Jan, 05
27 Dec, 04 > 2 Jan, 05
6 Dec, 04 > 12 Dec, 04
15 Nov, 04 > 21 Nov, 04
25 Oct, 04 > 31 Oct, 04
27 Sep, 04 > 3 Oct, 04
6 Sep, 04 > 12 Sep, 04
16 Aug, 04 > 22 Aug, 04
9 Aug, 04 > 15 Aug, 04
2 Aug, 04 > 8 Aug, 04
26 Jul, 04 > 1 Aug, 04
19 Jul, 04 > 25 Jul, 04
12 Jul, 04 > 18 Jul, 04
5 Jul, 04 > 11 Jul, 04
28 Jun, 04 > 4 Jul, 04
14 Jun, 04 > 20 Jun, 04
7 Jun, 04 > 13 Jun, 04
31 May, 04 > 6 Jun, 04
24 May, 04 > 30 May, 04
17 May, 04 > 23 May, 04
10 May, 04 > 16 May, 04
3 May, 04 > 9 May, 04
26 Apr, 04 > 2 May, 04
19 Apr, 04 > 25 Apr, 04
12 Apr, 04 > 18 Apr, 04
5 Apr, 04 > 11 Apr, 04
29 Mar, 04 > 4 Apr, 04
15 Mar, 04 > 21 Mar, 04
8 Mar, 04 > 14 Mar, 04
1 Mar, 04 > 7 Mar, 04
16 Feb, 04 > 22 Feb, 04
9 Feb, 04 > 15 Feb, 04
2 Feb, 04 > 8 Feb, 04
26 Jan, 04 > 1 Feb, 04
19 Jan, 04 > 25 Jan, 04
12 Jan, 04 > 18 Jan, 04
5 Jan, 04 > 11 Jan, 04
29 Dec, 03 > 4 Jan, 04
22 Dec, 03 > 28 Dec, 03
15 Dec, 03 > 21 Dec, 03
8 Dec, 03 > 14 Dec, 03
1 Dec, 03 > 7 Dec, 03
24 Nov, 03 > 30 Nov, 03
17 Nov, 03 > 23 Nov, 03
10 Nov, 03 > 16 Nov, 03
3 Nov, 03 > 9 Nov, 03
27 Oct, 03 > 2 Nov, 03
20 Oct, 03 > 26 Oct, 03
13 Oct, 03 > 19 Oct, 03
6 Oct, 03 > 12 Oct, 03
29 Sep, 03 > 5 Oct, 03
22 Sep, 03 > 28 Sep, 03
15 Sep, 03 > 21 Sep, 03
8 Sep, 03 > 14 Sep, 03
25 Aug, 03 > 31 Aug, 03
18 Aug, 03 > 24 Aug, 03
11 Aug, 03 > 17 Aug, 03
4 Aug, 03 > 10 Aug, 03
28 Jul, 03 > 3 Aug, 03
21 Jul, 03 > 27 Jul, 03
14 Jul, 03 > 20 Jul, 03
7 Jul, 03 > 13 Jul, 03
23 Jun, 03 > 29 Jun, 03
16 Jun, 03 > 22 Jun, 03
9 Jun, 03 > 15 Jun, 03
You are not logged in. Log in
Entries by Topic
All topics  «
Return of the Knave
Drink It Black
Monday, 27 September 2004
Yo ho ho
Another broad category next to Action is Adventure and comics found a natural home for titles like Adventure, Amazing Adventures and Bizarre Adventures. Not to mention Adventures of Tintin.

There are certain limitations to the 2D medium; Meryl Streep can take a break from funny accents to go whitewater rafting and make that the whole movie, but try going on for even a couple of pages of the protagonists doing nothing but hurtling through rapids. It doesn't work. But we should all have such limitations because comics show adventure:

in prehistoric times
in the jungle
on the western plains
on the battlefield
in outer space

though there are problems with the adventure tag here. There is no risk if you can bend rifles and bullets bounce off you, and adventure implies risk.
No matter how exotic the locale there comes a time when the threat of a corrupt cattle baron becomes de rigeur to a western and not at all a feature of adventure.

Even a character like Dr Mid-nite, who can only see wearing night vision goggles; once the reader is used to seeing him out with his fellow mystery men, the adventure aspect is blunted.

Challengers of the Unknown, by their name alone, are tailor-made for adventure. And Carl Barks' run on the Disney ducks is graphic adventure par excellence.




Posted by berko_wills at 3:50 AM NZT
Updated: Monday, 4 October 2004 12:47 AM NZT
Post Comment | Permalink
Saturday, 4 September 2004
Jim, Jack and Johnny
There is no doubt that this passage from Joseph Andrews [pp.200-201]is full of action so why does it lack the immediacy we normally associate with the genre? There are a number of reasons:

  • it's in past tense. It's natural that storytelling would have evolved this way, tales told around the campfire of the day's hunt and a brush with danger. But it does put the reader at one remove from the action; and the printed page lacks the nuances that a seasoned orator could bring

  • it's in third person. Now I don't know that this impeded the immediacy of Edge...a new kind of western hero but where the characters are more mannered, it only adds to the stilted effect

  • oh those conjunctions! The fogging index put a stop to this sort of thing. Putting a whole string of thoughts or actions into the one sentence makes it harder to grasp the detail of what is going on

  • here, the novelist's stylistic quirk. He follows a superb clause: 'The poet, who was the nimblest, entering the chamber first, searched the bed, and every other part, but to no purpose; the bird was flown with a rather lesser one: as the impatient reader, who might otherwise have been in pain for her, was before advertised.' In 2004 this just looks clumsy. And the 'postmodern already' (I didn't say that)nod to the reader may not detract from the story in some reader's eyes, but it does distract from the action

    Now the purpose of all this is not to hang shit on Fielding. A non-fiction book I read had the proposition that kings and queens would have given up their cold draughty castles - and all the land that went with it - for a modest suburban home with air conditioning and central heating. Similarly the novelisation of Thunderbolt and Lightfoot is less awkward in its humble construction than this seminal work.

    And this is not action for action's sake; other elements such as comedy and drama, plot and characterisation, are factors. The narrator is too reflective to have action as the central focus. There is much to appreciate:

    • the iconic characters ('the captain, the poet, the player, and three servants') presage their extensive use in the graphic medium and they are well used here as well as well 'drawn'

    • the long-winded way of having the host reveal that they possess no fire-arms adds to the comic effect

    • Joseph, despite a relatively brief part in this passage, makes his presence felt in such a way that we are left in no doubt that he is the protagonist. Having him be the only one with a proper name helps too

    • The captain and the poet - but not the player (perhaps he wasn't such a player after all) - lead the action, even if the poet does bow out at the first sign of violence


    II

    Apart from appearing two centuries later in the development of storytelling and action, comic books have an advantage when it comes to showing action. The panel showing a picture of Captain America encased in a block of ice as Cap recaps, makes the fact it is told in past tense, less distancing.

    Whether a story is in first, second, or third person narrative is rendered moot by the fact that we can see the actions as they unfold. Even in wordless narratives

    Ditto long conjunctions. Unless you make the mistake of filling your comic with blowhard word balloons and excessive commentary, everything is straight to the point. Sometimes the only word at the top of the panel is 'Suddenly..'

    Posted by berko_wills at 5:26 AM NZT
    Updated: Saturday, 4 September 2004 7:20 PM NZT
Tuesday, 10 August 2004
Bending the elbow
Atom, a short guy punching above his weight, is an action hero, as is the Cheyenne Kid; Adam Strange is action (and romance) at the other side of the galaxy, courtesy of a zeta beam; Captain Savage is action at sea and so it goes. Action comics have also featured prominently in Central and South America.

Superman started out in a series called Action Comics and seventy-five years later is still there.

Those figurines bearing the likenesses and attributes of the comic character they're molded on are not dolls, toys, or even replicas - they're action figures. And they remain so even if you paint over them.

Maybe it would be easier to define a comic that wasn't predominantly action-oriented, like Little Audrey.

II

For those used to walking into their local video store and poring over the large Action section, this may seem puzzling. Westerns and Martial Arts and War all have their sections. Perhaps we recognise Action by its generic title convention, its wooden acting, its threadbare plot. It is harder to gauge these things when we move to a more static medium, which carries titles like War Is Hell. The tip-off that characters are not being fully nuanced is only evidenced when, for example, the crop of hacks that Tom de Falco brought to Marvel showed every character with teeth gritted.
And underdeveloped stories are those where the fight scene goes on a tad long and we barely see the main character interacting on other levels.

III

"He swung a punch but missed completely" so the oldest comics tell us. And there's Captain Dependable doing just as the caption says.
But there is a sense that the early writers were feeling their way in a new medium. Novels - especially airport novels and spy thrillers - contain action aplenty but look at this passage from one of the very earliest novels (Joseph Andrews by Henry Fielding, 1742):

Adams had soon put on all his clothes but his breeches, which, in his hurry, he forgot; however, they were pretty well supplied by the length of his other garments; and now, the house-door being opened, the captain, the poet, the player, and three servants came in. The captain told the host that two fellows, who were in his house, had run away with a young woman, and desired to know in which room she lay. The host, who presently believed the story, directed them, and instantly the captain and the poet, jostling one another, ran up. The poet, who was the nimblest, entering the chamber first, searched the bed, and every other part, but to no purpose; the bird was flown, as the impatient reader, who might otherwise have been in pain for her, was before advertised. They then enquired where the men lay, and were approaching the chamber, when Joseph roared out, in a loud voice, that he would shoot the first man who offered to attack the door. The captain enquired what fire-arms they had; to which the host answered, he believed they had none; nay, he was almost convinced of it, for he had heard one ask the other in the evening what they should have done if they had been overtaken, when they had no arms; to which the other answered, they would have defended themselves with their sticks as long as they were able, and God would assist a just cause. This satisfied the captain, but not the poet, who prudently retreated downstairs, saying, it was his business to record great actions, and not to do them. [...]



Posted by berko_wills at 4:05 PM NZT
Updated: Saturday, 4 September 2004 7:43 AM NZT
Post Comment | Permalink
Wednesday, 4 August 2004
Announcement
For those wondering where all the social commentary went, my socio-political side has a new home called Touched By The Son.

For those only interested in comics, stay right here.

Posted by berko_wills at 3:43 PM NZT
Post Comment | Permalink
Sunday, 1 August 2004
Magic potion
I've always been attracted to magic and fiction is a good place to indulge this fascination without risking offence to other denominations. Reading nonsense incantations will neither extend your life nor blight the neighbour's crops, but it does entertain.

There's no way of explaining a character like Johnny Thunder and his magical Thunderbolt without these full flights of fancy.

Posted by berko_wills at 10:22 PM NZT
Post Comment | Permalink
Thursday, 29 July 2004
Name label
I couldn't just leave fantasy at one entry as it is so pervasive and intrinsically linked to the comics field. After all, even western characters like Kid Colt Outlaw - who drinks milk and shoots the gun from the baddy's hand rather than killing him - and battlefield characters like Sgt Fury and His Howling Commandos - who don't wear helmets and have a bizarre 'war cry'- are more fantastic than realistic.

I wasn't able to follow the same patina when looking for comic book goblins and fairies and such but I did come across some great links, not all of which point to comic books exclusively. Regardless, it is the ideal medium to pick up an audience similar to the Tim Hunter lookalike.

Posted by berko_wills at 3:58 PM NZT
Post Comment | Permalink
Sunday, 25 July 2004
Invisible ink
Comic books were originally comic strips collected and it wasn't until the 1930's that original thematic stories were bound in this form.
Fantasy has long been a natural fit for funnybooks and there could be a number of reasons for this: the target juvenile audience have a greater appreciation for "made up stuff", if you're knocking them out on a production line then it doesn't require the research that a realistic setting does, and it is possible to show a great deal more in a couple of panels than it is to construct a film set or go into reams of descriptive prose text.

Fantasy is also one of those wondrously generic titles that allow you to have a main protagonist playing off against mythological and supernatural characters while back-up stories serve broader narratives.

Posted by berko_wills at 9:47 PM NZT
Post Comment | Permalink
Thursday, 22 July 2004
Nag's Head
Here's a better history of the very first comics. And they're British, people.

Posted by berko_wills at 3:54 PM NZT
Post Comment | Permalink
Wednesday, 21 July 2004
Shirtfront
Comics themselves began in the nineteenth century - though very near the close - with two largely forgotten characters from opposite sides of the pond.

The Yellow Kid was a mischievous urchin who wore a yellow gown (yes, a real kid rather than some gunslinger) with different wording on it. The message and the image were conflated in a way not seen since. Though those Will Eisner splash pages where he incorporates the name of the strip "The Spirit" is in that direction.

The other was Ally Sloper, a crafty curmudgeon.

Two characters across the age spectrum and, given their outsider status, possessing the common touch that made this new artform for everyone.

Posted by berko_wills at 3:56 PM NZT
Post Comment | Permalink
Monday, 19 July 2004
Firewater
Naturally the Americans would find a way to mythologise the nineteenth century as well, with a western comic book appearing in 1937. Their gunfighters often walked the line between hero and outlaw in, I suppose, a way that our bushrangers - were they given the same pictorial treatment - could not.

Native Americans had mainly support roles - as they did in other media - and even the heroes who wore Indian garb were often white men in disguise. And the first black western character made his debut in Gunhawks courtesy of Stan Lee.

Posted by berko_wills at 12:36 AM NZT
Post Comment | Permalink

Newer | Latest | Older